Author Topic: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza  (Read 115469 times)

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Offline buzz

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Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« on: April 09, 2005, 12:10:45 PM »
After several years of research and help from Tom Lehman, here is my recipe for authentic Chicago-style deep dish pizza! Note—this recipe duplicates the pizza found at Giordano's, as opposed to Uno's/Malnati's, which I personally find greasy and unpleasant (to duplicate their recipe, you can use more oil or an oil/shortening combination). Also, I like to knead the dough by hand, so you machine mixers will have to figure a way around that!

The following is the recipe for a 10" deep dish pizza, based on one-and-a-half cups of flour—you can double it for a larger pie (BTW, this formula makes an excellent thin crust as well!).

One-and-a-half cups flour (I use Ceresota, which has a bit more gluten than regular AP—King Arthur is good, too)

1 TSP. yeast

Three-quarters TSP. Kosher salt

Three-quarters TSP. Sugar

6 TSP. Oil (5-5.5 Canola oil, the rest light olive oil)

6 TBS. warm water (this makes a total of one-half cup liquid, oil and water—depending on the humidity, age of the flour, altitude, etc., you might have to adjust the liquid if the dough is too dry and scrappy)

Proof the yeast. Mix the flour, salt and sugar. Add yeast mixture. Use your hands to start to form the dough into a rough ball, then add the oil a little a time until it comes together into cohesive ball (it will still be a bit scrappy). Add more water if necessary.

Knead only two minutes. This is the key to the biscuit/pie-like quality of Chicago deep dish pizza. The more you knead, the more bready the result will be. So a short knead is the real secret!

Let the dough rise—because of the short kneading time, it will not rise very much. I let it rise for several hours—as many as 8. The longer the better! Then you can put it in the fridge overnight if you'd like, and use it the next day.

Once it has risen, roll it out thin with a rolling pin. If it wants to bounce back, let it rest 10 minutes or so. Then fold the dough in quarters, let it rest a little and roll it out flat and thin again (it should be at least 12" in diameter). You can repeat a third time, if you'd like.

Once it's rolled flat and thin for the final time, immediately put it in the 10" deep dish pan (you can grease the pan, if you'd like, with oil or butter)—in other words, don't let it rise in the pan. The size of the dough should be larger than the pan, so drape it over, press it down, and cut off the edges.

Add cheese, toppings, sauce, etc.

I let my oven pre-heat at 500 for 15 minutes. I put the pizza in, turn it to 450, and let it cook about 30 minutes, sometimes 35. This makes the perfect deep dish pizza—it's awesome!





Offline Steve

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2005, 09:02:59 PM »
Buzz, I'm glad you finally decided to post your recipe!!  ;)

And it's a good one! Right up there with DKM's recipe!  ;D

You might want to to change the name of this thread to "Reverse engineering Giordano's pizza"  ;)
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Offline DKM

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2005, 05:39:48 PM »
Cool,

It is mixed and sitting in the fridge.

I can't wait to try it out.

DKM
I'm on too many of these boards

Offline buzz

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2005, 10:13:34 AM »
This weekend I mixed up a batch Saturday morning, then got sidetracked and wound up leaving it at room temp until the next morning--I put it in the fridge and cooked it Sunday night. While it was still good, the crust was a little tough. I've had the best luck with letting it rise at room temp for 6-8 hours or so.


Here's the sauce I made which came out really well!

I can very fresh 6-in-1 (I've noticed that older cans get a bit acidic)

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 TSP. sugar

Three-quarters TSP. Kosher salt

A few shakes of dried basil

Half a TSP. of dried "pizza seasoning" (including fennel)

DKM--Let me know how it comes out!

Offline buzz

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2005, 10:15:53 AM »
Oh,and for the sauce, a shake or two of red pepper flakes--it really puts it over the top!

Offline Steve

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2005, 11:51:24 AM »
I would love to see this recipe converted to baker's percentages (or by weight).  ;)
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Offline buzz

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2005, 12:11:55 PM »
Hey, Steve--you know me--it's not my thing! I'm sure you can work it out, though!

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #7 on: April 11, 2005, 01:36:55 PM »
Buzz,

Trying to come up with baker's percents from a recipe where the ingredients are given in volumes is not as easy as it may appear. That's because no two people measure things the same way or use the same measuring cups, spoons, etc.  And some have a heavier hand than others. If I were to try to convert your recipe to baker's percents, I would want to put myself into your shoes as much as possible and try as closely as possible to recreate exactly what you do in making your dough, especially if you have been using the same techniques on a consistent basis. That way I minimize guessing as much as possible and am more likely to replicate your results. Then, with the help of a good digital scale, I can weigh out the heavier ingredients, like flour and water, and use other techniques for the lighter ingredients, like yeast, sugar, salt and oil, to calculate the baker's percents. For example, here are the questions I would ask you if I were to go through the above exercise:

1) What do you use to measure the flour? A glass Pyrex measuring cup (if so, what size?) or one without a pouring lip and, if the latter, do you level off the top with a straight edge? How do you get the flour into the cup, i.e., do you just scoop the measuring cup into the bag of flour and lift it out or do you use something like a spoon to scoop the flour into the measuring cup? If the KA flour is to be used in lieu of the Ceresota, is it the KA all-purpose flour or the KA bread flour? 

