Author Topic: Manual Dough Sheeter  (Read 45043 times)

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Offline Jet_deck

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Manual Dough Sheeter
« on: July 26, 2010, 06:31:01 PM »
I have the items that I plan to use to build a manual dough sheeter.  It should be inexpensive, and easy to take down to store.  We probably won't use it every time that we do pizza, but what the hey, I'll have one anyway... :chef:
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends


Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2010, 06:38:52 PM »
It will be neat to see the final product.  Thanks for sharing JB.

JT

scott123

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2010, 09:02:54 AM »
Considering the cost of commercial sheeters, this sounds interesting.

buceriasdon

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2010, 09:44:46 AM »
I don't want to be a wet blanket :( but I hope that is not PVC tubing in the picture. PVC is not food safe.
Don

Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2010, 10:21:17 AM »
I don't want to be a wet blanket :( but I hope that is not PVC tubing in the picture. PVC is not food safe.
Don

Your joking right ?  PVC carries half of the worlds drinking water supply. :-D
 

PVC, CPVC, PEX, and Other Plastic Plumbing Materials:
Plastic plumbing has been used for potable and non-potable water applications since the 1950s. Initially, there were many concerns about these products potentially leaching harmful chemicals into the water. To ensure that the public's health was protected, independent standards were quickly developed which established strict guidelines for these products.]

Today, plastic plumbing products designed for potable water applications are usually designated with either "NSF-PW" or "NSF-61" to indicate that the product complies with the health effects requirements of NSF/ANSI Standard 61 for materials designed for contact with potable water. This standard also establishes similar guidelines for other plumbing materials, including copper tubing. If your pipe is not coded with one of these designations or if it is designated with an alternative code such "NSF-DWV," it is probably not meant for potable water applications and should not be used for such purposes.



If its good enough for water, it is good enough for me. :chef:
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Offline Randy

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #5 on: July 27, 2010, 11:56:47 AM »
Keep going dude.  Neat idea.

Should the pipe end up flexing too much in the middle, you might be able to fill the pipe with a quickcrete product.  Just a thought just in case.

Randy

Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2010, 01:18:04 PM »

Should the pipe end up flexing too much in the middle, you might be able to fill the pipe with a quickcrete product.  Just a thought just in case.


I was thinking expanding foam stuff, but it may not be stiff enough.
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Offline Randy

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #7 on: July 27, 2010, 06:16:14 PM »
I have worked with expanding foam a few years back.  The typical home depot foam in the can may not harden anyway in an enclosed situation.  You can get really stiff foam but it is a two part like mixing an epoxy.
Like I said, keep going, it is a fun project for us all to watch.

Randy

Offline Tampa

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #8 on: July 28, 2010, 01:49:02 PM »
Jet_deck

Iím also a fan.

It looks like the PVC you are using is 2Ē schedule 40 Ė I know that to be rather stout stuff, and hopefully all you need.

Like Randy says, I donít think youíll get much from adding foam (been there, done that).  You could add an idler wheel at the midpoint above the top roller and below the bottom roller.  That will cut your bending in half.  Alternatively, you could go to a larger diameter on the PVC, but I think you are on the right path.  Gin something up quickly and try it.  Anticipated problems are often replaced by something you never though of.

Pls keep us posted on the progress.

Dave

Offline Mick.Chicago

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #9 on: July 28, 2010, 03:07:04 PM »
Very interesting, I don't 'see' it yet but I wish you all the best.


Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #10 on: July 28, 2010, 04:37:47 PM »
Jet_deck

  Alternatively, you could go to a larger diameter on the PVC, but I think you are on the right path. 

Dave

I had envisioned using schedule 80, but the sch 40 seemed like it may work.  I got the sprockets on order today, and a machinist friend, BBQ Bob, helped me solve the last piece of the puzzle.  My goal is to be able to sheet a room temp DKM thin crust dough.  Also, I have a way to sheet a crust with the rim still intact, without smashing it all to heck. :) :chef: :pizza:
I am just an electric can opener away from not having to crank it.
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #11 on: July 28, 2010, 06:37:19 PM »
Very interesting, I don't 'see' it yet but I wish you all the best.

Just about a width of a nickle between the rollers now.  This will be the closed position and it will open to maybe 3/4" or so.

« Last Edit: July 28, 2010, 06:51:23 PM by Jet_deck »
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

scott123

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #12 on: July 29, 2010, 04:08:08 AM »
I'm curious, don't rollers on commercial sheeters have a greater diameter? One would think that the diameter of the roller would dictate the thickness of dough ball that you can feed through it.

With a commercial sheeter do you have to flatten the dough first, or can you feed it something an inch or two thick?

Offline Tampa

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #13 on: July 29, 2010, 08:49:02 AM »
Scott - I don't know the answer to your question, but it raises a couple of ideas.

If running the dough does cause the rollers to bend, you can just roll it a few more times, and will likely get a more uniform profile.  Also, the rotation speed will make a big difference in the loading on the PVC.  Slower speeds will give time for the dough to conform.

Dave

scott123

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #14 on: July 29, 2010, 11:27:03 AM »
Multiple passes, Dave, who's got time for that?  :P

What about black steel pipe- would that work for something like this?

Offline Randy

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #15 on: July 29, 2010, 12:05:11 PM »
Jet_deck is the first one to make a real stab at making a sheeter.  We have threaded about it for a couple of years but no one has gotten physical about it.

I really like the criteria he set.  Low cost, light weight, easy to store.  A real bold undertaking.

Randy

Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #16 on: July 29, 2010, 12:29:14 PM »

What about black steel pipe- would that work for something like this?

I am glad that you brought steel pipe up.  I wanted anyone to be able to build this thing with a "simple" set of tools.  If I were to go the steel route, the cost to me would have been about the same, and I would have already been done. ;D
Since this great site is mainly about the finished product, I wasn't sure who would have access to more than a "simple" set of tools, and it makes it more fun for me to make sure that others can duplicate (and improve) what I've done.  I by no means feel that I have the cat in the bag yet, or that it will be something that anyone else will want to tackle.  I came to this forum by recommendation of a member here (and of a bbq forum) to "duplicate" the 2Stone pizza grill.  With that done, I just gotta have me a dough sheeter.  Would play doh be an acceptable test dough?
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #17 on: July 29, 2010, 12:51:14 PM »
JD your contraptions are inspiring. I think play-doh would be a great test medium.

Offline Mick.Chicago

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #18 on: July 29, 2010, 01:11:45 PM »
If it's anything like rolling pasta then multiple passes are important, unless you have a large extruding machine, but that's another story.

If you try and roll too thick too fast you will tear.  Take it one notch at a time.

Offline Mick.Chicago

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #19 on: July 29, 2010, 01:14:56 PM »
  Would play doh be an acceptable test dough?

No, I don't think so.

There would be no point honing in the device with something dissimilar then putting a two day dough you toiled over through your roller and watching it buckle like a Chicago street, now that's messy.


 

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