Author Topic: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor  (Read 7968 times)

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Offline sonofapizza

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #25 on: August 25, 2010, 08:42:26 PM »
I am glad I joined the forum.  To be in the company of individuals who are striving for similar results, is great for me.  I'll be honest though, I get a little intimidated when it comes to scaling recipies up or down.  I can't wait to give that 'Dough Calculator' a swing.  I need to start learning how to get technical with my measurments.  I truly want to recreate the same pie over and over.

Brother Jimmy was kind enough to be one of the few old school pizza guys to part with his wisdom.  I may be incorrect with the scaled down measurments.  I do get oil happy.  I've gotta call him tonight and get a direct idea of how much oil he actually uses.  But, we're talkin' about a guy who uses a "golf-ball" sized piece of fresh yeast and just tosses it in the Hobart.  He says the water temp doesnt really matter (its already hot as Hell in that kitchen of his).  So he just uses filtered water through the whole restaurant, and he absolutely always laughs at the concept of great pizza being defined by it's "crappy local tap water".  he always says, "you want NY style water?  Just add flouride and chlorine to your water...cause dats what they use ta kill all dat crap in their local tap water.."

I just called him to verify the old recepie...Here is what he siad:

Here is his 50lb doudh recepie from the shop: I wrote this down 4 years ago - paper still has oil stain and rock hard dough residue on it...)
1oz fresh yeast ("golfball sized")
1 cup of salt
4 cups Olive Oil
.......3 empty cans of water....from the large 7/11 crushed tomatoes can..what ever the hell amount that is (300grams x 3 cans?).
wisk it all together and let it sit for 5-10 minutes.
Then 50lb bag of KYROL.

He says, "I don't put sugar in NOTHin'"...Which should put a smile on all diabetics' faces...  But horrify those poor unfortunate, Gluten Intolerent souls...roaming the Earth...unable to enjoy slices of Heaven.

Please, if you can, let me know what technical specs of his 50lb dough recipie is

Thanks again for all your critiques and compliments.  I am really learning now.

-Theo.
 
« Last Edit: August 25, 2010, 08:50:54 PM by sonofapizza »


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #26 on: August 25, 2010, 08:59:59 PM »
Theo,

If someone has an empty #10 Stanislaus 7/11 can and can tare it and weigh the amount of water needed to fill it, it should be fairly easy to scale that recipe down.

FYI, four cups of olive oil for 50 pounds of flour comes to 3.81%.

Do you know offhand how much dough is used to make a given pizza size? If you have multiple dough ball weights for different size pizzas, so much the better.

Peter

« Last Edit: August 25, 2010, 09:13:05 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline sonofapizza

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #27 on: August 25, 2010, 09:13:52 PM »
That dough calculator is only in percentages...  Difficulty figuring it out
The 7/11 cans say 300grams on the label.  I would imagine that water wouldnt differ too much in weight... But I dont want to half-ass anything anymore.  My digital scale goes up to 10 lbs.  I'll have to carefully weigh everything out sometime this week.  Forgive my ignorance on the subject...  I can operate a full fledge recording studio, but I can't figure out grams from pounds from ounces....  Maybe it's time to give one of my old pot-dealing college buddies a call, to break it all down for me :D I know they'd probably say, "Duuuuuude...you've come to the right place, bro......  16oz to a pound, eight eighths to an oz....etc;"
« Last Edit: August 25, 2010, 09:17:30 PM by sonofapizza »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #28 on: August 25, 2010, 09:20:04 PM »
Theo,

All of the dough calculating tools (see http://www.pizzamaking.com/dough_tools.html) are based on baker's percents. It's far easier to scale recipes using weights rather than volumes. I'm sure you can grasp the math with a little effort. For a couple of basic articles on baker's percents, see http://www.kingarthurflour.com/professional/bakerspercentage.pdf and the multi-part tutorial at http://www.wildyeastblog.com/2008/03/22/bakers-percentage-1/.

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #29 on: August 25, 2010, 09:22:03 PM »
I'll have to carefully weigh everything out sometime this week.

