Author Topic: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza  (Read 113973 times)

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Offline buzz

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #20 on: April 13, 2005, 09:42:46 AM »
TBS.=very bad!

Try it again--I think you'll like the oil-based crust a lot better than using shortening!


Offline Randy

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #21 on: April 13, 2005, 10:09:49 AM »
I didn't get the thickness of the outside of the crust that I got when I used an equal amount of oil.  That is 1/4 cup of oil or Crisco for two, ten-inch pizzas.

Randy

Offline buzz

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #22 on: April 13, 2005, 10:40:08 AM »
That's very odd, because with my recipe it comes out just a like restaurant-style Chicago deep dish!

Try it again, please!

Offline itsinthesauce

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #23 on: April 13, 2005, 11:01:41 AM »
Buzz, my recipe is the same as yours and no problems.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #24 on: April 13, 2005, 12:04:10 PM »
Buzz,

You are right. I was hoping before leaving for vacation that I would at least be able to come up with a tentative baker's percent table for your recipe. But where I have been encountering problems is in rationalizing the amounts of flour and water. When I weighed 6 T. of water, I got 3 oz. If 1 1/2 cups of flour weighs 8 oz., or even 7 oz., the hydration percent is around 38% when 8 oz. of flour is used and around 43% when 7 oz. of flour is used. Even factoring in the other liquid, the 6 t. of the canola/olive oil blend, at around 0.85-0.90 oz., the dough would still be very dry. So, unless that is normal for your dough, I suspect that additional water is added to the dough beyond the 6 T.

What would help is to get a better idea as to the condition and appearance of your dough just as it comes off the hook and also after your 2-min. kneading. Maybe you can elaborate a bit further on that, or even post some photos if that's possible. If someone else who has had great success with your recipe can post photos that would also be great. That way, we would have a better feel for when to stop adding water to the dough. The way I would proceed would be to use your recipe as posted and weigh the amounts of any additional water (or flour) that produces the condition of the dough that you strive to achieve.

Peter
« Last Edit: July 03, 2005, 11:44:04 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline buzz

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #25 on: April 13, 2005, 12:54:19 PM »
I don't use a mixer--I do it by hand. As I said, I start out with a bit less liquid than I think I'll need,  because the correct hydration of the flour is so dependent on external factors. I add the water/yeast mixture first, then add the oil a bit at a time. The result at this point should be a rough ball-shaped mound, a bit crumbly and scrappy at the edges. If I think I have enough liquid, then I start to knead--if not, then I add a little more water. So much depends on the external conditions!

When I start to knead, it pretty quickly comes together into a cohesive ball. In other words, there's enough liquid to hold it together, but not enough so it's a wet, sticky mass. It is a dry dough, but not overly so.

After the long rise, it can turn out a bit wetter (humidity, I suppose), so I just add a little bench flour when I roll it out.

Offline buzz

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #26 on: April 13, 2005, 01:00:14 PM »
I can only speak for my own experience, but I find that when it's humid, I need less liquid and when it's arid, I need more. I wish I could be more exact, but each individual pizza is different as to its moisture requirements!

I think you're just going to have to experiment--when it's done right, it's superb!

Offline buzz

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #27 on: April 13, 2005, 01:01:31 PM »
Itsinthesauce--

You do it exactly the same way?

Offline itsinthesauce

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #28 on: April 13, 2005, 01:04:50 PM »
Yep, South Sider from Chicago. Mostly I do thin crust, as everyone prefers that.

Offline buzz

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #29 on: April 13, 2005, 01:08:54 PM »
Go to www.giordanos.com and look at the photo of the deep dish there. That's what it looks like!


Offline buzz

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #30 on: April 13, 2005, 01:09:43 PM »
You're right--this same recipe makes an excellent thin crust, too!

Offline itsinthesauce

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #31 on: April 13, 2005, 01:11:59 PM »
Right, I don't change a thing.

Offline itsinthesauce

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #32 on: April 13, 2005, 01:14:00 PM »
Here's a pic

Offline DKM

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #33 on: April 13, 2005, 03:44:20 PM »
I enjoy the pizza-making process by feel rather than by strict weighing and measuring (which would take all the fun out of it for me)--but I get consistent results because I know what I'm looking for.

I man after my own sense of cooking/baking.

DKM
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Offline DKM

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #34 on: April 13, 2005, 03:51:22 PM »
BTW I tried this recipe and really like it.  I plan to try it again by weight based on the last time.  I'll write things down four those of you who weigh.

Plus I'll try to take pictures.

DKM
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Offline buzz

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #35 on: April 14, 2005, 09:27:41 AM »
DKM--

Did it come out biscuit/pie-like for you?

Offline buzz

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #36 on: April 14, 2005, 09:31:01 AM »
It'sinthesauce--

We must be doing something different because I don't get that kind of rise out of it. I find that with the minimal kneading time (2 minutes by hand), it never rises more than by half, even after 8 hours! At the end of that time, it has the appearance of a ball of dough with little chunks all over it!

Offline itsinthesauce

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #37 on: April 14, 2005, 09:36:44 AM »
I kneed it a little longer, then let it rise in a warm place for an hour, put it in the fridge for a while then take it out a let it get to room temp. Pretty much it.

Offline buzz

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #38 on: April 14, 2005, 09:46:06 AM »
Very seriously--do a shorter knead and let me know what you think!

Offline itsinthesauce

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #39 on: April 14, 2005, 09:58:08 AM »
Okay, I'll try it and see what happens.


 

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