Author Topic: Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International  (Read 8373 times)

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Offline Pigslips

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Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International
« on: August 16, 2010, 01:10:48 PM »
I bought Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International and have a few questions from those here that have worked with these.  1. Which of the two did you like the best?  Did you find one of them easier or harder to work with than the other?  2.  From reading here I would think it would be better to activate one culture at a time? 3. Does it matter which flour to use or whether it should be high gluten or not?  I’m reading “Sourdough tips” from King Arthur flour and this looks to be good advice, comments?  http://www.kingarthurflour.com/tips/sourdough-tips.html  ok all thanks


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Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International
« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2010, 01:50:55 PM »
I bought Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International and have a few questions from those here that have worked with these.  1. Which of the two did you like the best?  Did you find one of them easier or harder to work with than the other?  2.  From reading here I would think it would be better to activate one culture at a time? 3. Does it matter which flour to use or whether it should be high gluten or not?  I’m reading “Sourdough tips” from King Arthur flour and this looks to be good advice, comments?  http://www.kingarthurflour.com/tips/sourdough-tips.html  ok all thanks


1. They respond differently to different conditions. I'm several years into using them and am still learning. You'll have to decide yourself which one is "best".

2. One at a time. Contamination during the early stages of activation is the biggest concern.

3. I used KAAP for all my activations.

Offline AZ-Buckeye

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Re: Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2010, 02:28:48 PM »
I've activated both the Ischia and the Camandoli.  I no longer keep the Camandoli because I liked the way the Ischia responded.  But this is probably something you need to decide for yourself.  I also used KAAP to activate and use it to feed weekly (even though I use Caputo to make my pizza dough).

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International
« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2010, 03:47:57 PM »
I keep them both going, but I definitely prefer the Ischia. I used KAAP to activate. I use either KAAP or KABF to feed - whichever is handy.

Craig
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Offline Pigslips

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Re: Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International
« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2010, 01:21:40 PM »
I'm starting activation soon. In Ed's book under "activating the dry culture" he states on line 4., Continue feeding both jars about 12 hour intervals, ok so how many intervals or what to look for so one knows when to stop?

Another question please.  Would this work for activation?
http://www.kingarthurflour.com/tips/sourdough-tips.html
« Last Edit: September 10, 2010, 01:37:33 PM by Pigslips »
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Offline Matthew

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Re: Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International
« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2010, 05:20:05 PM »
I'm starting activation soon. In Ed's book under "activating the dry culture" he states on line 4., Continue feeding both jars about 12 hour intervals, ok so how many intervals or what to look for so one knows when to stop?

Another question please.  Would this work for activation?
http://www.kingarthurflour.com/tips/sourdough-tips.html


Keep discarding & feeding until the starter increases in volume by at least 2 inches within 2-3 hour of the previous feeding.  If you want to decrease your chance of contamination use half the amount of flour & water that he recommends for the initial feeding.  I just finished activating another starter (San Francisco) & did this.  This is the 1st time ever that my starter was not contaminated after the initial feeding.  It's also very important to keep the temperature high (85-90 degrees) for the first proofing to reduce the likelyhood of contamination.  Continue the rest of your feeding between 75-80 degrees.  If your culture has big soapy looking bubbles it's probably become too acidic.  Do another feeding & proof at room temperature.  If the activity is inhibited or you still have the big soapy bubbles then you will have to give it a wash.  This may or may not happen; I'm just preparing you.

Matt
« Last Edit: September 10, 2010, 06:54:08 PM by Matthew »

Offline Pigslips

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Re: Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International
« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2010, 05:54:28 PM »
If you want to decrease your chance of contamination use half the amount of flour & water that he recommends for the initial feeding. 

This would be the 24 hour feeding?

Thanks for the info-help. :pizza:
« Last Edit: September 10, 2010, 05:58:14 PM by Pigslips »
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Offline Matthew

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Re: Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International
« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2010, 06:54:31 PM »
This would be the 24 hour feeding?

Thanks for the info-help. :pizza:

Yes, the initial feeding.

Matt

Offline ponzu

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Re: Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International
« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2010, 10:47:28 PM »
One method of activation that has worked really well for me is boiling a pot of water (the amount you'd use for a pot of spaghetti) and putting the pot in the oven with the initial culture feeding. 

24 hours later you take it to room temp and feed every 12 hours until it explodes 3 inches within  hours.  one to 2 feedings with this method.

It's not as bakerlike, or precise as the sourdo instructions with a proofing box, but it really works.  And it seems to work faster than the proofing box method.

AZ

This works for waking up dormant starter too.

I like both the camoldoli and the ischia.  The ischia is more pugent, fragrant, and a more vigorous riser, but the calmoldoli is more subtle, buttery, and mild.

« Last Edit: September 10, 2010, 11:15:22 PM by ponzu »

Offline Pigslips

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Re: Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International
« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2010, 11:02:48 PM »
One method of activation that has worked really well for me is boiling a pot of water (the amount you'd use for a pot of spaghetti) and putting the pot in the oven with the initial culture feeding.  24 hours later you take it to room temp and feed every 12 hours until it explodes 3 inches within  hours.

