Author Topic: Manual Dough Sheeter  (Read 41144 times)

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Offline toekneemac

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #80 on: August 24, 2010, 08:02:13 PM »
You may want to re think brushing the rollers with olive oil.  1. Shouldn't you use mineral oil instead?  2.  Wouldn't keeping the rollers dry, be better than coating them with a sticky substance?  I mean, most pizza places use flour, not oil.  Perhaps you can add a tray in the back so you can throw some flour onto it and then throw your dough into the rollers.  That would accomplish two things:  Easier for you to operate and a place to toss some flour on to.

Also, how wide is your machine and is it adjustable?


But dude, hell of a job, really.  Looks real good.



Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #81 on: August 25, 2010, 10:32:06 PM »
Quote from: toekneemac link=topic=11459.msg107855#msg107855 date=1282694533

....    Also, how wide is your machine and is it adjustable?  ....


[/quote

15" usable width.  Gap is adjustable, about 3/4" down to 0.  I cut a sheet pan in half and got the dough exit side fitted tonight.
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #82 on: August 26, 2010, 09:54:12 AM »
Dough exit slide and thickness (thinness) adjustment lever. ;D
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #83 on: August 30, 2010, 12:15:07 PM »
I finally got to test the dough sheeter last nite.  I used Randy's thin crust recipe from here :http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11697.msg107955.html#msg107955 My son and I made the dough friday, so roughly 20 hours at room temp then into the fridge for the remainder of time until last nite.  As far as the sheeting went,  it was uneventful.  The sheeter worked flawlessly and it took no real effort to get the job done.  I cut the 38* dough "ball" in half, and sheeted it down to the width of a penny, then trimmed it down to 10 1/4" diameter (skin weight was 11.5 g ). Par baked at 500 for 5 min, topped and finished cooking. I am happy with this contraption, it is a keeper.  I will make a seperate post under cracker crust to tell about how I screwed up the dough. (Imagine the newbie messing up the dough recipe)
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Offline toekneemac

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #84 on: August 30, 2010, 08:25:23 PM »
What was the final cost to build this little jem?  Where did you buy the sprockets and the chain?

Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #85 on: August 31, 2010, 10:01:23 AM »
What was the final cost to build this little jem?  Where did you buy the sprockets and the chain?

Total cost was the $26 that I spent on the two rolling pins.  I recycled the three sprockets from the pvc version.  I can't source the sprockets for you since I don't know where your at, but Motion Industries is a big name here that might have a location near you.  You need a "40A13" sprocket. "40" denotes #40 chain, "A" denotes that it is a plate sprocket (with no hub on either side) "13" denotes 13 tooth.  The sprockets cost me $9 a piece.  Who ever has the sprockets can sell you the #40 chain, usually comes in a 10 foot length.  Just make sure that the sprocket that you buy is a smaller diameter than the rolling pins, that way when the sheeter is set in the thin position, the sprocket teeth won't hit each other.
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Offline Randy

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #86 on: September 01, 2010, 07:26:14 AM »
That really look great.  You are the first to make a working sheeter.  You will be legend in the world of pizzamaking.com. 8)

Been real busy lately.  Glad I didn't miss your test post.

Randy



 

Offline Papageorgio

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #87 on: September 20, 2010, 11:33:45 AM »
I love projects like this. Nice job on the finished project.

Now for the 64K question... does it make rolling out the dough any easier than using a simple rolling pin?
It looks like would require a working area designated to the sheeting process on the counter top.

Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #88 on: September 20, 2010, 06:01:40 PM »
....Now for the 64K question... does it make rolling out the dough any easier than using a simple rolling pin? ....


Yes, especially with the cracker type dough that is very low hydration and hasn't been warmed up to facilitate easier rolling.
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Offline Randy

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #89 on: September 20, 2010, 07:43:57 PM »
One cold day. give puff pastry a try with your sheeter.  You need a nice cold kitchen to do it but it should be really nifty.

