Author Topic: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book  (Read 27037 times)

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Offline Matthew

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #140 on: June 10, 2011, 07:05:28 PM »
Bravo! (AGAIN)

Matt


Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #141 on: June 17, 2011, 02:22:53 PM »
Also wheres the crumb shot?  

OK, so today I finally was able to grab a slice for a crumb shot. This slice from my latest "Chicken Pot Pizza" effort was just about perfect.

Offline Ronzo

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #142 on: June 17, 2011, 02:36:31 PM »
Bill, That is so beautiful. It looks like it's been glazed with glorious melted butter.
Fuggheddabowdit!

~ Ron

Former NY'er living in Texas
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Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #143 on: June 17, 2011, 02:40:36 PM »
Bill, That is so beautiful. It looks like it's been glazed with glorious melted butter.


Thanks, Ron. Actually the edge was brushed with melted butter when it came out of the oven, but not enough to have soaked through to the inside. You see this better in my post on Chicken Pot Pizza:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,14366.msg143505.html#msg143505

Offline Ronzo

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #144 on: June 17, 2011, 05:45:51 PM »
It makes me drool, bro.
Fuggheddabowdit!

~ Ron

Former NY'er living in Texas
http://newtexianbrew.com - http://ronlennex.com/ - http://pinterest.com/NewTexianBrew

parallei

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #145 on: June 24, 2011, 10:35:42 PM »
A couple of more Tartine method on the 2Stone.  50/50 San Felice 00/KASL, 8% Ischia Starter, 2% Salt, 70% overall HR.  Usual method first 4 hrs., into fridge 24 hrs., 2 hrs @ room temp.  I should just stick w/this recipe.......

Online TXCraig1

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #146 on: June 24, 2011, 10:59:36 PM »
I should just stick w/this recipe.......

Very good looking Paul. That dough really springs up. It seems to really perform for you.

CL
Pizza is not bread.

parallei

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #147 on: June 25, 2011, 11:06:53 AM »
Craig,

Yes, it sure does spring.  A bit much ;D  I got less spring when I cut it back to 64% HR a few pies ago, but didn't like the crumb quite as much.  Got all summer to figure it out.

Offline jjdec05

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parallei

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #149 on: July 17, 2011, 10:13:12 PM »
Tonight's Tartine method pies on the 2Stone (50/50 San Felice 00/KASL, 8% Ischia Starter, 2% Salt, 70% overall HR.  Usual method first 4 hrs., into fridge 24 hrs., 2 hrs @ room temp.).

- Potato with Ham, Mozz., and Emmentaler.  Good pie.

- Mozz., pepperoni and tomato.



Offline soapysalsa

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #150 on: August 08, 2011, 04:00:17 AM »
Here is a video showing how I made pizzas using the Tartine method with 70% hydration, Caputo 00 flour, and the Tuscan wild starter. The best crust I have ever eaten - incredibly light and tender and delicious. I'm not going to jump to conclusions like I have in the past after just one batch, but my fork mixer may be retired soon from pizza making. Definitely going to stick with this method for a while.

Please watch in HD if you can

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2SCWE9jZf2w


Is there any way to replicate the tartine method with a cold rise perhaps? All the tartine method is, is long rests and multiple kneadings with really wet dough, correct? im sorry, i make it sound so... unmagical. Im sure there is some pixie dust and fairies in there somewhere.

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #151 on: August 08, 2011, 06:52:25 AM »
Is there any way to replicate the tartine method with a cold rise perhaps? All the tartine method is, is long rests and multiple kneadings with really wet dough, correct? im sorry, i make it sound so... unmagical. Im sure there is some pixie dust and fairies in there somewhere.

A cold rise is part of the main narrative of the book, and is used by the author in his bread production. I believe Bill is still using a cold rise in his workflow as well. There is no pixie dust in the formula, but you are way off on the magic!

John

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #152 on: August 08, 2011, 07:45:34 AM »
A cold rise is part of the main narrative of the book, and is used by the author in his bread production. I believe Bill is still using a cold rise in his workflow as well. There is no pixie dust in the formula, but you are way off on the magic!

