Author Topic: Tartine Bakery's "Tartine Bread" cookbook  (Read 8617 times)

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Offline Essen1

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Tartine Bakery's "Tartine Bread" cookbook
« on: October 01, 2010, 10:56:27 PM »
I just got this in tonight:

"Tartine Bread" by Chad Robertson, owner of the Tartine Bakery in the Mission, San Francisco.

My first impression was that it is a very "luxurious" book since the hardcover is slightly padded and gives the book a great feel and nice little personal touch.

I haven't had the chance to read all the way through but I'm already impressed. It covers almost everything, from making starters, Country breads, Pizza, Baguettes, Brioches, Croissants, Tordu, Fendu, Sandwiches, Soups and even Jams.

It goes into almost every detail, with pictures, explaining how to handle doughs, how to knead, how to shape loaves correctly, proofing, etc.

And it even mentions the Frankenweber. Apparently the guy is the authors neighbor.

I think this book is a great addition for everyone who's into baking, breads and pizza especially. It has also beautiful pictures and is written with clarity.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/0811870413/?tag=pizzamaking-20
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/


Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: Tartine Bakery's "Tartine Bread" cookbook
« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2010, 11:28:55 PM »
Nice review, I'm always interested in bread baking books and this one looks and sounds good. I think you learn more about dough and how to improve your pizza making from a book like this as opposed to a "pizza" book.

Offline Essen1

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Re: Tartine Bakery's "Tartine Bread" cookbook
« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2010, 11:51:39 PM »
DMC,

I just started to read the first few pages and there's a sense of an entire philosophy behind this book. So far, it's one of the best cookbooks I have in my collection regarding baking. It's right up there with Nancy Silverton's book "The breads of La Brea" if not better.

Here's a video from Tartine:

http://www.tartinebread.com/video.html
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: Tartine Bakery's "Tartine Bread" cookbook
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2010, 12:55:05 AM »
Essen 1, thanks for the video, great ! If it wasn't so late I think I'd start a loaf of bread right now. Enjoy your read and give us an up date.

Offline Essen1

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Re: Tartine Bakery's "Tartine Bread" cookbook
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2010, 01:00:28 AM »
DMC,

The book's talking about great results in a home oven with a combo cooker. It's the one you see in the video, the one the Asian woman is using.

I just ordered that from Amazon, and since I have Amazon Prime, shipping's free.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0009JKG9M/?tag=pizzamaking-20

Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Tartine Bakery's "Tartine Bread" cookbook
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2010, 08:00:59 AM »
My copy arrives this morning. Can't wait to try it. I'll be posting my results here:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12008.0.html


Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Tartine Bakery's "Tartine Bread" cookbook
« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2010, 08:26:55 AM »
Thanks for the review Mike.  Looking forward to your review as well Bill.  If indeed it is a must have then I'll get it. 

Offline Essen1

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Re: Tartine Bakery's "Tartine Bread" cookbook
« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2010, 12:11:22 PM »
My copy arrives this morning. Can't wait to try it. I'll be posting my results here:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12008.0.html




Bill,

You gonna love this book.


Jackie,

I'll post more detailed info once I read a little more through.
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Tartine Bakery's "Tartine Bread" cookbook
« Reply #8 on: October 02, 2010, 09:30:31 PM »
I am already loving this book. If you agree that "making good bread is all about managing fermentation", then this book is for you. Can't wait to try some of his recipes.


Offline Essen1

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Re: Tartine Bakery's "Tartine Bread" cookbook
« Reply #9 on: October 02, 2010, 09:41:17 PM »
There's another good, albeit somewhat funny, quote regarding the recent pizza hype on Page 95:

"Our current pizza revival, with all the attitude manifestos, and "secrets" (the flour! the water! the oven), is amusing."

I'm working on the basic country bread recipe right now, mainly on its starter, the 50/50 blend of flours. But the author also makes an interesting point regarding water in starters, mainly not to worry about that too much. He said what you're aiming for is a thick batter and if the water is good enough to drink, it's certainly good enough for a starter/dough.

Sounds like the guy's not too fussy about that.
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/


Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Tartine Bakery's "Tartine Bread" cookbook
« Reply #10 on: October 02, 2010, 10:09:31 PM »
I'm just going to use one of the starters in my stable, probably the French one since it is the sweetest. I will stick with his ratios, times, temps, and handling. For the first loaves, I'll probably bake on a stone with a dome and the steam generator. Then I'll advance to baking in the WFO. Should be fun!

Offline Essen1

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Re: Tartine Bakery's "Tartine Bread" cookbook
« Reply #11 on: October 02, 2010, 10:24:23 PM »
Bill,

I took 1/3 of a cup from Ed Wood's sourdough dough starter and fed it the 50/50 flour mix and it's already going strong.

I also ordered the combo cooker from Amazon yesterday because of the lack of a WFO. I feel encouraged because the way Chad R explained the steaming issues in a home oven and his solution.

Yes, I agree with you, the book is already a ton of fun. Not to mention all the great recipes in the later section of the book, such as Le Tourin, the onions soup, Sopa de Ajo, the Jambon Buerre Tartine, etc.