Randy


Offline Papageorgio

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #90 on: September 23, 2010, 01:33:11 PM »
Is it difficult to feed the dough into the rollers at the same time you're turning the crank? If it were motor driven it would free up both your hands. Though I wouldn't want to catch my finger in it while running.

Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #91 on: September 23, 2010, 04:19:32 PM »
Is it difficult to feed the dough into the rollers at the same time you're turning the crank?

No, I make the kids do it. ;D
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Offline c0mpl3x

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #92 on: September 23, 2010, 09:44:24 PM »
No, I make the kids do it. ;D

smaller fingers, less chance of getting them sucked in.

great plan  ;D
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Offline PizzaEater

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #93 on: October 20, 2010, 04:52:35 PM »
I'm a bit of a gear head, that really is great work! Well done!

Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #94 on: October 21, 2010, 11:32:48 AM »
I'm a bit of a gear head, that really is great work! Well done!

Thanks PizzaEater, it was a fun and worthwhile build.  I'm craving a cracker crust pizza right now.
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Offline Texaswomyn

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #95 on: February 19, 2011, 01:27:43 AM »
Jet_deck, I realize this is now an "old" thread but I just found it tonight. I'm fascinated by your creation and wonder if it would work for pie crusts?  Cinnamon rolls? 

Have you continued to use it with good results?  I think I'll get my husband to take a look at what you did and see if he can build one for me. Thanks so much for any thoughts or suggestions you might have.  Diane

Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #96 on: February 19, 2011, 06:44:31 PM »
Sure, it continues to work well.  I sheeted 2 cracker crusts last weekend or so and it did its job perfectly.  In fact, one of the first dough sheeters (manual) that I found was used for pastry crust.  If your hubby has a hard time sourcing materials or components, let me know, I would be happy to help.
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Offline danidiomas

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #97 on: January 08, 2013, 08:11:13 PM »
I was looking about this topic and It's great what you did. In my search I discovered that in Brazil they have lots of wide dough sheeters.

http://lista.mercadolivre.com.br/cozinha-maquinas-massas/cilindro


Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #98 on: September 26, 2013, 01:17:36 PM »
Bump. I can't believe this thread has been mostly untouched for three years. Are you people nuts?!?

Gene, if it's as easy and inexpensive as it appears for you to make these things, I think you need to make at least a few of them and try to sell them to people like me. Even though your instructions are fantastic, I almost certainly will never be able to make one myself. But I want one so bad.

As you know, the Tommy's style laminated cracker crust is my baby. Even though most people may not consider it the best style of pizza in my pizzamaking repertoire, as far as I'm concerned it's my masterpiece. But man, it takes a ton of work for me to roll each Tommy's style skin. And with my neurological disorder, rolling one or two of these totally wipes me out. I'd love to be able to share them with lots of people, but it's getting so hard for me to roll even a couple skins manually. (Shakey's style is even more work than Tommy's style.)

I can't tell you right now that I'd buy one from you if you made one for me (only because of money), but I'd really like to. Also, money may become less of an obstacle soon. Here's why: I may soon be living two miles from downtown Columbus, in my own home (as opposed to several miles outside the suburbs, at my parents' house). If/when that happens, I intend to invite neighbors over for pizza regularly, first to get to know them, but also with the idea of eventually hosting an informal pizzamaking class maybe once a week. I wouldn't even charge people to attend, but I would encourage them to make voluntary donations (which I already know they would gladly do).

Pretty reasonable, don't you think? I do. Furthermore, when someone like you or me (or so many other members) makes pizza for guests, the perceived value of the pizza is at least as high as anything they could buy from most pizzerias. When you add the kind of instruction I can offer, donations will add up quickly. Which means it probably won't take long for me to save up enough money to buy a Jet_deck custom poor man's sheeter (providing one exists for me to buy).

While drafting this post, it occurred to me that if I end up hosting pizzamaking classes, if I had a manual sheeter like yours, a fair amount of people would be exposed to it; people who are already interested in making great pizza (and paying to learn how); prospective buyers. So I don't know. Maybe that's something you might want to think about.

