Author Topic: PANEANGELI Lievito Di Birra Mastro Fornaio for pizza?  (Read 5787 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 20222
  • Location: Dutch Country, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
PANEANGELI Lievito Di Birra Mastro Fornaio for pizza?
« on: August 12, 2010, 11:36:16 AM »
Steve (Ev) gave me a packet of PANEANGELI Lievito Di Birra Mastro Fornaio on Tuesday.  Before I go about trying to use this yeast, I wonder if this is suitable for pizza.  I looked on the website and all I can find recipes while using translate, but the recipes come up in Italian. On the front of this yeast packet, it shows a pizza.  There are two beautiful angels on this yeast packet.  :)  I used the translation page and found this pizza and panettone di pasquetta, but canít translate the recipes.  Also I saw some recipes for pizza. Steve is Italian, but can't translate. http://www.paneangeli.it/#/ricette/ricetta_della_settimana/
http://www.paneangeli.it/#/ricette/paneangeli/pagina/1 
                           
Did anyone ever try this yeast in a pizza?

Thanks,

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!


Offline Jackie Tran

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6960
  • Location: Albuquerque NM
Re: PANEANGELI Lievito Di Birra Mastro Fornaio for pizza?
« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2010, 11:53:08 AM »
You should be fine Norma.  On the front of the package, I believe it says for pizza, foccacia, specialty bread, and candy?

How much you would use, I have no idea.  You can do a test against your ADY or IDY.  Using equivalent amounts per doughball, and let them rise at room temps.  Using the poppyseed method should give you an idea of which is stronger, and then you would just make eyeball adjustments as needed. 

Chau

Offline BrickStoneOven

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1586
  • Location: Boston
Re: PANEANGELI Lievito Di Birra Mastro Fornaio for pizza?
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2010, 12:22:19 PM »
I translated what it says in the description on the site.

"The Yeast Master Bakery PANEANGELI is dehydrated yeast is made from fresh yeast, which has been removed from the water to make it last longer, and thus is more practical of fresh yeast, because it deteriorates in a few days but kept for more than a year.
The master baker yeast requires the leavening of the dough before baking. E 'therefore suitable for all sweet and savory products that require a slow natural leavening, such as pizza, calzone, focaccia, breads, pastries, donuts, baba, Savarin, braids and chamberlains.
The great merit of the master baker yeast is in its use is practical to use because it shall not be dissolved, or reactivated in the water, but it should be added directly to the flour with two teaspoons of sugar: the mixture is left to rise out of the oven in a warm place covered with a damp cloth until doubled in volume (20 minutes for the dough and salt dough about 40 minutes for cakes)."

This is the "Pizza Margherita" recipe on the site.

For the dough
400 g white flour
1 packet of yeast or master baker PANEANGELI
1 cube of fresh yeast PANEANGELI
10 g sugar (2 teaspoons)
1 heaping tablespoon of salt
2 tablespoons olive oil
250 ml warm water (37-40 °).

To cover:
400 g chopped tomatoes
250 g cubed mozzarella
8 tablespoons olive oil
5-6 basil leaves
salt

"Knead the dough on floured table top for at least 10 minutes, with the enlarged fists, rewind and then dropping it on the table.
Put the dough in floured bowl, cover with a damp cloth and place in a warm place to rise until its volume will be doubled (40 minutes if you used the yeast master baker).
Divide the dough into two loaves leavened much the same, lay them to form two disks with a diameter of 32 cm and place in 2 pizza trays (diameter 32 cm) greased with 2 tablespoons of olive oil each.
Spread on each disk, leaving a blank border of 1 cm, half the tomato sauce and mozzarella. Season with salt and add the basil and 2 tablespoons of oil broke.
Bake the pizza for 15-20 minutes in the preheated oven of medium and low (electric: 200-210 ° C, ventilated: 190-200 ° C, gas: 200-210 ° C), alternating the position of pans halfway cooking."

This is what is says in the first window under the recipe.
  Yeast with Master Baker PANEANGELI:
  Sift the flour into a large bowl and stir in the yeast master baker.
  At the center of the pile practicing a hole and pour sugar, salt and oil.
  Mix everything with the help of a fork, adding a little 'time to warm water.

The other window is for fresh yeast:
  With fresh yeast PANEANGELI
  Dissolve the fresh yeast in 50 ml of warm water.
  Sift the flour into a large bowl.
  At the center of the pile practicing a hole and pour the yeast, sugar, salt and oil.
  Mix everything with the help of a fork, adding a little 'time to the remaining lukewarm water.

Hope this helps.


« Last Edit: August 12, 2010, 12:29:01 PM by BrickStoneOven »

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 20222
  • Location: Dutch Country, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: PANEANGELI Lievito Di Birra Mastro Fornaio for pizza?
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2010, 12:40:57 PM »
Jackie Tran,

Thanks for your ideas and suggestions.  You are always into experimenting like I am. I think you even experiment more than I do.  :-D

Norma

BrickStoneOven,

Wow, I am glad you can translate.  :) Thatís interesting that this is dehydrated yeast made from fresh yeast.  I never heard of that before.  I wish they would buy a yeast like this in my area.  That would be convenient to be able to buy dried yeast, that would produce a pizza like fresh yeast.  Itís also interesting that this yeast doesnít need to be rehydrated and can be mixed right into the flour with sugar. That is great you translated the "Pizza Margherita", I will try this yeast with the pizza recipe you have given me in the next week.

Thanks for taking the time to translate this and explaining how to go about using this yeast and also translating the pizza recipe.  :)

I will report back on this thread how the pizza turns out.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21165
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: PANEANGELI Lievito Di Birra Mastro Fornaio for pizza?
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2010, 01:22:49 PM »
Norma,

I believe that what the translation says is that the Paneangeli yeast is what we call instant dry yeast. As you can read from the theartisan.net discussion on yeast, at http://home.earthlink.net/~ggda/The_Artisan_Yeast_Treatise_Section_One.htm#Yeasts%20Available%20to%20Bakers, both IDY and ADY start out as fresh yeast.

Peter

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 20222
  • Location: Dutch Country, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: PANEANGELI Lievito Di Birra Mastro Fornaio for pizza?
« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2010, 01:59:32 PM »
Peter,

Thanks for referencing that article about yeast.  I read that article over different times, but canít remember all what is said.  I find this part of the article interesting.
Yeast propagation proceeds in a series of increasingly larger sanitized tank fermenters. This large-scale fermentation continues under controlled conditions of continuous nutrient addition, temperature control, and optimum aeration. Conditions of growth affect how fast yeast multiplies and how much protein and carbohydrate it accumulates. For instance, rapid growth usually results in yeast with higher protein and enzymes, lower carbohydrates, higher initial activity and lower stability. Alternatively, slow growth usually results in yeast with lower protein and enzymes, higher carbohydrates, lower initial activity, and higher stability.

When all of the nutrients have been consumed, the yeast cells are separated from the remaining nutrient matter by centrifugation (separator). They are then washed and recentrifuged to yield a creamy suspension of pure, active yeast known as "yeast cream" which has a solids (yeast cells) content of approximately 15-18%. From this stage, a series of manufacturing processes take place that prepares the yeast for its final form.   
       
Years ago I had a decent microscope and wish I would have kept it.  It might have been able to help me see what different kind of yeasts look like when they are fermenting.  In my former life when I worked at RCA, then changed to GE, and finally changed to Burle Industries, I did work under a very powerful microscope sometimes and that was very interesting.  That microscope might have helped me see what is going on more.  That darn microscope usually gave me a headache if I was using it too long.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!