Author Topic: 6/2/05 Cooking Class w/ Peter Reinhart (author of American Pie: My Search....)  (Read 6491 times)

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Offline davtrent

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American Pie: My Search for the Perfect Pizza author Peter Reinhart will share his pizza journey and will demonstrate doughs, sauces and toppings at the culinary teaching center at A Southern Season in Chapel Hill, NC on June 2, 2005 at 6:00 p.m.

Registration/ information is available online at   www.southernseason.com
or by calling toll free (877) 929-7133.

Cost of this class is $50.00

I've regestered and am looking forward to watching Mr. Reinhart make pizza!

Regards,

davtrent

(P.S.  Steve-- I was unable to post this to the June calendar)
« Last Edit: June 03, 2005, 09:11:52 AM by Steve »


Offline Steve

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It's linked now. Thanks!
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Offline wayno

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Dave,

I'm in. 

See ya there?

Wayno
At night, I either sleep, make love or dream about making pizza.

Offline WOMBAT

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Is there any classes on the west coast?

Offline Steve

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How was the class?  :)
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Offline wayno

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The class was held in one of those deluxe rooms similar to the set up on Emeril Live. The only thing missing was the pep band. We were seated 3 to a table. 4 tables in a row. 3 rows deep. I think that makes 36 "students." 2nd and 3rd rows were elevated so you could see over the folks in front of you.  Fancy white table cloth with wine glasses. YES, they did serve two shots of a pretty good red wine - 2002 Nicodemi Montepulciano d'Abruzzo. Seeing the set up alone was worth $50!  The fact that it was sold out attests to the popularity of PIZZA!

They had a overhead camera set up (with remote control) to track Peter as he prepared the many pies.  They also had another camera shooting from the back of the room to catch Peter as he talked about Pizza and the stages of the bread baking process. I asked them if they videotaped the 2 1/2 hour class. Much to my surprise, they did not.  I figured they could get some more recvenue there.

He brought several dough balls (prepared the day before) to the class.  He did an excellent job of demonstrating basic dough stretching technique, but what I really like was his exuberance and passion for PIZZA.  He mentioned several time that he thought Chris Bianco is the best in America because Chris really cares about his PIZZA.

Peter very patiently took the time to talk with each of us after the class and he autographed copies of his book: AMERICAN PIE.

I will ask Dave Trent to add more as he sees fit.

Wayno
At night, I either sleep, make love or dream about making pizza.

Offline Steve

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Yes, but did you plug the website?  ;)
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Offline Steve

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I wish that I could have attended the class. It must have been surreal sitting there watching Peter make pizza.

Steve
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Offline giambra

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I attended the class with Reinhart Thursday evening.   I thought it was great.   Some random notes:

- His passion, technical knowledge, and enthusiasism were all very evident and contagious, I felt very inspired on the drive home and afterwards.
- For me, it was helpful to see the doughmaking techniques and other aspects of pizza making in person, as opposed to just reading about them.  I mentioned
this to him when he signed my book and he agreed its difficult to clearly write what your supposed to do in a kitchen, much better to see it.
- I knew that a long slow cold fermentation did a lot for a pizza dough, but he had a simple explanation that made me understand WHY we do that.
I'll butcher his words some (please someone correct me), but I think he basically said that once a dough is made, its a race between the yeast and the
enzymes to see who gets to the starch / sugar.  The enzymes react with the flour/glucose/starch and bring flavor out, and the yeast eat the starch/glucose.
We refrigerate the dough because it slows down the yeast and gives the enzymes a chance to extact the flavor before the yeast gets to it (converting it
carbon dioxide and something else).  This also helped me understand why we want to use as little yeast as possible and use more time.
- Thought his reference from the living to dead to living to dead was interesting.  This was referring to the Wheat (alive) thats turned into flour (dead)
thats turned into dough (alive) that is killed (by baking it).  I was distracted at this point and I missed the exact point of this thought.
- He has started writing a new book, about whole grain breads, due out in a year and a half or so.
- Sounds like he may prefer to make dough by hand versus a kitchen aid.  He commented that sometimes the dough rides up the hook and doesn't mix as well,
which I seem to see a lot.
- He passed around the focaccio dough, I was surprised to see how wet it was.
- I think my favorite items we sampled was the white clam pizza and the focaccio with thin sliced tomatoes and pesto (added after removing from the oven)
- One question I had, it looked like he used extra virign olive oil for everything (doughs and marinades).  Thought I'd read that most of the time should
use regular olive oil in pizza making, because extra virgin can be too strong
- Peter did all the recipe development for Amy's fozen pizzas (which explains why they are so good).  I liked his story about the production manager having his
picture up with a target on it, because of all the work required for the caramelized sweet and sour onion marmalade
- All in all, he is personable, knowledgable and a good teacher, I'd love to be able to take a class with him at Johnson Wales Univ

Tim G.
Morrisville, NC

Online Pete-zza

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Tim,

The processes that take place within a dough involving yeast are very complex. The most important thing to know about yeast is that it feeds on sugar and the byproducts of the consumption of sugar are carbon dioxide and alcohol (ethyl alcohol). The carbon dioxide is a gas and is what makes the dough rise. The alcohol stays in the dough and burns off during baking.

Yeast is fond of simple sugars such as fructose and glucose. There is a small amount of these sugars in the flour to begin with (about 0.5%) and the yeast starts to feed off of these as soon as the dough is formed. There is also a source of complex sugars, also in small quantity (around 1-2%), that are ultimately converted by enzymes to glucose to feed the yeast also. Because the amounts of sugar from these two sources is so small, the amount of carbon dioxide is small also so you won't see the dough visibly rise for quite a while. The bulk of the sugar to feed the yeast--which really gets the carbon dioxide production cranked up and causes the dough to visibly rise--comes from the conversion of damaged starch molecules (they are damaged during milling of the flour) to complex sugars by the action of other enzymes in the flour (mainly alpha- and beta-amylase). It takes a series of conversions to convert the complex sugars to glucose to continue to feed the yeast. Now you can see why Peter Reinhart mentioned glucose a lot. Ultimately, almost all the sugars in the flour are converted to glucose. The more yeast there is in the flour to begin with and the faster it eats, the more the enzymes have to work to keep the yeast satisfied. Hence, the "race" analogy.

The flavor components come more through the action of bacteria (such as lactobacillus) in the flour to produce a large number of compounds and organic acids--mainly acetic acid (vinegar) and lactic acid. The bacteria can function even during a period of refrigeration, even though the yeast action is retarded during the period of refrigeration. There are some interactions between the yeast and the bacteria, but they pretty much stay out of each other's way. That's one of the reasons why their relationship is often described as "symbiotic".

Peter
« Last Edit: June 04, 2005, 12:24:59 AM by Pete-zza »


Offline Randy

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The ladies on the baking circle lineup when he puts on a class near them.  PR has made a few post but mostly when a new book comes out like American Pie.  I have his Bread Bakers Apprentice and have throughly enjoyed the cookbook and think it is much better than American Pie which I also have.  Not that American Pie is bad but I think it is more suited for someone just getting serious about pizza.  For someone that is going to hand knead their pizza dough I don't think their is a better pizza book.  I think a lot of us were looking for answers to Chicago and cracker thin crust but he barely touched those pizzas.

If a class were near me on bread or pizza I would surely go.

Randy