Author Topic: Ultragrain  (Read 31589 times)

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Offline Mick.Chicago

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #50 on: November 16, 2010, 03:00:21 PM »
I was wondering why Soy, I've never used Soy Oil personally and was wondering if it helped with this particular flour!  I normally don't go beyond Flour, Water, Salt and Yeast for my dough (unless its deep dish)

I'm having a hard time getting an open crumb from this flour. 

I'm breaking down your formula on the first page at the moment. But was waiting on the Soy Oil response :)

« Last Edit: November 16, 2010, 03:02:54 PM by Mick.Chicago »


Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #51 on: November 16, 2010, 07:20:07 PM »
I was wondering why Soy, I've never used Soy Oil personally

That's unusual as soybean oil is by far the most common vegetable oil in the world.  In fact, in the United States vegetable oil is synonymous with soybean oil.

Offline Mick.Chicago

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #52 on: November 16, 2010, 07:56:57 PM »
Sunflower oil is the most common oil were I'm from.

I've never purchased "Vegetable Oil" only, Olive, Corn, and canola. 

Anyway, I used your percentage on the first page and used OO instead, I didn't follow the same method as I couldn't make pie tonight but if I get bad results I will follow your method to the T apart from Soy Bean oil.

Also tried the UltraGrain in some cookie dough and it turned out OK, it needed more sugar than normal to get a nice flavor but it didn't taste healthy  :-\

Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #53 on: November 16, 2010, 08:43:29 PM »
Sunflower oil is the most common oil were I'm from.

I don't want to disagree with you, but that's highly unlikely.  You may see a few extra containers of sunflower oil on the store shelf where you shop in particular, but sunflower oil is a rarer and more expensive oil.  Restaurants (especially with fried food items) even in your area will use the cheapest and most common oil they can get their hands on in most cases.  That would be soybean oil.  The sunflower oil numbers are so small for the United States, they don't even make the USDA list for production or consumption.

http://www.fas.usda.gov/psdonline/psdreport.aspx?hidReportRetrievalName=BVS&hidReportRetrievalID=712&hidReportRetrievalTemplateID=11

Admittedly, palm oil has been inching past soybean oil in terms of raw global production, but its usage is far more varied than just cooking.  You'll find that palm oil is in a lot of cosmetics and industrial products.

I've never purchased "Vegetable Oil" only, Olive, Corn, and canola.

I find that quite remarkable if you cook a lot, but okay.

Anyway, I used your percentage on the first page and used OO instead, I didn't follow the same method as I couldn't make pie tonight but if I get bad results I will follow your method to the T apart from Soy Bean oil.

Also tried the UltraGrain in some cookie dough and it turned out OK, it needed more sugar than normal to get a nice flavor but it didn't taste healthy  :-\

Because I thought you would be familiar with soybean oil once I pointed out that it's often called vegetable oil, I didn't mention that soybean oil has a more neutral flavor than most oils.  In cases where I don't want to taste the oil, I use either rice bran oil (my favorite) or soybean oil.

When it comes to working with whole grain flours, or some semblance thereof, the dough regiment is perhaps the most important factor.  Adding "a little of this or a little of that" for flavor, does little to affect the structure of the grain which shares a great deal of responsibility for crumb texture.  Texture, in turn, can affect flavor by changing the food's profile exposed to the palette.

Offline Mick.Chicago

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #54 on: November 16, 2010, 09:01:59 PM »
Sorry, I forgot to mention I'm originally from the UK, sunflower was always more prominent.

When you speak of regime do you mean the kneading and proofing? 


Thanks for taking the time to respond!

Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #55 on: November 16, 2010, 09:29:26 PM »
Sorry, I forgot to mention I'm originally from the UK, sunflower was always more prominent.

In that case the race is a lot closer.  A search on the UK's Food Standards Agency website yielded 860 results for sunflower oil, and 835 results for soya oil.  Between those two, sunflower oil wins by a hair.  Of course a search for olive oil yields 1500 results.  To me that makes sense.  No matter where you're from, sunflower oil is still on the rare side.

When you speak of regime do you mean the kneading and proofing? 

That is correct.
« Last Edit: November 16, 2010, 09:37:15 PM by November »

Offline Mick.Chicago

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #56 on: November 17, 2010, 08:33:16 PM »
Thanks for your formula November.

Here's a crumb shot of the dough I made with your formula on page one, the only difference is Olive Oil instead of Soy.

Offline norma427

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #57 on: November 17, 2010, 10:40:29 PM »
Thanks for your formula November.

Here's a crumb shot of the dough I made with your formula on page one, the only difference is Olive Oil instead of Soy.

Mick.Chicago,

Your pizza made with November's formula and olive oil looks great!  :)

Norma

Offline charbo

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #58 on: November 18, 2010, 12:49:27 PM »
Mick,

Which are you using -- Eagle Mills All-Purpose or Eagle Mills White Whole Wheat?



Offline Mick.Chicago

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #59 on: November 18, 2010, 03:23:07 PM »
I'm using the All Purpose.

Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #60 on: November 21, 2010, 06:46:45 PM »
Thanks for your formula November.

Here's a crumb shot of the dough I made with your formula on page one, the only difference is Olive Oil instead of Soy.

Well, how about that.  That crumb looks familiar.  Did the flavor meet your expectations?

Offline Mick.Chicago

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #61 on: November 22, 2010, 08:00:10 PM »
It tasted better than I thought it would!   I actually wanted more which is rare for anything claiming to be healthy!

I've had a dough ball in the fridge for coming on five days now too see if a long cold ferment improves it any, but it really doesn't need that much improving.

Thanks for your initial efforts!


 

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