It all looks great. Holy cow, that book will keep me occupied for a few weeks  ;D
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline PUPATELLA

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Re: Tartine Bakery's "Tartine Bread" cookbook
« Reply #12 on: October 13, 2010, 09:49:47 PM »
Sometimes I wake up at night thinking about Gougeres and Brioch bread pudding we had at Tartine...

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Tartine Bakery's "Tartine Bread" cookbook
« Reply #13 on: October 21, 2010, 03:32:48 PM »
I decided to try some of this magic koolaid as well and ordered the book today. :chef:

Offline Guts

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Re: Tartine Bakery's "Tartine Bread" cookbook
« Reply #14 on: October 25, 2010, 11:56:48 AM »
Guts/AKA/Kim
"Vegetarian - old Indian word for bad fisherman"

Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: Tartine Bakery's "Tartine Bread" cookbook
« Reply #15 on: October 26, 2010, 07:49:49 PM »
My copy came in today, I wish all hard cover books came like the Tartine book instead of the removable paper sleeve. Can't wait to try out the breads and the Onion soup.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2010, 10:32:04 PM by BrickStoneOven »

Offline Essen1

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Re: Tartine Bakery's "Tartine Bread" cookbook
« Reply #16 on: October 26, 2010, 08:05:35 PM »
My copy come in today, I wish all hard cover books came like the Tartine book instead of the removable paper sleeve. Can't wait to try out the breads and the Onion soup.

They're both dynamite!
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Tartine Bakery's "Tartine Bread" cookbook
« Reply #17 on: October 28, 2010, 05:16:16 AM »
Just received my copy yesterday evening.   Thumbing through the book, I'm quite please with the cover, the beautiful pictures, and how well written it is.

All the positive reviews of the book both here and on amazon are spot on.   Upon delving further into the book, I am blown away.   Chad writes in such a way that it is both easy to read and understand the important points he wants you to learn.  With all the details and insights, you get a sense that he really wants the reader to succeed and make the same bread he sells in his bakery. 

I really love and agree with Chad's philosphy of using our senses to judge when a leaven is ready, when a dough has sufficiently bulk risen or proofed.   He encourages the reader to adjust water temperatures to manipulate fermentation rates.   

He explains why he discards 80% of the starter if it's been sitting in the fridge too long. 

I've only read through bits and pieces of the book enough to make my first loaf, but already I am estatic to have this book.  The foundational knowledge Chad imparts to the reader is invaluable and worth much much more than the price of the book. 

I'm typing this at 3am while my first Tartine loaf is baking away.  :-D

There are many really nice pictures in the book.  These are a few of my favorites.




« Last Edit: October 29, 2010, 12:07:47 AM by Jackie Tran »

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Tartine Bakery's "Tartine Bread" cookbook
« Reply #18 on: November 02, 2010, 03:02:04 PM »
Having made pizza for the last year or so, I have just begun my journey into homemade breads.   I have now only made a few awesome loaves of bread from this book.   If one has some experience with dough be it pizza or bread, the techniques offered in this book are very simple to pick up.  The book is well written with lots of pictures for the home baker to compare to. 

I have been so busy doing rather than reading, that I finally decided to start reading this book.   I've only made it 30 pages or so into the book and once again find myself impress with the author.  He shares his personal story and his lifelong quest for his perfect loaf.   I can really connect with his philosophy and methods.

He shares in this book some really key truths about bread that really stands out as significant & important to me.  For example on page 8, he tells of how his first mentor would like to say "dough is dough" implying all breads are closely related - even the ones that seemed different.   

To the casual reader, this statement may not have any significance.  To the baker that envisions a perfect loaf and approaches bread making "as both a craft and a philosophy of ingredients and how they interact" it has much significance. 

On page 20, Chad speaks of another mentor Richard Bourdon who taught him about proper hydration of the dough through the example of cooking rice.  "Try to cook a cup of rice in a half cup of water". 
Growing up in an asian family, I understandbly ate a ton or rice.   :-D  Depending on the year the rice was harvested, each crop requires a different amount of water to cook it in.  Underhdyrate rice and its tough and uncooked.  Overhydrate it and its mushy.  Adding just the right amount of water makes the grain come alive giving it proper moisture and texture.   Same with bread and pizza dough.   

Chad says of Bourdon's bread being "exceptionally moist and tender.. (having)...a depth of flavor achieved only after a long, slow rise using natural leaven.   

Anyways, just a few tidbits from the book I thought important enough to share.   This book is full of pearls of wisdom that will likely improve any readers skill and understanding of the process of bread making.  I would also say it has improved my understanding and management of my pizza dough as well.   

Chau
« Last Edit: November 02, 2010, 09:16:41 PM by Jackie Tran »

Offline Essen1

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Re: Tartine Bakery's "Tartine Bread" cookbook
« Reply #19 on: November 02, 2010, 08:47:52 PM »
Chau,

Very nice review.

The book still, after spending numerous hours on it and in it, blows me away by a) it's simple but clear approach, b) by the entire philosophy behind it, c) the clarity it is written with and d) it's simple but excellent recipes.

A must-have for anyone who wants to take their doughs a step further, regardless if it's pizza dough or bread dough. It might be the best bread book on the market to date.

Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/


 

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