Author Topic: Pizza Raquel  (Read 196941 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #200 on: January 17, 2006, 11:22:23 AM »
pft,

Thank you for your kind remarks.

The preferment I used was one that was given to me by a good friend who came to Dallas on business. He knew of my interest in making pizzas and wanted me to share what he felt was his best preferment. To prepare for the Raquel dough, I refreshed the preferment with flour and warm water the day before I planned to make the dough. On the following morning, I took the preferment out of the refrigerator and let it warm up and become bubbly. Since it was cool in my kitchen that morning, I put the preferment in my home-made proofing box for about an hour before using it. The temperature of the proofing box was around 80 degrees F. That did the trick. The preferment was nice and bubbly.

You have read my mind on the other questions, especially on the use of only commercial yeast and comparisons between the Raquel and Lehmann doughs. I have not personally made a commercial yeast version of the Raquel dough since I have preferments and like the results they produce. However, I suspect that the only way to know for sure is to do a commercial yeast version. I intend to do this at some point, and have put that experiment on my pizza "to do" list. I am as curious as the folks who email you.

One possibility that does occur to me as an alternative to using a natural preferment is to use a commercial yeast biga. I haven't personally done this with the Raquel formulation, but I would take, say, about 50% of the flour and about 50% of the water (both by weight) in the Raquel formulation and combine them (in a bowl by hand or by using a stand mixer) with all or a good part of the amount of commercial yeast (IDY) you recommend be used. The preferment will have roughly the same hydration and feel as the final dough into which it is to be incorporated. Hence, the preferment will be essentially a biga. I would then let the biga ferment for about 4 or 5 hours at room temperature (the warmer the better), and then combine it with the rest of the ingredients called for by the Raquel formulation. This might require some modification of your processing steps, but I believe it can be done while retaining the rest periods and the like. The objective of the biga, of course, would be to improve the crust flavor. The longer the biga ferments and ripens, the more intense that crust flavor will be.

I have no idea as to why the worm hole formed in my Raquel pizza. It was throughout the rim, just as seems to happen with a lot of your pizzas. I will have to think that one through to see if there is a logical explanation.

On the matter of the comparison between the Raquel and Lehmann doughs, I decided as I was making the Raquel pizza to try to incorporate the processing techniques you developed for the Raquel dough formulation into the next Lehmann dough I make. In fact, that was one of the first thoughts I had in mind when I awoke this morning. Since I am awash in leftover pizza slices from my recent pizza making efforts, I may wait until my inventory of pizza slices is reduced before making a Raquel-inspired Lehmann dough. Raquel and Lehmann. I think Tom would like the pairing.

Peter
« Last Edit: February 17, 2006, 09:18:13 AM by Pete-zza »


Offline duckjob

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #201 on: January 20, 2006, 02:34:09 PM »
Thankyou both for the nice comments... On a seperate note, up until just recently I had made Pizza Raquel pretty much exclusively for about 7 months straight with IDY only. There was a noticeable taste difference going from the IDY to the preferment, but aside from that it handles and looks more or less the same. Also the pies that I made with IDY always got at least three days in the fridge, so there was ample time for flavor to develop as well. Now that I have cooked a few pies with a preferment, I don't anticipate going back, but I would say it is definately possible to make  a pretty good Pizza Raquel without a preferment.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #202 on: January 23, 2006, 12:36:06 PM »
pft,

In an earlier post, Reply #199, you asked me about comparisons between the core Raquel and Lehmann dough recipes. Since I have never considered the two doughs to be particularly comparable--although there are obvious similarities--the question prompted me to make a Lehmann dough pretty much the way I usually do but using the Raquel dough making instructions instead of my usual instructions. This included using the two autolyse-like rest periods, one at the beginning and the other at the end. As our regular readers may recall, I have experimented on occasion with using an autolyse rest period for the Lehmann dough. However, except when I used an autolyse in conjunction with a natural preferment, I found the crust to be more breadlike and more tender than I personally prefer. So I have not made autolyse as a part of my standard operating procedure for the Lehmann dough, as you have done with your Raquel formulation.

