Author Topic: help please  (Read 1104 times)

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Offline PIZZA 505

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Re: help please
« Reply #25 on: July 19, 2016, 11:42:39 PM »
The oven has something to do with it, I am using a conventional gas oven. I clocked it at 500 degrees(using a thermometer) after preheating for 45 minutes using only a seasoned pizza screen. The problem is that as soon as i open the oven to put in the pizza I lose about 40-60 degrees. I cook the pizza for 8-10 minutes tops. The bottom actually looks good i will take a picture of tomorrows pie. Thanks so much I feel like I have improved a ton with your help and I am excited to try out my new pizza oven this week,hopefully it helps.

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: help please
« Reply #26 on: July 20, 2016, 01:17:11 AM »
P505;
If you are baking the pizza just on a screen that might be the problem right there. Home ovens have two main problems when it comes to baking pizza, 1) They don't really have any bottom heat so vertical positioning of the pizza in the oven rack is critical. 2) Heat recovery is poor, to say the least. If you bake your pizzas on a pizza stone the stone holds latent heat which is released into the bottom of the pizza when you place the pizza on it and the mass of the stone (latent heat) helps to overcome the heat loss when you open the oven door. Baking your pizza directly on the stone should give a significant improvement in crust color development,
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Online Pete-zza

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Re: help please
« Reply #27 on: July 20, 2016, 08:45:11 AM »
Bo,

With respect to the cooling issue, you might take a look at this post by Tom that discusses cooler temperatures in general, at Reply 1 at:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=43168.msg432148;topicseen#msg432148

I am also in agreement with Tom on the oven issue as it relates to browning.

Peter

Offline PIZZA 505

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Re: help please
« Reply #28 on: July 21, 2016, 12:12:21 AM »
Hey guys so I baked a 16"pie 3 day fermentation in my reach in freezer at 40 degrees. Its not saying much but I have to say its the best tasting pizza i have ever made the crust was crispy but chewy ,dough flavor was great . I started making inedible pizza just 2 -3 weeks ago now I feel I can at least make good homemade pizza. I need to get to the next level, my oven gets hooked up in 2 days and I can start working on getting to where i want to be. Thanks everyone who helped me when I thought It was hopeless. I am attaching a few pics of today's pie so that any one who wishes to comment on anything that will help me make better pizza thanks again everyone!

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: help please
« Reply #29 on: July 21, 2016, 01:24:53 AM »
P505;
Allll Right!! Now you're getting some bottom crust color. The crumb porosity looks good too. Your next series of experiments should center around using a pizza stone. Due to the more efficient heat transfer when baking directly on the stone the crumb porosity might also improve by getting a larger cell structure due to the improved oven spring when baking on a stone, you might even find another pizza that you like as much as the one you are making right now.
I'm glad to hear that you really like the pizza you're making now, we're all here to help.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline PIZZA 505

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Re: help please
« Reply #30 on: Yesterday at 12:30:05 AM »
Hi guys I could use some help/advice. Today I whipped up a batch today on my 20 quart stand mixer and I followed Tom's advice on my recipe. The method of mixing and better refrigeration he suggested has made all the difference I am now pizza crazy making pizza 2x a day just to get practice and my end results are a lot better. The problem i encountered today was that after mixing for 2 minutes low speed , add oil, 1 minute low speed followed by 8 minutes at speed 2. This method has been great the last couple of weeks, but today my dough came out very warm, sticky and hard to shape and weigh. I managed to make it work somewhat, but I would rather not have this happen again. The only variable that changed today was that this batch was DOUBLE what I usually make. Could that have affected my end result?

 Flour (100%):
Water (62%):
IDY (.4%):
Salt (1.5%):
Oil (1.5%):
Sugar (3%):
Total (168.4%):
Single Ball:
2693.59 g  |  95.01 oz | 5.94 lbs
1670.02 g  |  58.91 oz | 3.68 lbs
10.77 g | 0.38 oz | 0.02 lbs | 3.58 tsp | 1.19 tbsp
40.4 g | 1.43 oz | 0.09 lbs | 8.42 tsp | 2.81 tbsp
40.4 g | 1.43 oz | 0.09 lbs | 8.98 tsp | 2.99 tbsp
80.81 g | 2.85 oz | 0.18 lbs | 6.76 tbsp | 0.42 cups
4536 g | 160 oz | 10 lbs | TF = N/A
453.6 g | 16 oz | 1 lbs

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: help please
« Reply #31 on: Yesterday at 01:25:02 AM »
P505;
By doubling the dough size you will get a couple more degrees temperature gain due to the friction of the dough rubbing against the bowl but not enough to give you the result that you have observes, hence the only other reason why your dough has become noticeably warmer by just doubling the batch size is because the water temperature had to be significantly warmer. Remember, if you want to make great pizza, and if you want to do it consistently you've got to take the temperature of the water that you are putting into the mixing bowl (about 70F) and also the temperature of the dough at the end of the mixing period. You will most likely be served best with a finished dough temperature of around 75 to 80F but this might vary to some extent depending upon your exact dough management parameters. Remember that as the finished dough temperature gets into the 90F range the wheat proteins (gluten) begin to disassociate (come apart) resulting in a stringy, sticky dough that is all but impossible to work with.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Online Pete-zza

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Re: help please
« Reply #32 on: Yesterday at 09:58:53 AM »
Bo,

To follow your dough formulation better, I entered your percents into the expanded dough calculating tool and see that you used Morton's Kosher salt as the salt and olive oil as the oil. This is what I got:

Flour (100%):
Water (62%):
IDY (0.40%):
Morton's Kosher Salt (1.5%):
Olive Oil (1.5%):
Sugar (3%):
Total (168.4%):
Single Ball:
2693.59 g  |  95.01 oz | 5.94 lbs
1670.02 g  |  58.91 oz | 3.68 lbs
10.77 g | 0.38 oz | 0.02 lbs | 3.58 tsp | 1.19 tbsp
40.4 g | 1.43 oz | 0.09 lbs | 8.42 tsp | 2.81 tbsp
40.4 g | 1.43 oz | 0.09 lbs | 8.98 tsp | 2.99 tbsp
80.81 g | 2.85 oz | 0.18 lbs | 6.76 tbsp | 0.42 cups
4536 g | 160 oz | 10 lbs | TF = N/A
453.6 g | 16 oz | 1 lbs

In the future, you should use the Copy button in the expanded dough calculating tool to enter the formulation into your posts (I use Ctrl-C to enter the formulation into the post). Otherwise, the two parts of the formulation will be one on top of the other. You cannot copy and paste from the tool itself.

Peter


 

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