Ok, do you just boil say 2 quarts of water just once, place in a closed oven with the the culture for 24 hours?
Lid on or off?
« Last Edit: September 10, 2010, 11:09:27 PM by Pigslips »
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Offline ponzu

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Re: Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International
« Reply #10 on: September 11, 2010, 12:11:32 AM »
That's right.  lid off.

I can only tell you that this has worked very well for me 2 of the 4 times I have activated a starter fron sourdo.com.  (the other times i have used a proofing box which also worked.  I will feel terrible if it doesn't work for you.  But this is how I will activate all of my future starters.

I'm not a baker by nature.  I'm more of a cook.  I lack precision. :chef:

Good luck and let me know if it works for you.

AZ

Offline Pigslips

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Re: Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International
« Reply #11 on: September 11, 2010, 01:27:21 AM »
That's right.  lid off.  I can only tell you that this has worked very well for me 2 of the 4 times I have activated a starter fron sourdo.com.  (the other times i have used a proofing box which also worked.  I will feel terrible if it doesn't work for you.  But this is how I will activate all of my future starters.  I'm not a baker by nature.  I'm more of a cook.  I lack precision. :chef: Good luck and let me know if it works for you.  AZ

I will thanks, here's a quickie box (bucket)  I did.  If it doesn't work for proofing, I can always kick it!   :o
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Offline norma427

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Re: Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International
« Reply #12 on: September 11, 2010, 07:36:19 AM »
I am not an expert on activating starters, but here is the link to when I recently activated my starters.  I made the mistake of trying to activate both at once, but luckily I didn’t contaminate them.  You can see how my starters behaved day by day and how other forum members helped me though the activation.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11578.msg106188.html#msg106188

Norma
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Offline Pigslips

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Re: Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International
« Reply #13 on: September 11, 2010, 12:46:19 PM »
We started activation mixing at 9AM PCT. done by 9:10 AM PCT.  No metal used during mixing.  Lid was place on top of jar but not screwed down.  Using just the Ischia Island culture.  We went with Matt somewhat and used only ˝ cup  Caputo ‘00’ Pizzeria flour and ˝ cup room temp. filtered water.  Went into the "bucket" at 85' set for 90".  We have a small window on our bucket for viewing.  Check back in 24 hours.   :chef:
« Last Edit: September 11, 2010, 08:16:01 PM by Pigslips »
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Offline Matthew

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Re: Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International
« Reply #14 on: September 11, 2010, 01:38:02 PM »
  No metal used during mixing. 

What's wrong with metal?  I always use metal especially when activating as you want to mix as vigorous as possible & nothing does a better job than a danish dough hook.

Matt

Offline Pigslips

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Re: Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International
« Reply #15 on: September 11, 2010, 06:24:38 PM »
What's wrong with metal?  I always use metal especially when activating as you want to mix as vigorous as possible & nothing does a better job than a danish dough hook. Matt

I thought I had read such, but I could not find anything on doing so, maybe I'm spending too much time in the wine & beer forum.  ::)
At any rate the scraper did a nice job, I hope.  :-[
Now I know!! It's storing cultures, no metal!!! ;)
« Last Edit: September 11, 2010, 06:43:04 PM by Pigslips »
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Offline Pigslips

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Re: Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International
« Reply #16 on: September 12, 2010, 12:32:54 PM »
This is our first 12 hour feed.  The first picture is the culture as it came out of the proofing bucket.  The temperature in the bucket stayed right at 86-87 during the 24 hour activation.  The culture at the take out time had small bubbles threw out the mix.  The smell was a very pleasant floury yeasty smell.  I tasted it and again a very pronounced flour taste almost sweet.  The second picture is the culture with 1 cup Caputo ‘00’ Pizzeria flour and about ˝ cup slightly warm filtered water.  The culture is now out at 70’ to 71’ room temperature.  Ok, see you in 12 hours for a second feed.  Question, does anyone ever get done after say the second feed? :chef:
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Offline Matthew

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Re: Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International
« Reply #17 on: September 12, 2010, 01:07:49 PM »
Question, does anyone ever get done after say the second feed? :chef:

You have quite a ways to go yet my friend.  Why did you split it so soon?

Offline Pigslips

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Re: Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International
« Reply #18 on: September 12, 2010, 01:45:37 PM »
You have quite a ways to go yet my friend.  Why did you split it so soon?

Not split, the first pic is before 1st feeding, second pic is after 1st feeding.  I don't split til tonight after the second feed.   :chef:
As of right now about two hours after the first feeding the culture has grown at least and inch in the jar.  The room temp is staying at 71'.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2010, 02:01:38 PM by Pigslips »
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Offline Matthew

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Re: Italian cultures from Sourdoughs International
« Reply #19 on: September 12, 2010, 02:31:29 PM »
Not split, the first pic is before 1st feeding, second pic is after 1st feeding.  I don't split til tonight after the second feed.   :chef:
As of right now about two hours after the first feeding the culture has grown at least and inch in the jar.  The room temp is staying at 71'.

Sorry, my mistake.