John

Latest efforts have been 48 hours @ 60F. The combination of intense heat and high hydration is the key to the texture. The prep process is about getting the highest hydration possible and still get a workable dough. The temps and times for fermentation are more about getting the best flavor from the starter

Offline soapysalsa

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #153 on: August 08, 2011, 03:16:32 PM »
Latest efforts have been 48 hours @ 60F. The combination of intense heat and high hydration is the key to the texture. The prep process is about getting the highest hydration possible and still get a workable dough. The temps and times for fermentation are more about getting the best flavor from the starter

Hmmm... okay. so this is what im trying right now. 1 2/3c water, 3T starter, 2tsp salt, 2c flour. This sorta looks more like soup than dough however. Im folding every half hour for 3 hours. Then i divided it in two made my balls, and stuck it in the fridge. Planning on waiting 3 to 4 days. when i take it out, I plan on letting it rise for a couple hours before sticking it in the oven. How's that? Did i miss any steps?

parallei

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #154 on: August 08, 2011, 06:16:51 PM »
soapysalsa,

If you really used 2 cups of flour and 1 2/3 cups water:

1 2/3 cups water weighs about 14 oz.

2 cups flour could weigh about 8.8 oz to 10.5 oz depending on how you placed it into the measuring cup. So excluding the starter, you would have a hydration ratio* of between:

(14oz / 8.8oz) x 100 = 159%

and

(14/10.5) x 100 = 133%

The hydration most folks have been using for this method is between 65% and 70%.  Check your numbers.  If you really used the volumes listed above (2 cups flour and 1 2/3 cups water) it wouldn't surprise me if you had a soup like dough on you hands.  Also, volume measurements can be tricky at first.  Consider a scale.


*The hydration ratio is the weight of water divided by the weight of flour, expressed as a percentage.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2011, 06:22:38 PM by parallei »

Offline bakerbill

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #155 on: August 08, 2011, 09:33:41 PM »
I have baked Tartine bread twice and it was the best bread I have ever made. So I thought the pizza using Tartine dough would be equally good. But both times the pizza has been disappointing and was not worth the extra effort required by the recipe. I followed directions in the book as carefully as possible including ingredients. Obviously there is something that I need to do differently to get the results that others on this forum have gotten. Perhaps those with more experience with the dough may have suggestions. I welcome them.

bakerbill

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #156 on: August 08, 2011, 10:07:09 PM »
bakerbill,

I know this is a long thread, but see the very first post. I followed the book's directions for making pizzas with the bread dough and I was similarly disappointed. However, by post #57:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12122.msg132086.html#msg132086

you'll see I used my standard Neapolitan-style dough with the Tartine method for mixing and folding and I was able to up the hydration and ended up with best pies I have ever made. High hydration + intense heat = magic.


Offline soapysalsa

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #157 on: August 09, 2011, 03:07:46 PM »
You were definitly right about the soup. Looks like i gotta find a scale. Thanks!

Offline bakerbill

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #158 on: August 14, 2011, 08:47:59 PM »
Bill/SFMN,

Following your suggestion, I made Tartine Pizza using Caputo flour in my Two Stone at 800 degrees.  (The next time I will use my brick oven). In a word, it was outstanding. I couldn't get over the difference. The dough was crusty on the outside, soft on the inside. The Tartine Bread was the best that I have ever baked, and now I can say the same about Tartine Pizza. I am ready to stop looking for a better recipe and procedure. It did everything that I asked. Yes, it is all about high hydration and intense heat.  Thanks so much for your help.

bakerbill

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Pizza from the "Tartine Bread" book
« Reply #159 on: August 14, 2011, 08:51:27 PM »
Bill/SFMN,

Following your suggestion, I made Tartine Pizza using Caputo flour in my Two Stone at 800 degrees.  (The next time I will use my brick oven). In a word, it was outstanding. I couldn't get over the difference. The dough was crusty on the outside, soft on the inside. The Tartine Bread was the best that I have ever baked, and now I can say the same about Tartine Pizza. I am ready to stop looking for a better recipe and procedure. It did everything that I asked. Yes, it is all about high hydration and intense heat.  Thanks so much for your help.

bakerbill

bakerbill,

So glad you got such great results. It really is a pizza life changer! Wait till you try it in your brick oven. Photos?