Author Topic: Tendancy for dough to pull back or stretch in 1 direction  (Read 747 times)

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Offline jerrym

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Tendancy for dough to pull back or stretch in 1 direction
« on: November 28, 2010, 06:38:19 AM »
have always found that dough seems to have a tendency to stretch more easily in one direction.

in using a screen or pans this is not really a problem a you can over stretch in the necessary direction and the dough does not move once the tom sauce is on.

since starting to use a peel i've found it ideal to give the peel a quick jolt/shake during loading - this produces an oval pizza. trying to stretch it back on the peel is a recipe for disaster as the dough is then likely to stick.

am i doing something wrong in the dough making process or is it something you just need more practice at.

Nb the pizza in the pic is only cooling on the screen and was assembled on peel


Offline norma427

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Re: Tendancy for dough to pull back or stretch in 1 direction
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2010, 08:16:34 AM »
have always found that dough seems to have a tendency to stretch more easily in one direction.

in using a screen or pans this is not really a problem a you can over stretch in the necessary direction and the dough does not move once the tom sauce is on.

since starting to use a peel i've found it ideal to give the peel a quick jolt/shake during loading - this produces an oval pizza. trying to stretch it back on the peel is a recipe for disaster as the dough is then likely to stick.

am i doing something wrong in the dough making process or is it something you just need more practice at.

Nb the pizza in the pic is only cooling on the screen and was assembled on peel

jerrym,

When I was a new to making pizza, I also had problems with shaping and keeping the pizza round.  I still have the problems sometimes when shaking the peel with the dressed pizza on.  I donít know what release flour you use on your peel or if your dough is a high hydration dough.  Both the flour on the peel and the hydration of the dough can make the pizza stick to the peel.  I use rice flour on my peels.  Other members use other flours on their peels.  In my opinion if you learn to give the peel a quick shake, have some kind or enough flour on your peel and quickly slide the pie into the oven there can be problems, but it all becomes easier with practice.

Norma
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Offline buzz

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Re: Tendancy for dough to pull back or stretch in 1 direction
« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2010, 12:11:40 PM »
I like to experiment with varying oil levels in my dough--the more oil, the more pliable the dough is, and the easier to stretch. Letting the dough relax for 10 minutes or so after punching it down helps.

With less- or no-oil doughs, I use a rolling pin to mimic a professional sheeter, rotating the dough with each stroke of the pin. Some doughs are more stubborn than others at springing back, but I find that with continued rolling pin action I can wrestle any dough into the shape that I want.

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Tendancy for dough to pull back or stretch in 1 direction
« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2010, 06:40:04 PM »
If it is giving you a problem, try it at refrigerator temp.  It is much more amenable to shaping and spreading.

Offline jerrym

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Re: Tendancy for dough to pull back or stretch in 1 direction
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2010, 02:00:37 PM »
but it all becomes easier with practice.

Norma,

many thanks - that's what i was hoping for. i've just got some semolina to try out - it looks good for the job. been using 00 flour on the peel and 65% hydration.

buzz,

i've made deep pan pizza in the past using 8% oil. i've recently switched to thin base and having tried with 8% and without oil i found i preferred the without oil for thin base (quite a surprise to me). i have it in mind to try something like 3% or even 1% at some point.

Tscarborough,

since joining the site i've switched to cold ferment - for sure it's more amenable as you say (in fact a bit too much almost). it still has a tendency (just like warm fermented dough) to stretch more easily in one direction - given the replies i'm happy that i'm not missing anything obvious and it's something to live with and build experience.

many thanks all - put's my mind at rest.


 

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