Theo,

I only need the weight of the water in one #10 7/11 can. I have conversion data for everything else.

Peter

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #30 on: August 25, 2010, 10:32:05 PM »
Peter and Theo,

I had an empty can of 7/11.  I just brought it in from the recycle bin and weighed the can tared out with water.

The water in the 7/11 can weighs 3032 grams.

Norma

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #31 on: August 25, 2010, 10:38:56 PM »
I just weighed the water in the can again, filled to the very top, and the weight is now 3114 grams.  I don't know how to go about deciding which one of these weighs should be used.

Norma

buceriasdon

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #32 on: August 25, 2010, 10:39:57 PM »
Go metric. Much easier to calculate.
Don


That dough calculator is only in percentages...  Difficulty figuring it out
The 7/11 cans say 300grams on the label.  I would imagine that water wouldnt differ too much in weight... But I dont want to half-ass anything anymore.  My digital scale goes up to 10 lbs.  I'll have to carefully weigh everything out sometime this week.  Forgive my ignorance on the subject...  I can operate a full fledge recording studio, but I can't figure out grams from pounds from ounces....  Maybe it's time to give one of my old pot-dealing college buddies a call, to break it all down for me :D I know they'd probably say, "Duuuuuude...you've come to the right place, bro......  16oz to a pound, eight eighths to an oz....etc;"

Offline Essen1

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #33 on: August 26, 2010, 12:03:46 AM »
Quote
I just weighed the water in the can again, filled to the very top, and the weight is now 3114 grams.  I don't know how to go about deciding which one of these weighs should be used.

You might have added more water then you did in your first weighing hence the difference of 82 grams. It doesn't take much of water to get a difference of 82 grams.
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein


Offline Essen1

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #34 on: August 26, 2010, 12:12:45 AM »
Theo, if the recipe isn't secret, would you mind sharing it?

Scotty123,

I have followed your threads and advice for quite some time and find them all very refreshing, informative and usable. I also like the way you critique some members efforts and try to help them advance in their pizza making abilities...Kudos and Thumbs up! All of us can learn from it...I know I have.

You also intrigued me to look into a soapstone replacement for my old cordierite stone. But I have one question to ask...I'd love to have your personal dough recipe and would like to see a pic of one of your finished pies!  ;D

Given all the info you have dispersed so far, I'm dying to see how you do it. Perhaps post a video from start to finish on YouTube??? Man, that would be greatly appreciated.

Or even some pics on here would do the trick.

Looking forward to it...and I'm sure many other members, too.  :chef:

P.S.: Don't forget to include your sauce recipe!
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

Offline sonofapizza

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #35 on: August 26, 2010, 02:28:21 AM »
Peter and Theo,

I had an empty can of 7/11.  I just brought it in from the recycle bin and weighed the can tared out with water.

The water in the 7/11 can weighs 3032 grams.

Norma

You go Norma!

Offline sonofapizza

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #36 on: August 26, 2010, 03:28:15 AM »
Ok...  I figured out the Lehman's Calculator and made the best dough I've made in my life yet.  Dough didn't even stick to the bottom of the mixing bowl.  negligible bowl residue amount... I've never had that happen before.  The balls weighed .3oz less than the calculator said though - followed everything to the 'T'.  regardless, these are the most pizzeria-like dough balls I've ever made at home.  Thank you...

I will make two pies tomorrow night after the fridge does it's magic.  Here is the calculator screen shot:
« Last Edit: August 26, 2010, 03:42:32 AM by sonofapizza »

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #37 on: August 26, 2010, 06:42:02 AM »
Scotty123,

I have followed your threads and advice for quite some time and find them all very refreshing, informative and usable. I also like the way you critique some members efforts and try to help them advance in their pizza making abilities...Kudos and Thumbs up! All of us can learn from it...I know I have.

You also intrigued me to look into a soapstone replacement for my old cordierite stone. But I have one question to ask...I'd love to have your personal dough recipe and would like to see a pic of one of your finished pies!  ;D

Given all the info you have dispersed so far, I'm dying to see how you do it. Perhaps post a video from start to finish on YouTube??? Man, that would be greatly appreciated.

