Author Topic: Viva La Focaccia!  (Read 4884 times)

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Offline Matthew

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Viva La Focaccia!
« on: August 14, 2010, 04:11:21 PM »
Focaccia Genovese; originale e con cipolla.



Offline psient

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Re: Viva La Focaccia!
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2010, 09:11:13 AM »
I'm impressed ;D. My most hydrated formula possesses a value of 111%. I never had a problem using the KA. The Globe will handle this in the same or better fashion :chef:.

Do you have a cross/section pic revealing the crumb structure for the rise in the voids of the sulci?

Thanks,

Jon

Offline Matthew

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Re: Viva La Focaccia!
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2010, 09:19:46 AM »
I'm impressed ;D. My most hydrated formula possesses a value of 111%. I never had a problem using the KA. The Globe will handle this in the same or better fashion :chef:.

Do you have a cross/section pic revealing the crumb structure for the rise in the voids of the sulci?

Thanks,

Jon

Thanks Jon.  No, I don't have a cross section of these; I brought them to a dinner party.

Matt

Offline MD205

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Re: Viva La Focaccia!
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2010, 08:45:19 PM »
Scrumptious!!!

Can you share your dough recipe and also your cooking method?  I have a WFO which I use for pizza but am a little intimidated to use it to make focaccia or a calzone for that matter.

Thanks -

Offline Matthew

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Re: Viva La Focaccia!
« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2010, 06:37:47 AM »
Scrumptious!!!

Can you share your dough recipe and also your cooking method?  I have a WFO which I use for pizza but am a little intimidated to use it to make focaccia or a calzone for that matter.

Thanks -

63-65% water
2-2.5% salt
2.5%-4% CY (depending on time of year)
5-6% EVOO
1% Malt

•Mix room temperature water with salt, malt, & oil
•Add half the flour & mix until a dense dough is formed
•Add yeast & remaining water & continue mixing until ready
•Remove mixture from mixer & let rest covered on well flour board for 15-20 minutes
•Do 1 or 2 single folds (back to front) & gently shape dough to form a rectangular
•Divide the dough & place in a well oiled pan
•Cover entire surface with oil & let proof at 30° for 1 hour
•Press the dough in the pan with fingertips evenly to cover entire surface
•Lightly salt the entire surface & let proof for 30 minutes
•Place some tepid water (30) over top entire suface & do the same with some EVOO
•Depress dough with fingertips to form dimples. Dimples should be filled with water & oil mixture
•Dress with desired toppings
•Let rest an additional 60-75 minutes before baking
•Gently load in preheated oven & bake for 15-20 minutes at 450º
•When ready, remove from pan & place on cooling rack
•Brush entire surface with EVOO

Matt

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Viva La Focaccia!
« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2010, 09:17:31 AM »
Matt,

What flour or flour blend and weight are you using, and are the temperatures other than the 450 degrees bake temperature Celsius rather than Fahrenheit?

Peter

Offline Matthew

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Re: Viva La Focaccia!
« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2010, 10:22:46 AM »
Hi Peter,
I have used Caputo only, Manitoba only & a combination of both with varying percentages.  My preference is 100% Manitoba.  I typically use 650 grams of dough in a pan that measures 11.25"x17". The baking is done in a convection oven at 430-450F.  The key to making great focaccia is to respect the proofing periods.

Matt

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Re: Viva La Focaccia!
« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2010, 10:50:27 AM »
Matt,

Thank you.

You mentioned a proof temperature of 30 degrees and using tepid water at 30 degrees. I assume you mean 30 degrees Celsius rather than 30 degrees Fahrenheit, which would be below freezing. The conversion from Celsius to Fahrenheit would be 86 degrees F.

Peter

Offline Matthew

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Re: Viva La Focaccia!
« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2010, 11:37:45 AM »
Yes Peter that is correct. The use of the warm water is to not disturb the proofing by shocking the dough temperature with cool water. The same consideration should also be given to the toppings.


 

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