Author Topic: Cost in Neapolitan Pizza  (Read 11141 times)

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Offline PizzaVera

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Re: Cost in Neapolitan Pizza
« Reply #50 on: October 27, 2010, 05:43:50 AM »
All I can tell you is that I wouldn't be buying from your guy. You don't have any real measure at all. What will fit in a 1 ton truck is vague at best and certainly does not correspond to 1 ton of volume or any other standardized measurement.



what will fit into a 1 ton truck? 40 of those bundles in the picture apparently , but yes its vague, I need measurements of the 1 ton trucks cargo area to really know.. I will get on that tomorrow...

but judging by the picture above, do you think 40 of those bundles is an OK price for 150 bucks?



Offline Matthew

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Re: Cost in Neapolitan Pizza
« Reply #51 on: October 27, 2010, 05:46:59 AM »
what will fit into a 1 ton truck? 40 of those bundles in the picture apparently , but yes its vague, I need measurements of the 1 ton trucks cargo area to really know.. I will get on that tomorrow...

but judging by the picture above, do you think 40 of those bundles is an OK price for 150 bucks?



Why not get it delivered?

Matt

Offline PizzaVera

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Re: Cost in Neapolitan Pizza
« Reply #52 on: October 27, 2010, 09:23:02 AM »
Why not get it delivered?

Matt

I dont need it yet, i'm Just doing a price estimate for an oven for my business plan

Offline GotRocks

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Re: Cost in Neapolitan Pizza
« Reply #53 on: October 27, 2010, 05:28:37 PM »
The only legal measure for wood is by the cord or fractions of a full cord. A typical way of stacking a cord of wood is a stack 8 feet wide, 4 feet tall, and 4 feet deep. (128 Cubic Feet)
If the wood is cut to 16" lengths, it takes 3 rows deep to make a full cord, if it is 12" lengths it takes 4 rows deep to make a full cord. This is why it is so important to avoid terminology like "Ricks, racks, face-cords, stove cords, loads, bundles", or to buy using weight" stick with cords and fractions of cords only to keep everything on the up and up

I standard box on a 1/2-ton pick-up truck will hold just shy of 1/4th of a full cord if stacked neatly up to the bed rails, with 2 extra armloads to make up for the space taken up by the wheel wells.

A full cord of seasoned ready to burn hardwoods will weigh in excess of 4,000 pounds in many case, freshly cut wood will easily exceed 6,000-8,000 pounds depending on species.
Oak is notorious for taking several years to dry to a suitable moisture level for cooking use (18%-22% moisture content) so if the wood was cut any less than 36 months ago, it probably is not ready to burn for cooking.
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Offline pacoast

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Re: Cost in Neapolitan Pizza
« Reply #54 on: October 27, 2010, 07:13:55 PM »
what will fit into a 1 ton truck? 40 of those bundles in the picture apparently , but yes its vague, I need measurements of the 1 ton trucks cargo area to really know.. I will get on that tomorrow...

but judging by the picture above, do you think 40 of those bundles is an OK price for 150 bucks?
A 1 ton truck will ostensibly carry 1 ton of weight. But this varies between truck models. Post #34 shows a "1 ton" pickup that is rated for a 5,100# payload and has a full cord of wood (about 4,000#) in it. In any event, the standard measure of firewood is volume, not weight. I can't comment on the price, this varies too much from place to place and I don't recall you saying where you were located. Ask around locally & compare vendor pricing for your business plan. If better prices cannot be found, then that is a good price for your location.

When actually taking delivery ensure that the wood is seasoned (dry) or that you are dealing with a reputable vendor that remedy unexpected problems. I do like your approach of overestimating your wood consumption. Personally, I would be comfortable with the 15 kg/33# per hour estimate. Business plans that underestimate costs cause a lot of grief. Financing based on a conservative plan is much more likely to succeed.

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Cost in Neapolitan Pizza
« Reply #55 on: October 27, 2010, 08:22:59 PM »
The "one ton" is not a rating of what it can cary.

Offline pacoast

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Re: Cost in Neapolitan Pizza
« Reply #56 on: October 27, 2010, 09:13:51 PM »
The "one ton" is not a rating of what it can cary.
Yes it is, at least in it's original usage. These labels are historical monikers that date back more than 50 years. The description originally meant exactly what it says. Today, it's just a convenient label to describe a truck that is about the same physical size or type of vehicle.

With better axles, suspensions, etc and a wider variety of optional equipment, the label isn't necessarily literal anymore and a modern "1 ton" truck might have an actual payload capacity anywhere from 1 - 3 tons.

Offline ringkingpin

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Re: Cost in Neapolitan Pizza
« Reply #57 on: October 28, 2010, 12:23:23 PM »
I do not think it is proper accounting to use fuel cost for a food-cost calcualtion, I feel that fuel wood would be better put in the "operations Cost" category.

Interesting thread. Got rocks i was going to say the same thing, the oven fuel is a fixed cost don't include it in the cost of the pizza otherwise you'd have to include all other fixed costs like electricity for the open sign, hand soap etc. 
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Offline GotRocks

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Re: Cost in Neapolitan Pizza
« Reply #58 on: November 01, 2010, 11:56:33 PM »
Interesting thread. Got rocks i was going to say the same thing, the oven fuel is a fixed cost don't include it in the cost of the pizza otherwise you'd have to include all other fixed costs like electricity for the open sign, hand soap etc. 

Exactly,
Fuel cost's should not just be ignored, but it should not be figured into a "Food-Cost" calculation.
A skinny cook is not to be trusted!


Offline gabaghool

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Re: Cost in Neapolitan Pizza
« Reply #59 on: September 20, 2011, 09:13:15 PM »
in a 15 $ margherita pizza you'll have usually
about 1$ of dough, 2 $ of tomatoes, about 3 to 5 $ of mozzarella, and 0,20 $ of basil, that makes about 8 $, then count all the equipement in the kitchen, the employees salary, that doesnt make a lot of profit  :P

$1 a dough????  How is this possible??

Offline Matthew

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Re: Cost in Neapolitan Pizza
« Reply #60 on: September 21, 2011, 05:39:26 AM »
$1 a dough????  How is this possible??

It's not, those numbers aren't even close.  $2 in tomatoes would be accurate if you're using 1/2 can per pizza.

Matt

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Cost in Neapolitan Pizza
« Reply #61 on: September 21, 2011, 06:46:46 AM »
For a recent discussion on dough ball pricing, see the PMQ Think Tank thread at http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=10587&hilit=Dough+cents+ounce. That discussion is with respect to non-Neapolitan dough, whose cost I would expect to be higher if a 00 flour is used.

Peter

Offline thezaman

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Re: Cost in Neapolitan Pizza
« Reply #62 on: October 05, 2011, 08:06:56 AM »
My grande curd came in at 265 per pound the most i use is 4 oz per pizza and that coverthe pizza well.i think 2.50 cost per pizza is closer to actual cost.