Or even some pics on here would do the trick.

Looking forward to it...and I'm sure many other members, too.  :chef:

P.S.: Don't forget to include your sauce recipe!

Mike, thank you for your very kind words.  I have followed your threads and valued your contribution as well.

I've been kind of procrastinating on the camera front- alright, fine, I've been really procrastinating on the camera front  :-D I keep waiting for the prices on the Flip style cameras to come down- they keep adding more features, though, so I think the $170ish price tag is here to stay.  Just this second, I popped over to ebay to see what kind of deals there were on a Flip ultrahd and the prices seemed reasonable. That's probably the route I'll take. I'm going to keep my eye out a little longer, but I promise you, you'll have video from me soon. And it will be my entire process in tremendous detail- soup to nuts.

As far as my sauce recipe goes... that I probably won't be sharing  :( Although I have my eye on consulting professionally as well as possibly catering large events, a part of me is hoping to eventually have my own place.  I have no issues with my dough recipe floating around (it's honestly almost always changing anyway), but, because of the hyper competitive nature of the pizza business in the NY area, I feel like I need to keep my sauce cards close to my chest.

As I'm sure you're aware, though, I do suffer from a really bad case of male answer syndrome and can't keep my mouth shut, so, if someone really wanted my sauce, my old posts reveal pretty much all the details.  I spent more than a decade reverse engineering the sauce of my favorite local pizzeria, but, at the end of the day, it's not rocket science.  The tomato should be the main player- everything else is just there to supplement the tomato flavor, not detract from it.  I'm also a very firm believer in fresh garlic, not dried and that dried basil is an abomination.

Thanks again.

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #38 on: August 26, 2010, 07:05:55 AM »
You might have added more water then you did in your first weighing hence the difference of 82 grams. It doesn't take much of water to get a difference of 82 grams.

Mike,

I can understand that it doesn't take much water to get a difference of 82 grams. Thanks  :)

I weighed the container with water again after I last posted and saw my scales goes to kg. I didn't know that before, because I never weighed anything that heavy before.  What I thought was grams was really kg.  :-D  I checked the weight of the sauce on the label of the can and it was 2.98 kg.  I only then took the water to where the sauce usually is and the water also weighed 2.98 kg.  Sorry for any confusion I caused.

Norma

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #39 on: August 26, 2010, 07:21:24 AM »
I will make two pies tomorrow night after the fridge does it's magic.  Here is the calculator screen shot:

I think you're in good shape, Theo.  The only thing I'd adjust, as I mentioned before, is the thickness factor.  10 oz. is a bit too much dough for a 13" pie- at least a 13" pie that resembles the pie that you're striving for in your avatar. I really hate launching a pie that's close to the size of my stone, but if you can try stretching these to 14" I think you'll be better off.

Offline jever4321

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #40 on: August 26, 2010, 08:40:59 AM »
Mike, thank you for your very kind words.  I have followed your threads and valued your contribution as well.

I've been kind of procrastinating on the camera front- alright, fine, I've been really procrastinating on the camera front  :-D I keep waiting for the prices on the Flip style cameras to come down- they keep adding more features, though, so I think the $170ish price tag is here to stay.  Just this second, I popped over to ebay to see what kind of deals there were on a Flip ultrahd and the prices seemed reasonable. That's probably the route I'll take. I'm going to keep my eye out a little longer, but I promise you, you'll have video from me soon. And it will be my entire process in tremendous detail- soup to nuts.

As far as my sauce recipe goes... that I probably won't be sharing  :( Although I have my eye on consulting professionally as well as possibly catering large events, a part of me is hoping to eventually have my own place.  I have no issues with my dough recipe floating around (it's honestly almost always changing anyway), but, because of the hyper competitive nature of the pizza business in the NY area, I feel like I need to keep my sauce cards close to my chest.