For the experiment, I decided to use a standard Lehmann dough recipe for a 16-inch pie. I used only commercial yeast (IDY) and a small amount of oil (as I also did recently with the Raquel dough). The dough making process followed the exact sequence set forth in Reply #24 (page 2) of this thread, except for the use of IDY only (i.e., no preferment) and the incorporation of the oil into the dough (just before the final kneading step, as I also did with the recent Raquel dough). The dough was subjected to about 3 days of cold fermentation, just as I did recently when I made the Raquel dough.

When time came to shape and stretch the dough, it handled very well, somewhat better than my usual Lehmann dough, but it was still quite extensible. I did not feel that it handled as well as the recent Raquel dough, which had a better balance between elasticity and extensibility. I have no explanation for this. Maybe it was because I did not use a natural preferment as I did with the Raquel dough. The only other material differences were the hydration percent—63% for the Lehmann dough versus 60% for the Raquel dough—and the fact that the Lehmann dough weighed quite a bit more than the Raquel dough—about 21 ounces compared with about 13 ounces for the Raquel dough. The increased hydration and the added weight and the effects of gravity when stretching and shaping the larger amount of the Lehmann dough may have possibly contributed to the increased extensibility of the dough.

After dressing the dough (for a vegetarian pizza), I baked the pizza in the same manner as I usually do. The photos below show the finished pizza.

While I liked the pizza, I found the crust to be too breadlike and a bit too soft for my personal taste, particularly in the part of the crust away from the rim. This was just as I have experienced in the past with the Lehmann doughs when I used the autolyse rest periods and commercial yeast. So, for me the question remains open whether it is the use of a preferment that is the critical element of the process rather than the use of autolyse. A logical next step to try to find the answer is to either make another Raquel dough but use only commercial yeast, or make a preferment version of the Lehmann dough with a double autolyse. That will allow me to make more direct comparisons between the two doughs. 

Peter

Offline scott r

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #203 on: January 23, 2006, 01:00:26 PM »
Peter, I do notice a difference in the texture of my pies when I use a preferment vs. commercial yeast even when I utilize the exact same recipe and dough processing techniques.  For my tastes, the preferment pies are clearly better in not only flavor, but also in texture.  I am anxiously awaiting your next comparison pies.

Offline pftaylor

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #204 on: February 05, 2006, 02:54:36 PM »
I made a batch of KASL based Pizza Raquel four days ago and decided to make three eleven inch skins before the big game. The TEC temperature was in the high 700's (as I think I remember it). So I did not achieve the char I normally like but hey it was close enough.

I also decided to try something entirely new for the first time. I know, I know, some of the membership are thinking that I try new stuff all the time and they are right. I will not give up. In my opinion, I have maxed out the available heat (till a Neapolitan oven is built), the crust recipe, the cheese, but not the sauce. But boy have I been experimenting with sauce.

I have tried every combination of spices and brands of canned tomatoes known to mankind. I kept on getting closer and closer to my ideal as I moved from canned tomatoes to whole raw tomatoes. In particular Ugly Ripes. But everytime I would advance one step I would inevitably take a half step back by spiking the ground up tomato pulp with still yet another concoction of spices.

Here's the breakthrough: I didn't add any spices to the sauce at all.

Guess what? The pie tasted better. Lots better. It was in more overall balance. The sauce tasted like fresh tomatoes and not some variation of spaghetti sauce. Some of the better pizzerias in NYC, like Grimaldi's, must use freshly ground up tomatoes of some sort (or high quality canned) and then add a sweetener because their sauce tastes just like that - sweetened tomatoes. Objectionable to me on certain levels but it does convey a sense of freshness which has eluded my home efforts these many years.  What prompted my line of thinking in this area was my recent trip to NYC and Patsy's Pizzeria. Their canned sauce had no spices added at all from what I could tell and yet somehow I thought it still tasted better than what I had developed. Patsy's uses just plain canned tomatoes and probably adds just a spoon to spread it out on the pie. Their sauce tastes extremely fresh and while they put a tad too much on for my personal tastes, it serves its purpose gracefully. That grace, in my opinion, is to blend the flavors of bottom crisp crust, fluffy middle crust, gummy top crust, tomatoes and cheese perfectly by allowing each flavor to come through on their own terms. No one ingredient is overpowered by the other but rather exist in harmony.