Also, I've wondered if you've made any more intellectual progress with homemade sheeters. That is, in the time since you stopped working on this, have you had any Aha moments that you know could make your sheeter design even better than what you've shared here? This thread is so awesome, man. I can't figure out why it's not 100 pages long. I don't know how other people feel, but I want this thread to remain active and visible, because I think it's one of the most useful threads on the whole site.

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Manual Dough Sheeter
« Reply #99 on: October 11, 2013, 02:26:28 PM »
Gene,

After reading through this thread a few times, I think I have a pretty good idea what most of the sheeter parts do, as well as why they do it. I am not mechanically inclined, which means I probably donít know the proper terminology to use in every instance, but Iím gonna try to explain my understanding of how this contraption works, in hopes that you or someone else will either confirm my understanding or correct me when Iím wrong (because I really need one of these). Whenever I may use improper terminology, please correct me.

Hereís my understanding of how your second manual sheeter works:

There are two main support pieces, which are the vertical sheets of metal with feet extending at the bottom to provide support. In Reply #65, it looks like you call these pieces Ďside platesí (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11459.msg106952.html#msg106952). It appears that the side plates hold the bottom roller in place, while the two smaller plates (inner plates) hold the top roller in place. I assume the inner plates can be moved up and down, in precise unison, thus raising and lowering the top roller, while the bottom roller never moves. In the same post you also mention the two round discs with holes drilled off-center. (More about that later.)

In the second picture of Reply #78 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11459.msg107774.html#msg107774), there are locking pliers (correct term?) attached to the outside of the second highest rod. I assume this enables you to turn the rod, which then either raises or lowers the top rolling pin, depending on which way you turn the rod.

Thereís one more rod near the top of the sheeter, which holds the top sprocket in place but also extends the entire width of the sheeter. I assume there are two main reasons why this rod extends all the way across: 1) To give some extra support for the top sprocket, and 2) To provide a little more structural support for the whole machine. Similarly, I assume the rods located between the feet are entirely for bracing/support. In this picture it also appears that the crank is attached to the bottom roller. Which means if youíre standing on the crank-side of the sheeter, facing the sheeter and cranking clockwise, the dough passes from left to right.

In both of the pictures in Reply #82 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11459.msg108086.html#msg108086), your crank is clearly attached to the top sprocket, rather than the sprocket that serves the bottom roller. Is there a reason why you apparently moved it from the bottom sprocket to the top sprocket? In the second picture of Reply #82, there is a lever or handle. The lever replaced the pliers, right?

I have some other questions. Iím sure my questions make simple concepts seem complicated (because complicating simple ideas is in my genes). If so, please try to keep the answers as simple as possible. My questions:
  • Is there a reason why your chain is on the inside of the side plate, rather than the outside?
  • How are the inner plates held firmly in place (or attached to the side plates) yet still allowed to move up and down?
  • What do the round discs with off-center holes do? I assume they have something to do with raising and lowering the top roller, but Iím not sure how it works.
  • Iím thinking longer feet with a smaller feeder-ramp slope angle might be a little more sturdy and ergonomic, like the Mitropan sheeterís design, shown in Reply #46 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11459.msg105448.html#msg105448). However, I also understand that longer feet would create more weight and a larger footprint, which might force such a sheeter to remain in the same place at all times. Am I thinking in the right direction here? Also, although I know the pictures in Reply #46 are not yours, can you tell me what the green part is (or what it does)?
  • Again, not your pictures, but Iím having trouble understanding what the pictures in Reply #53 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11459.msg105526.html#msg105526) are supposed to tell me. I assume you understand the significance of these pictures because you pretty much copied this thing, but theyíre just not registering anything to me. What are these pictures supposed to be telling me?
I'd be very grateful if you help me figure out what I need to know to make one of these puppies. I know that's a lot to ask, though, so I understand if you don't respond.

Everyone else's input is welcome, too.

Thanks,
Ryan


 

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