Author Topic: Manual Dough Sheeter  (Read 42506 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21590
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #40 on: August 02, 2010, 07:59:43 AM »
I know nothing about building a manual dough sheeter, but have been following this thread.  I donít know if these pictures will help you or not, but these are old candy machines that were used to make stick candy.  They were hand cranked and a piece of warm candy was then placed though them.  Just thought I would post the pictures in case you could get an idea from them, on how a manual dough sheeter might work. These hand cranked candy machines could be adjusted up or down for the thickness of candy and they just have two gears.  I had planned on some point in time in trying these out to see if they would work out for dough and something like rolling out dough for breadsticks, but haven't had time to clean them up and try them.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!


Offline Tampa

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1587
Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #41 on: August 02, 2010, 08:44:42 AM »
Wow Norma, those are perfect examples of implementations that are reasonably easy to repurpose as a dough sheeters.

Good find.

Dave

Online norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21590
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #42 on: August 02, 2010, 08:54:26 AM »
Wow Norma, those are perfect examples of implementations that are reasonably easy to repurpose as a dough sheeters.

Good find.

Dave

As I said in my last post, I am the last person that knows anything about building a manual dough sheeter, but had thought about the way I had used these old candy machines to make candy in the past.  If anyone thinks any of this can work, I can take closer pictures or more detailed ones.

Just thought this thread was interesting about building a manual dough sheeter.  My father used to build and design many things.  He could have built anything.  He made many tools and made us many toys, when I was younger.  He even built us a kind of racing car we drove, that had some kind of push pedals, that would make the race car go.  We had loads of fun with that. He could weld, fabricate anything out of nothing and also built the home I had grown up in from the ground up with my mothers help.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Jet_deck

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3041
  • Location: Between Houston and Mexico
Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #43 on: August 02, 2010, 09:07:51 AM »
Thanks Norma for being kind enough to put those pictures up.  The candy crimpers do have an adjustment for the thickness of the candy.  But probably much less of an adjustment than we would all want for a dough sheeter ( to go from ball thickness down to cracker thin).  I have no experience with that type of sprocket, but I will see how deep of a sprocket I can get in that style.  Thanks again.
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Online norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21590
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #44 on: August 02, 2010, 09:12:04 AM »
Thanks Norma for being kind enough to put those pictures up.  The candy crimpers do have an adjustment for the thickness of the candy.  But probably much less of an adjustment than we would all want for a dough sheeter ( to go from ball thickness down to cracker thin).  I have no experience with that type of sprocket, but I will see how deep of a sprocket I can get in that style.  Thanks again.

Jet_deck,

If you need any other pictures of this to help you out, let me know.  I also am anxious to see how you make out with your manual dough sheeter.

Best of luck,

Norma

Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Jet_deck

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3041
  • Location: Between Houston and Mexico
Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #45 on: August 02, 2010, 01:12:18 PM »
You know, I wonder if they have to be tied together.  I think I would give it a go just driving the bottom one and let the top roll free.

Randy

That might be like pushing a loaded wheelbarrow through the mud.
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Offline holorim

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 22
Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #46 on: August 02, 2010, 03:06:15 PM »
Hi,
Here are the photos of my hand-driven dough sheeter (small commercial model, now retired). The crank directly drives the lower roller, and the chain drives the upper roller via the tension-gear located above : this one is mounted on a mobile shaft kept in place via a set screw and a spring (like on a bicycle derailleur).
« Last Edit: August 02, 2010, 03:23:29 PM by holorim »

Offline Jet_deck

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3041
  • Location: Between Houston and Mexico
Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #47 on: August 02, 2010, 03:46:50 PM »
Thank you very much.  That is exactly what I needed to see.  That is the same arrangement I was going to use for my chain drive model, with the exception of the placement and design on the idler (chain tensioner).  It looks like the up and down control of the top roller is with that round disk that is kinda egg shaped.(eccentric)  Is the unit sprung open or sprung closed?
« Last Edit: August 02, 2010, 03:54:24 PM by Jet_deck »
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Offline holorim

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 22
Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #48 on: August 02, 2010, 04:35:50 PM »
Yes the top roller's clearance is controlled by 2 cams fastened on the upper rod.