That's what I have been looking for all this time and it was so simple I didn't even think to go there. So here is my new position; I will only buy fresh tomatoes and add spices such as oregano, basil, salt, pepper, and garlic AFTER the pie is baked not before. No longer will I add countless spice variations to my sauce. I have finally concluded that doing so masks the fresh flavor profile I desire. Sounds too simple right?

But sometimes simple is more when it comes to home pizza making.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2006, 04:53:37 PM by pftaylor »
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Offline foodblogger

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #205 on: February 06, 2006, 04:24:21 PM »
Pftaylor,
Its tough to improve on the flavor of fresh tomatoes.  When I use fresh tomatoes to make a sauce I usually let them ripen on the counter for a few days.  This time of year the tomatoes in the store can be a little grainy if you don't let them soften a bit.  I like to put them under the broiler for just a few minutes until the skin blackens in a few spots.  I peel off most of the blackened skin but I like to leave a little in there for flavor/coloring/texture.  To get the right texture I run the broiled tomatoes through a food mill. 

Yesterday I made a Margherita with tomatoes processed in this way.  For 4 roma tomatoes I added about a teaspoon of sea salt.  Delicious!

Those look like nice pies, I am sure the family was pleased.

Offline Wazza McG

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #206 on: February 06, 2006, 04:51:07 PM »
I agree with you as well foodblogger - I remove the seeds however to prevent too much biiterness and process the flesh only and then add equal amount of sea salt, sugar, minced garlic and basil.   I will only pre-cook the tomato flesh if it looks too watery - so a slight reduction in liquid may be required.  >:D

Wazza McG

PS.  PFTaylor - did I detect a slight pinkish tinge to your crust in your photo's on this page with those great pics? reminds me of a dab of red wine in my early days to the dough ;-)
« Last Edit: February 06, 2006, 04:58:10 PM by Wazza McG »
Fair Dinkum - you want more Pizza!  Crikey ! I've run out out them prawny thingymebobs again!

Offline pftaylor

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #207 on: February 06, 2006, 07:58:45 PM »
foodblogger,
Much of the humble success I have achieved with home pizza making required questioning conventional wisdom. When I finally got around to scrutinizing pizza sauce I had to think outside the box in order to climb higher up the pizza mountain. I now hold a heterodox belief with respect to pizza sauce and am very proud of my newfound position. The view is delicious.

I also added Sicilian sea salt to my latest effort - immediately after grilling though. The flavor quotient sky-rocketed as a result. This experience has also reminded me of the trip I took to DiFara's in Brooklyn last year. Dom had a host of spices laying about his counter area for all to use. He is generally considered to be the king of quality ingredients and I do not seem to remember him adding anything to his sauce either. My current tomato of choice is the Florida Ugly Ripe. It is expensive as tomatoes go but only costs a few pennies more per pie. I have yet to find it's equal - though I'm told some exist. I look forward to enjoying those varieties some day. I also have San Marzano seeds which I hope to plant this spring.

Wazza McG,
No I didn't add any wine to Pizza Raquel - but I did have a glass with my slices!
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Offline foodblogger

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #208 on: February 07, 2006, 09:18:53 AM »
pftaylor,
Your family is very lucky.  :pizza:

Offline pftaylor

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #209 on: February 11, 2006, 01:16:23 PM »
Not only is my family lucky, but my special friends as well. Take a look at what I am planning for their arrival to Chez Taylor tomorrow.

