Author Topic: Experiment with frozen dough  (Read 5540 times)

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Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Experiment with frozen dough
« Reply #25 on: September 07, 2010, 09:38:33 PM »
So typically is there no smoke up in the dome or just a little is normal?

First off, I can only do what any of us can.....report on what I have seen. Like many of you, I am very observant of what is going on in a pizzeria. That being said, I have no idea what is "normal".

From looking at ovens, there is indeed usually some smoke present in the top of the dome, but it is typically moving out of the oven and into the chimney. Smoke sitting at the top of the dome like some mini smog cloud is likely an indication of poor air flow in the oven....and air flow is good for hot flames, as well as good air flow and convection through the refractory chamber.

Again, this is solely from limited observation. --K
"It's Baltimore, gentlemen, the gods will not save you." --Burrell


Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Experiment with frozen dough
« Reply #26 on: September 07, 2010, 09:59:09 PM »
Good point. The smoke I saw was always moving.  But a 70s bake is pretty hot and fast.

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Experiment with frozen dough
« Reply #27 on: September 08, 2010, 09:29:00 PM »
John, I finally got my first black plague pie thanks to you.  I tried the long cold ferment, frozen and thawed dough and it worked.  I couldn't be happier!  ;D

I wrote about it in my almost-wfo-politans thread, but here's a picture for ya as well. 


Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Experiment with frozen dough
« Reply #28 on: September 09, 2010, 08:57:31 AM »
Great job Chau!

RE: Smoke - from my limited experience with my WFO, the smoke is not a factor at all in stopping radiant heat from above. The only time there is much smoke anyway is when a new log is put on the coals. The reason you do not have enough radiant heat from above has to do with dome height and oven design (as far as neapolitan-style ovens go).

And once you have the oven going - at least in a round, neapolitan style oven - the coals are pushed to the right or left or INHIBIT the flow of air, and therefore heat, out the chimney. The heat rises up the rounded sides and flows back down. If the coals were in the back, then the heat would flow right out the chimney. This is something I learned here on the board in the first days of owning my WFO.

John

Offline Oceans05

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Re: Experiment with frozen dough
« Reply #29 on: June 16, 2013, 01:17:51 AM »
Bringing up an old thread here, I recently found this after my "beautiful accident?"

I had the same exact experience as John had posted, by pure accident.

I prepared my dough for a 24hour cold ferment, then froze the dough for almost 2 weeks. The day before I prepared the dough I put it in the fridge, then let it come to room temp for about 45 min before shaping. I posted about my experience here: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11654.300.html

All this time I thought it was the new technique of using the broil method, it was the first time I had done it.

The dough tasted slightly undercooked on the inside, but it did not have a bad taste at all. It was very good, cooked 2:20 min

The results were:



 

pizzapan