As I'm sure you're aware, though, I do suffer from a really bad case of male answer syndrome and can't keep my mouth shut, so, if someone really wanted my sauce, my old posts reveal pretty much all the details.  I spent more than a decade reverse engineering the sauce of my favorite local pizzeria, but, at the end of the day, it's not rocket science.  The tomato should be the main player- everything else is just there to supplement the tomato flavor, not detract from it.  I'm also a very firm believer in fresh garlic, not dried and that dried basil is an abomination.

Thanks again.
Scott, if you wanted to open a NY style pizzeria, I think you should consider the central Ohio area, maybe the northwest side of Columbus. I think Dublin OH would be perfect. There is a serious pizza deficiency there. ;D
-Jay

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #41 on: August 26, 2010, 10:01:19 AM »
Theo,

When you use the Lehmann dough calculating tool, and you are using a basic home stand mixer, like a KitchenAid stand mixer, my advice is to use a bowl residue factor of 1.5%. That will usually yield a dough ball that is a bit larger than you are targeting but the dough ball can be trimmed back to the desired weight.

I think that there may be a problem with the dough formulation you posted in Reply 25 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,11684.msg108030.html#msg108030 or else there is some missing information somewhere. I took the 2.98 kg weight figure Norma provided for the water in one 7/11 can and multiplied that by three (for three cans worth). That gives us 8.94 kg, or 8940 grams. That converts to 315.34 ounces (8940/28.35), or 19.71 (315.34/16) pounds. If the entire 50 pound bag of flour is used, the baker's percent for the water comes to 19.41/50 = 39.42%. That figure would be far too low for a NY style. Also, with respect to the fresh yeast, the corresponding baker's percent would be 1/(50 x 16) = 0.125%. That value, also, would be too low in my opinion. Do you think it is possible that only enough flour is added to make a total dough batch weight of 50 pounds? I haven't run the numbers on this scenario but can once you have a chance to respond to clarify. It is also possible that the water in the can doesn't come right up to the top since that would be cumbersome to handle.

Peter


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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #42 on: August 26, 2010, 10:34:16 AM »
Scott, if you wanted to open a NY style pizzeria, I think you should consider the central Ohio area, maybe the northwest side of Columbus. I think Dublin OH would be perfect. There is a serious pizza deficiency there. ;D

Thanks for the invite, but I'll always be in a New York state of mind  ;D I'd chew off a limb before I'd drive into Manhattan, but, other than that, I consider this sacred ground.  Food means everything to me, and although I've got pizza on the brain, I also occasionally worship at the Indian and Chinese restaurant altar.  I've made pretty good strides with chicken and broccoli, but until I can make a kick butt chicken tikka masala myself, I can never leave  :)

Offline Essen1

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #43 on: August 26, 2010, 12:09:16 PM »
Mike, thank you for your very kind words.  I have followed your threads and valued your contribution as well.

I've been kind of procrastinating on the camera front- alright, fine, I've been really procrastinating on the camera front  :-D I keep waiting for the prices on the Flip style cameras to come down- they keep adding more features, though, so I think the $170ish price tag is here to stay.  Just this second, I popped over to ebay to see what kind of deals there were on a Flip ultrahd and the prices seemed reasonable. That's probably the route I'll take. I'm going to keep my eye out a little longer, but I promise you, you'll have video from me soon. And it will be my entire process in tremendous detail- soup to nuts.

As far as my sauce recipe goes... that I probably won't be sharing  :( Although I have my eye on consulting professionally as well as possibly catering large events, a part of me is hoping to eventually have my own place.  I have no issues with my dough recipe floating around (it's honestly almost always changing anyway), but, because of the hyper competitive nature of the pizza business in the NY area, I feel like I need to keep my sauce cards close to my chest.

As I'm sure you're aware, though, I do suffer from a really bad case of male answer syndrome and can't keep my mouth shut, so, if someone really wanted my sauce, my old posts reveal pretty much all the details.  I spent more than a decade reverse engineering the sauce of my favorite local pizzeria, but, at the end of the day, it's not rocket science.  The tomato should be the main player- everything else is just there to supplement the tomato flavor, not detract from it.  I'm also a very firm believer in fresh garlic, not dried and that dried basil is an abomination.