Menu for February 12th, 2006

Pizze Raquel

• Fior Di’ Latte Fresh Mozzarella,
• Locally Grown Heirloom Tomatoes,
• Fresh Basil From Chef’s Personal Garden,
• Sicilian Sea Salt


Pizze I Funghi Conj Pepperoni

• Fior Di’ Latte Fresh Mozzarella,
• Locally Grown Heirloom Tomatoes,
• Sautéed Cremini Mushrooms,
• Boars Head Pepperoni


Pizze Paisano

• Fior Di’ Latte Fresh Mozzarella,
• TEC Roasted Onions,
• TEC Roasted Hot Italian Sausage,
• Locally Grown Heirloom Tomatoes


Personalize Your Pizze

• EVOO (Extra Virgin Olive Oil),
• Classic Basil, Oregano, Marjoram, Thyme, Rosemary, and Sage,
• Fresh Basil and Arugula From Chef’s Personal Garden,
• Sicilian Sea Salt, Crystal Kosher Salt, and Fine Mediterranean Sea Salt,
• Parmesan, Asiago, Pecorino Romano, & Aged Provolone Cheeses,
• Five Seed Flavored Crust – Caraway, Flax, Poppy, Sesame, and Fennel

Hopefully my friends will allow time for photographs of my work.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2006, 10:13:25 AM by pftaylor »
Pizza Raquel is Simply Everything You’d Want.
www.wood-firedpizza.com


Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #210 on: February 11, 2006, 02:09:05 PM »
Can I be a member of your family? A special friend? I have references. ;D

Bill/SFNM

Offline pftaylor

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #211 on: February 11, 2006, 02:14:30 PM »
Bill/SFNM,
You already are a special friend. Bring Pizza Lolita over and we'll have a great time...
Pizza Raquel is Simply Everything You’d Want.
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #212 on: February 17, 2006, 09:57:18 AM »
The last time I made the Raquel dough and reported on my results, at Reply # 198 of this thread, I mentioned that I was planning to attempt another Raquel dough based on the use of only instant dry yeast (IDY) as the sole leavening agent, along with two rest periods. What I was attempting to determine is whether an all-IDY Raquel dough produces results comparable to a Raquel dough using a natural preferment.

Over the last few days, I attempted an all-IDY Raquel dough. In doing this, I simply used the amount (by baker’s percent) of IDY recommended by pftaylor for the all-IDY version of his Raquel formulation--which is more than he recommends when he uses a small amount of IDY with his preferment. The formulation I ended up with was as follows:

100%, High-gluten flour (King Arthur Sir Lancelot), 8.40 oz. (237.79 g.), 1 c. + 1 T. + 1 t.
60%, Water, 5.03 oz. (142.67 g.), 5/8 c.
2%, Sea salt, 0.17 oz. (4.76 g.), a bit less than 7/8 t.
0.23%, Instant dry yeast (IDY), 0.02 oz. (0.54 g.), 0.18 t. (about 1/8 t. plus half that again)
Total dough ball weight (for one 15-inch pizza) = 13.64 oz. (385.76 g.)
Thickness factor (TF) = 0.077

The processing of the dough was essentially identical to the procedures I used the last time, including the use of the two rest periods. The dough was cold fermented for a bit over 3 days, as was the case with the last Raquel dough. During that time, the dough hardly rose at all. It simply spread and flattened out. When I used the dough, I allowed it to warm up at room temperature until it reached a temperature of around 62 degrees F. I then shaped and stretched the dough into a 15-inch skin. I had no problem doing this although the dough was quite a bit more extensible and therefore more difficult to handle than the last Raquel dough in which I used a natural preferment. This leads me to believe that using a preferment alters the dough texture characteristics and handling qualities in a way that appears to be materially different than when only commercial yeast is used. In fact, it's possible that the use of a preferment is as critical to the final dough characteristics as the use of rest periods.

