Author Topic: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book  (Read 33016 times)

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Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #100 on: April 16, 2011, 10:46:09 AM »
Paul, talk about being lazy, I think I have you beat.

The method for the above pies is such...

-dissolve salt in water, then starter, and squeeze flour in.  (10m? to weigh out ingredients and combine)
-AL for 1 hour.
-In a bowl, grab an edge and fold into center.  Repeat 16 x.  Pull dough out and ball it up. (2-3m?)
-Back into fridge for 9 hours.  Pull dough out and reball. Divide and ball. (5m?)
-CF for another 9 hours.
-proof 2 hours at room temps, stretch and bake. 

It was the least amount of work for Tartine dough I have done.  I'm working on a really similar workflow for those who love Tartine bread but don't have the time or inclination to do all the stretch and folds.

Now who doesn't have less than half an hour to make tartine bread?

Chau



parallei

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #101 on: April 16, 2011, 11:16:29 PM »
Chau,

Think you could beat me at lazy, huh?  I'm not so sure! Your talking to a fellow that just retired and is still in the "I'm not done doing nothing yet" stage. Just ask my wife ;D

It might be a good Monthly Challenge topic.  Laziest Pie.  Time wouldn't matter, but you'd get points for least work, least number of bowls and things washed, least hassle with oven...you get the idea.   Nothing frozen though....

Paul 
« Last Edit: April 16, 2011, 11:20:53 PM by parallei »

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #102 on: April 24, 2011, 06:30:22 PM »
This is a Tartine pizza at 70% hydration using Caputo 00. The toppings, spring onions, bufala and fresh jalapeņos, are specifically for Tscarborough (see, I tried some non-goomba stuff!).

This was melt in your mouth and crispy at the same time. Now this is the way to spend an Easter evening.

John

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #103 on: April 24, 2011, 09:13:50 PM »
Beautiful John.  At this hydration, does it cook just as quickly as your regular 60% hydration pies?  I'm a bit surprise you can still get a crispy rim at that hydration.   Can't wait to start baking in mine.

Chau

Offline andreguidon

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #104 on: April 24, 2011, 09:59:25 PM »
wow John, 70% !!!!  how did you manage the dough ?? did you use the same temps ?? the pizzas looks GREAT !!
"Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication." Leonardo da Vinci

Offline wucactus1

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #105 on: April 24, 2011, 10:44:04 PM »
Though my recent pizza wasnt a tartine country dough it was anywhere from 67-70(67 before starter was added) and was almost impossible to manage during the kneading and ball forming stages both pre and post bulk rise, but when it was time to shape the skin I just flopped it out pushed it down and minimally handled it trying to prevent degassing at all...the handling was so delicate that it made traditional neo pizza makers look like savages, but when popped in the oven and baked offered me the most amazing oven spring...with this said I may experiment with lower hydrations and see if this spring is still achievable.

Does anyone know what Hydration Anthony Mang. or Mathieu is using?

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #106 on: April 25, 2011, 07:17:35 AM »
Thank you all.

Chau - This cooked a bit longer than normal, and could have gone another 10 seconds in a larger oven. The crispness was that slight, slight veneer shell - not a crunch.

Andre - The dough was not slappable during the stretch. It was gently pushed outwards and then stretched on the peel for final size.

This was made according to the Tartine method with four stretch and folds, bulk overnight in the fridge, balled in the morning, and room temp until bake in the evening. This is, I believe, the workflow used by Bill in his video posted earlier.

John

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #107 on: April 25, 2011, 07:23:49 AM »

This was made according to the Tartine method with four stretch and folds, bulk overnight in the fridge, balled in the morning, and room temp until bake in the evening. This is, I believe, the workflow used by Bill in his video posted earlier.

John

A thing of beauty! I probably do twice the number of folds. Last batch I cut the starter in half and did 24-hour room temp ferment/bulk.

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #108 on: April 25, 2011, 07:38:38 AM »
A thing of beauty! I probably do twice the number of folds. Last batch I cut the starter in half and did 24-hour room temp ferment/bulk.

Thank you Bill. So you did 4% of total dough weight for your room temp 24 hours? Did you notice any changes in the final product? I really liked the convenience of the bulk fridge overnight. I used 20% of a very, very young leaven for this one.

John


Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #109 on: April 25, 2011, 07:45:25 AM »
Thank you Bill. So you did 4% of total dough weight for your room temp 24 hours? Did you notice any changes in the final product? I really liked the convenience of the bulk fridge overnight. I used 20% of a very, very young leaven for this one.

John

John,

Yes, I did like the taste of the final product product better. And yes it was 4%. However, that batch was involved in my experiment using an additional 3" of refractory brick on the floor of the oven. I allowed the oven to over-heat and the pies were over-baked so the texture was not optimum. I have high-expectations for the next batch. Unfortunately, I am on a killer deadline so I don't think I'll be baking much for a few weeks.  :(

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #110 on: April 25, 2011, 07:48:41 AM »
John,

Yes, I did like the taste of the final product product better. And yes it was 4%. However, that batch was involved in my experiment using an additional 3" of refractory brick on the floor of the oven. I allowed the oven to over-heat and the pies were over-baked so the texture was not optimum. I have high-expectations for the next batch. Unfortunately, I am on a killer deadline so I don't think I'll be baking much for a few weeks.  :(

So sorry to hear work is interfering with your baking! Thanks for the additional info - a final question: what is your ambient room temp this time of year?

John

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #111 on: April 25, 2011, 07:51:32 AM »
So sorry to hear work is interfering with your baking! Thanks for the additional info - a final question: what is your ambient room temp this time of year?