Thanks again.

Aha...looks like we're getting somewhere with your sauce recipe  ;)

In regards to the cam...I saw the Flip cam UHD at Best Buy for a $147. You might want to jump on that if it has all the features you need. But the price may still come down, who knows.

Good luck with your endeavor of opening your own shop. NY is a tough market.


Norma,

I hear you. I made the same mistake when I first got my new digitial scale and it screwed things up for me royally. That's life, though.  ;D
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #44 on: August 26, 2010, 12:57:58 PM »
Norma,

I hear you. I made the same mistake when I first got my new digitial scale and it screwed things up for me royally. That's life, though.  ;D

Mike,

Thanks for telling me I am not the only one that has messed up measuring ingredients in the past.
At least it makes me feel better.  :)

Norma

Offline jever4321

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #45 on: August 26, 2010, 01:17:41 PM »
Thanks for the invite, but I'll always be in a New York state of mind  ;D I'd chew off a limb before I'd drive into Manhattan, but, other than that, I consider this sacred ground.  Food means everything to me, and although I've got pizza on the brain, I also occasionally worship at the Indian and Chinese restaurant altar.  I've made pretty good strides with chicken and broccoli, but until I can make a kick butt chicken tikka masala myself, I can never leave  :)
I understand. I went through a food depression when I moved here 20 years ago. It's getting better, but the pizza is god awful. It's my opinion that a good NY style pizza joint around here would be a slam dunk because there is NO competition. It would be like shooting fish in a barrel.
-Jay

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #46 on: August 26, 2010, 04:16:44 PM »
I understand. I went through a food depression when I moved here 20 years ago. It's getting better, but the pizza is god awful. It's my opinion that a good NY style pizza joint around here would be a slam dunk because there is NO competition. It would be like shooting fish in a barrel.

Jay, with a few tweaks and a little more practice, you're not that far from making the quintessential NY pie.  How about opening a place yourself?

Offline jever4321

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #47 on: August 26, 2010, 05:02:18 PM »
Jay, with a few tweaks and a little more practice, you're not that far from making the quintessential NY pie.  How about opening a place yourself?
Thanks for the compliment. I think i'm further than you think... Plus, my wife already thinks I'm a pizza nut job. I guess it all boils down to $$$ and time. Both are in short supply... :-\
« Last Edit: August 26, 2010, 05:03:51 PM by jever4321 »
-Jay

Offline sonofapizza

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #48 on: August 26, 2010, 08:00:21 PM »
That gives us 8.94 kg, or 8940 grams. That converts to 315.34 ounces (8940/28.35), or 19.71 (315.34/16) pounds. If the entire 50 pound bag of flour is used, the baker's percent for the water comes to 19.41/50 = 39.42%. That figure would be far too low for a NY style. Also, with respect to the fresh yeast, the corresponding baker's percent would be 1/(50 x 16) = 0.125%. That value, also, would be too low in my opinion. Do you think it is possible that only enough flour is added to make a total dough batch weight of 50 pounds?

Peter

Peter.  It is very possibly that the total weight could be 50lbs.  Jimmy is a mad man, sometimes getting a straight answer outta him can be difficult.  But, he has been my only source of pizza making info until lately.

However, these are the results (pics) from the Lehmann NY calculator batch I made last night.  I cooked these today.  Oven @ 550 degrees.  Overnight refridgerated doughballs.  Took 7-8 minutes maybe a couple minutes too long, as they were chewy in texture.  14" pies.  take a look
« Last Edit: August 26, 2010, 08:05:42 PM by sonofapizza »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: My latest NYC Pizzeria style endeavor
« Reply #49 on: August 27, 2010, 12:09:02 PM »
Theo,

I decided to take the information you got from Jimmy and to assume that he meant a 50-pound batch of dough. Otherwise, the numbers won't work. So, operating on that premise, I used the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html (you can also use the Lehmann dough calculating tool) to come up with a possible dough formulation for a 50-pound batch of dough. Of all the numbers you gave, the ones that appear to be hard and fast and the least disputable are the amount of salt and the amount of oil. So, I built the dough formulation around those specific values. I also increased the amount of cake yeast to 0.75% because I do not believe that one ounce of cake yeast would be enough for a dough that is to be either used the same day or after one or more days of cold fermentation. Also, a golf-ball size of cake yeast would seem to weigh more than one ounce.