Once I dressed the skin, I baked it in the same manner as the previous Raquel pizza. This time, I got fancier with the toppings. In keeping with the high-class nature of this thread and pftaylor’s high-quality productions, my “menu” for my pizza was as follows:

Pizze Pietro
 La Regina DOP San Marzano tomatoes, with a reduction of can juices
 Fresh fior di latte mozzarella cheese
 Imported Italian provolone cheese
 Spicy Italian sopresatta, julienned
 Hand-cut pepperoni sausage
 Sweet onion confit, with 10-yr.old Balsamic vinegar (from Trader Joe’s)
 Dried Sicilian wild oregano (origano selvatico)
 Imported extra-virgin olive oil, first cold press
 Sicilian sea salt infused with basil (sale al basilico)
 French white truffle oil
 Freshly-grated Reggiano-Pamigiano and grana padano cheeses
 Wine accompaniment: Allegrini Valpolicella Classico, 2003

The finished pizza was very good. The crust had nice flavor and all of the toppings harmonized and balanced very nicely. But my attentions this time were directed primarily to the crust. It was chewy and flavorful and I fully enjoyed it. But I would definitely give the edge to the Raquel version using the preferment. This is consistent with my past experience (and, I believe, those of other members) in making both preferment and non-preferment versions of otherwise identical doughs. In my opinion, preferments are in a class by themselves, and using them will invariably produce superior results. That is not to detract in any way from an all-IDY crust. It’s just hard for IDY or any other commercial yeast to compete in the flavor and texture departments with preferments. Consequently, if a preferment is available, I would recommend its use.

The photos below show the finished pizza.

Peter

Offline foodblogger

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #213 on: February 17, 2006, 10:27:08 AM »
Man that looks delicious pete!  I would tear that up.  How did you use the white truffle oil?  Just drizzle it on or spread it with a brush or blend it in with other ingredients?

The first time I had white truffles was at Charlie Trotter's in Chicago.  They have the most amazing flavor, very similar to aged parmesan cheese.  The oil would probably taste very good on a pizza.

On the subject of preferments - I definately agree that they make the crust taste better.  In fact, my company last week prefered the pre-ferment crust to the regular IDY crust.  I have since abandoned straight IDY thin crust pizzas. 

One problem with wild-yeasted preferments is that you can accidently use the culture at different activity levels and rise times/dough characteristics become difficult to predict.  To solve that problem I add a tiny amount of IDY to the final dough.  I used to make a ton of sourdough bread and I had the most amazing wild-yeast culture growing but my wife threw it out.  The IDY trick added consistancy to my breads and widened the margin of error a little.  Sadly, the most I can get away with right now is a 48 hour preferment using IDY.  No wild-yeast cultures for me for a while until she forgets that I am banned.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #214 on: February 17, 2006, 10:58:24 AM »
foodblogger,

I just drizzle a bit of the truffle oil on each slice of pizza as I am ready to eat it. I don't drizzle it over the pizza before baking because I am not sure what the oven heat will do to the truffle oil. Also, not everyone likes the taste of truffle oil. I got the idea of using the truffle oil with pepperoni from Fireside Pies, a local pizza spot in Dallas. I like the combination a lot. The sopressata is also a nice addition.

I have been more fortunate than others with my Texas-bred preferment. However, I use a proofing box to help get the preferment to work faster, especially in the winter where it is harder to get the preferment really active at room temperature. I think the trick with preferments is to use them as much as possible. In fact, fellow member scott has abandoned using commercial yeast altogether. Many people would consider that tantamount to walking a high wire without a net. Neither he nor I use any commercial yeast with our preferments. Both of us feel that a pure preferment works best all by itself.

One of the things I would like to try sometime with the all-IDY Raquel formulation is to see if there is a way of getting better crust flavor without using a natural preferment. I am thinking along the lines of a 4-5 hour, room-temperature fermented biga using only commercial yeast, which would be easier to make and more predictable I think than a natural preferment.

Peter

Offline foodblogger

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #215 on: February 17, 2006, 11:45:08 AM »
Quote
I don't drizzle it over the pizza before baking because I am not sure what the oven heat will do to the truffle oil.

Thats probably smart.  I bet it would smoke like crazy or denature enough so that it didn't taste the same.

Quote
However, I use a proofing box to help get the preferment to work faster, especially in the winter where it is harder to get the preferment really active at room temperature. I think the trick with preferments is to use them as much as possible.