Sorry but I'm not familiar with the expressions sprung open and sprung closed ... what do they mean ?

Offline Jet_deck

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3041
  • Location: Between Houston and Mexico
Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #49 on: August 02, 2010, 05:04:20 PM »
Does a spring hold the top roller in the closed or open position (sprung closed / sprung open) ?  Or - there is no spring.
Do you still use the sheeter? 
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends


Offline Jet_deck

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3041
  • Location: Between Houston and Mexico
Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #50 on: August 02, 2010, 08:06:04 PM »
Cans and bottles for size reference.  I think i will remake the top boards a little longer.  Still need to get a hinge.
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Offline holorim

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 22
Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #51 on: August 03, 2010, 03:40:12 AM »
Does a spring hold the top roller in the closed or open position (sprung closed / sprung open) ?  Or - there is no spring.
Do you still use the sheeter? 
Ok. Yes there is a spring which locks the control rod in its position : the spring strongly pushes a steel ball against a disc regularly drilled, and then the rod is locked when the ball enters in a blind hole ; this system offers about 10 positions for the top roller.
No I stopped using this sheeter since I buyed a bigger and efficient one (an electric sheeter with conveyor belts, but made for bread & pastry, not for pizza).
Regards holorim

Offline Jet_deck

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3041
  • Location: Between Houston and Mexico
Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #52 on: August 03, 2010, 11:08:18 AM »
Holorim can you take a couple of pictures of the spring and ball and disc.  Is the sheeter for sale?  Are you in the US ?
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Offline holorim

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 22
Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #53 on: August 03, 2010, 12:44:31 PM »
Holorim can you take a couple of pictures of the spring and ball and disc.  Is the sheeter for sale?  Are you in the US ?
Here are the requested photos ;)
The spring and ball are not visible because enclosed inside the blue tubular stand.
I may sale this sheeter, but I live in france and it's quite heavy (entirely made of cast iron and steel)
Regards.

Offline Jet_deck

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3041
  • Location: Between Houston and Mexico
Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #54 on: August 03, 2010, 01:13:46 PM »
Thanks Holorim
 ;D :chef: :pizza:
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Offline Tampa

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1587
Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #55 on: August 03, 2010, 01:41:07 PM »
Somebody needs to cut back on the soda. ;D

Offline Jet_deck

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3041
  • Location: Between Houston and Mexico
Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #56 on: August 05, 2010, 08:54:04 AM »
Got the stub shafts epoxy'd in.  Got sprockets attached and got the hinge attached.  I need to trim the hinge and attach a handle and reassemble. ;D ;D ;D
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Offline Jet_deck

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3041
  • Location: Between Houston and Mexico
Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #57 on: August 07, 2010, 03:49:29 PM »
Everthing except for the crank handle  ;D :chef: ;D
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21896
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #58 on: August 07, 2010, 06:39:58 PM »
Everthing except for the crank handle.

You forgot the soda  :-D.

Peter

Offline c0mpl3x

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1087
  • Age: 27
  • Location: north of pittsburgh PA
  • crumb bubbles!
Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #59 on: August 08, 2010, 01:01:14 AM »
jet if you are interested i have a 350rpm 120vac/vdc forward/reverse 1/2" shaft motor.  it's 1.6hp.  i imagine that would work for you (you can run off of 24v)

would give you about 70rpm. at 70rpm. it's making a complete rotation every .86 seconds.  about two seconds to feed a 14" strech under a 20% speed reduction load
« Last Edit: August 08, 2010, 01:09:31 AM by bbp c0mpl3x »
Hotdogs kill more people than sharks do, yearly.


 

pizzapan