John

Ambient temp is ~68F. During folding I keep the dough on the kitchen counter, but the rest of the bulk ferment and the proofing was done in my modified wine cooler at exactly 65F.

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #112 on: April 26, 2011, 08:45:44 PM »
Wow, that is lovely.  See, once you consider what would be good on pizza instead of what should be on pizza, the world turns from sepia into Kodachrome!

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #113 on: April 28, 2011, 01:53:00 PM »
As a follow up on that last pizza, I have to comment on the reheat - which was just as soft as a pillow. No toughness at all. This is a really great dough all around.

John

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #114 on: April 28, 2011, 03:24:24 PM »
That is the true test:  How is the dough the next day?  I haven't figured it out for the kitchen oven, but ones done in the WFO are almost just as good the next day (of course I re-heat them with a 1400 degree heat gun, which helps).

parallei

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #115 on: April 29, 2011, 10:12:02 PM »
Not sure what the problem 100% 00 and I have.  Typical turn/folds over 2 hrs.  4% Starter, 60% HR and 2% Salt.  Meant to go 24 hrs @ room temp., but ended up 26 hrs room temp., balled into fridge 22 hrs, room temp for 2 hrs.  Dough was tough to work with.  Not extensible.  Thus the big rims.  Had a great flavor though....

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #116 on: April 29, 2011, 10:30:56 PM »
Not sure what the problem 100% 00 and I have.  Typical turn/folds over 2 hrs.  4% Starter, 60% HR and 2% Salt.  Meant to go 24 hrs @ room temp., but ended up 26 hrs room temp., balled into fridge 22 hrs, room temp for 2 hrs.  Dough was tough to work with.  Not extensible.  Thus the big rims.  Had a great flavor though....

Paul - Great looking crumb - they look delicious. I bet the flavor was really complex. You get the yeast action at room temp, and bacteria take over for the cold.

At a "lower" hydration (in Tartine terms) and relatively low amount of salt, the dough may have been fermented to the point where the acids started to toughen up the gluten. Try the same workflow with higher salt, and hydration near 70 and you may get a more extensible dough.

John


parallei

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #117 on: April 29, 2011, 11:24:04 PM »
Quote
At a "lower" hydration (in Tartine terms) and relatively low amount of salt, the dough may have been fermented to the point where the acids started to toughen up the gluten. Try the same workflow with higher salt, and hydration near 70 and you may get a more extensible dough.

Yeah, that's just what I was thinking ;D

Seriously though, the dough did feel fine when I was forced to ball it up at the 26 hr point and put it in the fridge.  I wish I could have baked them at that point, but life got in the way. Thanks for the tips John.

Best,

Paul

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #118 on: April 30, 2011, 07:38:32 AM »
Yes, I bet they would have been perfect at the 26 hour point.

If my two kids are not interrupting my pizza and bread making, I know I am not being a very good parent  ;)

John

Online norma427

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #119 on: May 29, 2011, 07:29:19 PM »
Posted on PizzaQuest this week, Eric Wolfinger (a baker at Tartine) bakes the same dough they used for the bakery into a pizza, if anyone is interested.  It says on the Pizza Quest website this pizza was made with the Country French Dough and yes, great pizza can come from a rinky dink oven as long as the dough is great.

Above Tartine, A Pizza is Made



http://www.fornobravo.com/pizzaquest/webisodes/43-webisodes/212-tartine-upstairs-websode-2.html

Norma

Offline ponzu

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #120 on: May 31, 2011, 01:51:45 PM »
Posted on PizzaQuest this week, Eric Wolfinger (a baker at Tartine) bakes the same dough they used for the bakery into a pizza, if anyone is interested.  It says on the Pizza Quest website this pizza was made with the Country French Dough and yes, great pizza can come from a rinky dink oven as long as the dough is great.

Above Tartine, A Pizza is Made



http://www.fornobravo.com/pizzaquest/webisodes/43-webisodes/212-tartine-upstairs-websode-2.html

Norma

Thanks for posting norma.

To my that pizza looks very uneven with an overly Burnt bottom relative to the top.  It also doesn't look opened enough for my taste.

I am forever endebted to the Tartine brain trust for their insights into fermentation management and bread making, but I don't think I would want to learn how to make pizza from them.

AZ

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #121 on: June 10, 2011, 02:04:31 PM »
Getting back in the swing of making pizzas. The Tartine method applied to Neapolitan dough continues to amaze. Two-day 60F dough with Tuscan starter: Maitake mushrooms, hot coppa, Oaxaca cheese, speck. Tried with and without tomato sauce. Without was definitely best. Also a great dessert pie that I'll post in the appropriate section.


Offline wucactus1

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #122 on: June 10, 2011, 02:18:55 PM »
Bill that plate alone looks amazing!  Your pizzas(insert weird italian culinary kiss off the hand)!  Was this the exact tartine method or was there deviation with amount of turns and folds.  Also is your pizza dough just as jiggly as the bread dough before you divide and ball?  How does the dough handle the balling stage/degassing?

Offline R2-Bayou

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #123 on: June 10, 2011, 02:27:24 PM »
Wow Bill! I'm drooling.. Great photography too. Did you saute the maitakes first, or are they just marinated?
"Wretched excess is just barely enough."

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #124 on: June 10, 2011, 02:27:37 PM »
Kinda/sorta Tartiney - never exact. I fold when I walk through the kitchen and the dough calls out to me. Maybe 6 or 7 foldings over a period of a few hours until the dough holds its volume even after folding. Seems just as jiggly. Sticky at shaping balls - minimal handling since there is no need to develop surface tension. Very easy to slap out. Light, fluffy, ethereal.