In addition to the above changes, I also used a hydration of 58%. That may seem to be on the low side but you will note that the oil in the dough formulation is 6.38%. I have worked with high oil doughs before and if you don't adjust the formula hydration to compensate for the wetness that a lot of oil brings to the dough, you can end up with a very wet dough that can be hard to handle. My practice is to use a combination of water and oil percents that is pretty much equal to the rated absorption value for the flour I am using. That is the same approach that Tom Lehmann recommends. I should also mention that using 58% hydration, the amount of water comes to about 88% of the value that Norma came up with when she weighed one #10 can (the empty Stanislaus 7/11 can) filled pretty much to the top with water. I would imagine that in practice a worker wouldn't completely fill the can with water because it would be cumbersome and awkward to handle the can with water at that level without spilling the water. I suspect that the worker would fill the can just to the point where it is easy to manage. So, the 88% figure doesn't seem to me to be out of whack.

Based on the above, I came up with the following dough formulation:

Flour (100%):
Water (58%):
CY (0.75%):
Salt (1.97%):
Olive Oil (6.37%):
Total (167.09%):
13573.52 g  |  478.78 oz | 29.92 lbs
7872.64 g  |  277.69 oz | 17.36 lbs
101.8 g | 3.59 oz | 0.22 lbs |
267.4 g | 9.43 oz | 0.59 lbs | 15.97 tbsp | 1 cups
864.63 g | 30.5 oz | 1.91 lbs | 64.05 tbsp | 4 cups
22680 g | 800 oz | 50 lbs | TF = N/A
Note: No bowl residue compensation

As I noted in the above dough formulation, I did not use a bowl residue compensation. However, if I were to use, say, 1.5%, which is the value I use at home to make my doughs in a stand mixer, the dough formulation becomes:

Flour (100%):
Water (58%):
CY (0.75%):
Salt (1.97%):
Olive Oil (6.37%):
Total (167.09%):
13777.13 g  |  485.97 oz | 30.37 lbs
7990.73 g  |  281.86 oz | 17.62 lbs
103.33 g | 3.64 oz | 0.23 lbs |
271.41 g | 9.57 oz | 0.6 lbs | 16.21 tbsp | 1.01 cups
877.6 g | 30.96 oz | 1.93 lbs | 65.01 tbsp | 4.06 cups
23020.2 g | 812 oz | 50.75 lbs | TF = N/A
Note: Bowl residue compensation = 1.5%

It is easy to scale either of the above dough formulations to any desired dough batch weight. However, to do so in a way as to replicate what Jimmy does, you would need to know a typical dough ball weight (or weighs for different size pizzas) and the corresponding pizza size(s). Otherwise, you can assume a thickness factor and, using the Thickness Factor option of the dough calculating tool, calculate the amount of ingredients you would need to make the dough for any size and number of pizzas. For example, a typical thickness factor for a NY style might be around 0.085.

It is also possible to redo the above dough formulations to use dry yeast. I can't find any fresh yeast (typically the 0.6 ounce cubes) in any store near me, so I use mainly IDY. Should you decide to try either of the above dough formulations and if you need help converting either or both of the above dough formulations to use either IDY or ADY, I can help you with that conversion (the baker's percents will be different for IDY and ADY).

With respect to the last pizza you made using the Lehmann dough calculating tool, I think I would use less yeast and a longer cold fermentation. That should produce more residual sugar for crust coloration purposes and create more byproducts of fermentation for better crust flavor and a better texture. It is up to you if you want to experiment with a lower thickness factor that is more typical of the NY style.

Peter