Author Topic: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book  (Read 32244 times)

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Offline soapysalsa

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #150 on: August 08, 2011, 04:00:17 AM »
Here is a video showing how I made pizzas using the Tartine method with 70% hydration, Caputo 00 flour, and the Tuscan wild starter. The best crust I have ever eaten - incredibly light and tender and delicious. I'm not going to jump to conclusions like I have in the past after just one batch, but my fork mixer may be retired soon from pizza making. Definitely going to stick with this method for a while.

Please watch in HD if you can



Is there any way to replicate the tartine method with a cold rise perhaps? All the tartine method is, is long rests and multiple kneadings with really wet dough, correct? im sorry, i make it sound so... unmagical. Im sure there is some pixie dust and fairies in there somewhere.


Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #151 on: August 08, 2011, 06:52:25 AM »
Is there any way to replicate the tartine method with a cold rise perhaps? All the tartine method is, is long rests and multiple kneadings with really wet dough, correct? im sorry, i make it sound so... unmagical. Im sure there is some pixie dust and fairies in there somewhere.

A cold rise is part of the main narrative of the book, and is used by the author in his bread production. I believe Bill is still using a cold rise in his workflow as well. There is no pixie dust in the formula, but you are way off on the magic!

John

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #152 on: August 08, 2011, 07:45:34 AM »
A cold rise is part of the main narrative of the book, and is used by the author in his bread production. I believe Bill is still using a cold rise in his workflow as well. There is no pixie dust in the formula, but you are way off on the magic!

John

Latest efforts have been 48 hours @ 60F. The combination of intense heat and high hydration is the key to the texture. The prep process is about getting the highest hydration possible and still get a workable dough. The temps and times for fermentation are more about getting the best flavor from the starter

Offline soapysalsa

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #153 on: August 08, 2011, 03:16:32 PM »
Latest efforts have been 48 hours @ 60F. The combination of intense heat and high hydration is the key to the texture. The prep process is about getting the highest hydration possible and still get a workable dough. The temps and times for fermentation are more about getting the best flavor from the starter

Hmmm... okay. so this is what im trying right now. 1 2/3c water, 3T starter, 2tsp salt, 2c flour. This sorta looks more like soup than dough however. Im folding every half hour for 3 hours. Then i divided it in two made my balls, and stuck it in the fridge. Planning on waiting 3 to 4 days. when i take it out, I plan on letting it rise for a couple hours before sticking it in the oven. How's that? Did i miss any steps?

parallei

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #154 on: August 08, 2011, 06:16:51 PM »
soapysalsa,

If you really used 2 cups of flour and 1 2/3 cups water:

1 2/3 cups water weighs about 14 oz.

2 cups flour could weigh about 8.8 oz to 10.5 oz depending on how you placed it into the measuring cup. So excluding the starter, you would have a hydration ratio* of between:

(14oz / 8.8oz) x 100 = 159%

and

(14/10.5) x 100 = 133%

The hydration most folks have been using for this method is between 65% and 70%.  Check your numbers.  If you really used the volumes listed above (2 cups flour and 1 2/3 cups water) it wouldn't surprise me if you had a soup like dough on you hands.  Also, volume measurements can be tricky at first.  Consider a scale.


*The hydration ratio is the weight of water divided by the weight of flour, expressed as a percentage.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2011, 06:22:38 PM by parallei »

Offline bakerbill

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #155 on: August 08, 2011, 09:33:41 PM »
I have baked Tartine bread twice and it was the best bread I have ever made. So I thought the pizza using Tartine dough would be equally good. But both times the pizza has been disappointing and was not worth the extra effort required by the recipe. I followed directions in the book as carefully as possible including ingredients. Obviously there is something that I need to do differently to get the results that others on this forum have gotten. Perhaps those with more experience with the dough may have suggestions. I welcome them.

bakerbill

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #156 on: August 08, 2011, 10:07:09 PM »
bakerbill,

I know this is a long thread, but see the very first post. I followed the book's directions for making pizzas with the bread dough and I was similarly disappointed. However, by post #57:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12122.msg132086.html#msg132086

you'll see I used my standard Neapolitan-style dough with the Tartine method for mixing and folding and I was able to up the hydration and ended up with best pies I have ever made. High hydration + intense heat = magic.


Offline soapysalsa

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #157 on: August 09, 2011, 03:07:46 PM »
You were definitly right about the soup. Looks like i gotta find a scale. Thanks!

Offline bakerbill

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #158 on: August 14, 2011, 08:47:59 PM »
Bill/SFMN,

Following your suggestion, I made Tartine Pizza using Caputo flour in my Two Stone at 800 degrees.  (The next time I will use my brick oven). In a word, it was outstanding. I couldn't get over the difference. The dough was crusty on the outside, soft on the inside. The Tartine Bread was the best that I have ever baked, and now I can say the same about Tartine Pizza. I am ready to stop looking for a better recipe and procedure. It did everything that I asked. Yes, it is all about high hydration and intense heat.  Thanks so much for your help.

bakerbill


Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #159 on: August 14, 2011, 08:51:27 PM »
Bill/SFMN,

Following your suggestion, I made Tartine Pizza using Caputo flour in my Two Stone at 800 degrees.  (The next time I will use my brick oven). In a word, it was outstanding. I couldn't get over the difference. The dough was crusty on the outside, soft on the inside. The Tartine Bread was the best that I have ever baked, and now I can say the same about Tartine Pizza. I am ready to stop looking for a better recipe and procedure. It did everything that I asked. Yes, it is all about high hydration and intense heat.  Thanks so much for your help.

bakerbill

bakerbill,

So glad you got such great results. It really is a pizza life changer! Wait till you try it in your brick oven. Photos?




 

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