2) How and what do you use to measure the water?

3) How and what do you use to measure the yeast, salt, sugar and oil (e.g., measuring spoons or ordinary kitchen spoons)? Do you use rounded teaspoons or flush? What brand of Kosher salt are you using?

4) I assume you are using active dry yeast (ADY). Do you use extra water to proof the yeast (if so, how much?) or do you use part of the water that combines with the oil to make about 1/2 cup?

5) You indicate that you are using a 10" pan, that the dough should be rolled out to at least 12", and that some dough is left over when it has been placed in the pan. How deep is the pan (e.g., 2", 2 1/4", etc.) and roughly how much dough is left over (e.g., 1", 2", etc.)? How thin is the dough when you have placed it into the pan?

If you can answer the above questions, then I might be able to come up with a first cut at establishing weights and the baker's percents. Then, someone may want to give the numbers a test run by making a dough using the baker's percents and weights rather than volumes. An iterative process may be necessary to fine tune the numbers, but at least it would be a start.

Peter

Offline buzz

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #8 on: April 12, 2005, 11:00:39 AM »
I enjoy the pizza-making process by feel rather than by strict weighing and measuring (which would take all the fun out of it for me)--but I get consistent results because I know what I'm looking for.

I use a flat stainless steel measuring scoop to measure the flour--I don't bother to level it off (for me it doesn't matter). Ceresota is a higher-gluten AP, as is King Arthur AP--I've used both and prefer Ceresota. I wouldn't personally use bread flour for any pizza.

As for water--sometimes I used a measuring scoop or a TBS. spoon--doesn't matter.

Yeast and oil are measured with flat measuring spoons--standard issue stainless steel.

I use all the water I start with to proof the yeast. I always start with the minimum I think I'll need because, depending on the temperature, humidity, etc. I know I'll have to add more liquid--I just don't know how much. For example, with the last deep dish I made, for 1.5 cups flour, I wound up having to add almost two extra TBS. water to the .5 cup oil/water base.

The amount of dough left over depends on how thin you roll it out. I roll it out to maybe an eighth inch, if that. The point is to roll it out as thin as you can, bigger in diameter than the circumference of your pan (mine actually measures 9.5"x2"), so that you overlap the entire circumference. Then press the dough in so that it entirely fills up the edges of the pan. Then trim off what's left.

I hope this helps. It would be best to make one by hand yourself, and then if you want to transcribe it into a formula, you can!

BTW, as for the cooking time--this is how my personal gas oven works. I recently made a deep dish at a friend's house with their electric oven, and it took much longer to cook, even in a pre-heated oven. So you'll just have to experiment a few times to get it right!

This makes an excellent biscuit-like, pie-like crust!

Offline Randy

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #9 on: April 12, 2005, 11:25:19 AM »
  Buzz's 1 1/2 cup of flour should be close to 8oz I figure.
Randy


Offline buzz

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #10 on: April 12, 2005, 12:48:33 PM »
8 oz. is one cup, so I would doubt that. I use a half-cup measuring cup, dip it in, give it a shake so it's more or less even, and go from there. I would suspect it's pretty close to 1.5 cups, if not even a little more.

Offline Randy

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #11 on: April 12, 2005, 12:55:24 PM »
I may not have been clear Buzz.  I meant 8oz by weight not the 8oz liquid measure that appears on a glass or plastic measuring cup shown at the one cup level.

Randy

Offline buzz

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #12 on: April 12, 2005, 01:29:59 PM »
Gotcha! You can tell I'm not a weigher! Lol!

Offline Randy

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #13 on: April 12, 2005, 02:25:43 PM »
Your description of how you measure makes me think 8oz by weight is correct, Then since you work your dough by hand which picks up a bit more flour then I would think 8.5 oz.
Take a look at this biscuit recipe and look at the fat, water and flour ratio which is very close to yours.

Southern biscuits
2 cups White Lily Self-Rising Soft Wheat Flour(4.250z per cup using the spoon and level method instead of the scoop)
1/4 cup vegetable shortening
2/3 to 3/4 cup milk.
Biscuits like your crust are kneaded very little.

Your recipe looks solid to me Buzz.

Randy

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #14 on: April 12, 2005, 05:25:12 PM »
To determine the variability of conversions of flour volume to weight, today I perfomed several weighings of three different flours. I did not have any Ceresota flour or KA all-purpose flour on hand to do the weighing tests, but I did have the following three flours: Gold Medal all-purpose flour, KA bread flour, and Giusto artisan bread flour. I knew that I wouldn't get the same results with the three flours since they have different levels of protein and may well be milled differently. The Gold Metal flour has a protein content of 10.5%, the KA bread flour has a protein content of 12.7%, and the Giusto artisan flour has a protein content of 11-11.5%. By contrast, the Ceresota flour is said to have a protein content of 11%. The KA all-purpose flour, which Buzz indicates is an acceptable alternative to the Ceresota flour, has a protein content of 11.7%.

I conducted four different weighing tests. In the first test, using the Gold Medal all-purpose flour, I casually dipped a 1/2-cup metal measuring cup into a bag of the flour three times in succession, scooped out an estimated 1/2 cup of flour each time, and then shook the measuring cup a bit to level the flour at roughly the top of the measuring cup. I then weighed the three "1/2-cups" of flour on a digital scale. For the second test, I repeated the first test but this time I used the flat edge of a knife to level off the top of the flour in the measuring cup. For the third and fourth tests, I repeated the first test (dip, scoop and shake three times) but I used the KA bread flour and the Giusto bread flour, respectively. The results I got from the various weighings were as follows, in ounces.

Gold Medal a-p, rough:    7.55  7.30  7.35  7.35  7.30  7.20  7.55 (Avg. = 7.37 oz.)
Gold Medal, a-p, leveled:  6.95  6.90  6.95  6.90  6.95  6.90  6.95 (Avg. = 6.93 oz.)
KA bread, rough:              8.30  8.05  7.85  7.85  8.10  8.00  7.90 (Avg. = 8.01 oz.)
Giusto bread, rough:        8.30  8.20  7.80  8.10  7.95  7.90  7.90 (Avg. = 8.02 oz.)

I believe the above results show several things. First, that volume measurements are inherently considerably more unreliable than weight measurements. Second, that the "rough" measuring technique is subject to greater variations--much more so than using the "leveling" technique. This is evidenced by comparing the results of the two Gold Medal tests. Third, using the "rough" technique will invariably produce greater weights than using the "leveling" technique (no big surprise here). Fourth, different flours have different weights. Hence, it is not possible to generalize and use a standard figure for all flours to convert from volumes to weights.

Unfortunately, there is no way to predict the weights of flour as actually used by Buzz. But if I had to pick for purposes of determining the baker's percents for his recipe, I would tend to go with the results of the KA and Giusto flours with their average of around 8.00 ounces, since the Ceresota flour is more likely closer to those flours than the Gold Medal flour. The 8-ounce figure is also a nice even number. So, until someone comes forward with a better weight figure, I'm with Randy on the 8-oz. number.

Peter



Offline itsinthesauce

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #15 on: April 12, 2005, 07:04:52 PM »
Peter, you are so thorough. What in God's name do you do for a living? Maybe we should all guess...winner gets a free scale/ LOL

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #16 on: April 12, 2005, 10:17:41 PM »
itsinthesauce,

I am an amateur home pizza maker with a calculator, digital scale, cups, spoons, a KitchenAid mixer, a Cuisinart food processor, a bread machine, pizza stone, a wooden peel, a metal peel, pizza screens, the patience of Job, and a lot of time on my hands :).

Peter

Offline Randy

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #17 on: April 13, 2005, 07:23:11 AM »
Buzz, my deep dish recipe also calls for a 5 hour rise on the counter but I specified a longer knead time.  I think you are right about the knead time and I hope to try it your way in the next day or so.

 I have been using bread flour but with the lower knead time I think KA AP flour would be in order. 
What do you think?

Randy

Offline buzz

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #18 on: April 13, 2005, 09:05:16 AM »
Randy--

I'd say that traditional biscuits have almost twice the fat as deep dish pizza. The old formula of .25 cup oil per 3 cups flour is right (I just use half that for my smaller pizza). I've tried a bit more oil and the result is too "oily", for my taste, anyway!

I would try an even longer rise time--try 7-8 hours. And no more than 2 minutes kneading by hand (I don't like using a mixer, so you'll have to experiment, if you use one).

For this style of pizza, I wouldn't use bread flour.

Peter--

Good homework on your part! I don't bother with such precision because I can tell by eye and feel what I need, after having made so many pizzas! But I think you're going to have to experiment if you want to work out the best baker's formula!

Ceresota or KA AP is fine--bread flour just has too much gluten.

Fun, isn't it?

Offline Randy

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Re: Recipe fopr Authentic Chicago Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #19 on: April 13, 2005, 09:26:56 AM »
I read your recipe wrong.  I read the oil as tablespoons instead of teaspoons, my bad.  here is my ingredient recipe.  I like the small amount of cornmeal after having tried it without.  I think my test will be no cornmeal but use milk in place of the water and cut the olive oil out.
Makes 2  10-inch Chicago deep dish.
1 teaspoon bread machine yeast
1 teaspoon raw sugar
8 oz  water + 1 Tablespoon if needed (70deg)
3 tablespoons Crisco zero trans fat
1 tablespoons Clasico Olive Oil
16 oz KA Bread flour
2 tablespoons yellow corn meal(Optional)
1 ½  Teaspoon salt


 

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