Yeah.  Using a proofing box controls the environment so much better.  It reminds me of my time in the lab.  We had 37 degree celsius humidified cabinets to grow our bacteria in.  When I get all done with my training I am going to do a serious upgrade to my baking setup.  I am going to go crazy!  We're talking temperature and humidity controlled proofing cabinets, a wood-fired brick oven, the works.

When you say use them as much as possible do you mean use a large amount of it in your dough or use your culture often?  When I was doing a lot of sourdough I was using my culture very often and refreshing it a lot.  My culture did get a lot better with so much culling/maintanence.

Quote
I am thinking along the lines of a 4-5 hour, room-temperature fermented biga using only commercial yeast, which would be easier to make and more predictable I think than a natural preferment.

From my experience it takes at least 12 hours for an IDY biga to start getting a hint of sourness.  Letting it go 48 hours makes it pretty darn tasty, although not as tasty as a wild-yeast culture.  You should try my method for using an IDY preferment and adding it to the dough.  For pizza-raquel you would just need to figure out what 20% of the dough would weigh and go from there.  For example if the dough you were making up was going to weigh 400 grams, your preferment would weigh 80 grams.  I then make up an preferment with 40 grams water, 40 grams flour and half the yeast, although it sounds like you would be more likely to add all of the yeast.  Then to finish the dough I subtract the 40 grams flour and 40 grams water from the recipe amounts and go from there.  I have a hard time planning what I am going to eat more than 72 hours in advance so I only do a 24 hour cold fermentation after mixing the dough.  Doing all that would probably be too much of a departure from the pizza-raquel method to make a good comparison though.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2006, 11:51:59 AM by foodblogger »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #216 on: February 17, 2006, 12:21:30 PM »
foodblogger,

I was referring to the frequency of use of the preferment, not the amount. Like you, when I use my preferment I use around 20%.

The idea of using a short room-temperature fermented biga came from Tom Lehmann, who recommended it (without calling it a biga) as a way of getting better crust flavor in a dough that is to be used as part of a take-and-bake pizza. I tried it--using his NY style dough formulation as a baseline--and thought the pizza crust was one of the tastiest I had made. However, I changed a lot of other things--from the formulation, to the dough preparation and the baking of the pizza--so I couldn't tell whether it was something else that was responsible for the good crust flavor. I have been doing more work on take-and-bake to see if I can come up with something that can be prepared in advance and be baked in a normal home oven directly on an oven rack. The last take-and-bake pizza dough I made used a classic poolish approach but the results were not as good as the biga approach. I think that some of these principles can be applied to the Raquel formulation. I was thinking of something that would be simple for others to make and use, which led me to the idea of using the short-term biga approach.

Peter

Offline pftaylor

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #217 on: February 18, 2006, 07:14:48 AM »
Pete-zza,
Thank you for the chuckle from your latest posts. It is always a pleasure to read about another truly having fun with Raquel or one of her sisters. They bring a broad smile to my face every time I think about them and it appears they have accomplished the same for you.

The two main points you brought up - rest periods and use of a preferment, do add significantly to what I feel makes Raquel special and unlike any other. During the trail and error period of Raquel formula experimentation, incorporation of rest periods and use of the preferment resulted in huge and immediate leaps in the quality of Raquel. It was almost as if, after months of relentless effort, everything finally clicked. 

Your results mimic my own experiences. Pizza Raquel is superior in every way when a preferment is used. I shall not knowingly go without it's use again.

On another note, our good friend, Rose of Penn Mac (who seems to be smiling a bit more these days since the ref ruled Ben crossed the goal line), shipped four pounds of a cheese I had thought was discontinued. Sam's Club stopped carrying Polly-O's Fresh Mozzarella log about a year ago. Upon calling Kraft, they informed me the product was discontinued. Thinking the pizza gods had cursed my hobby I woefully moved on to Biazza cheese. Biazza was more expensive but didn't perform as well as the Polly - O. This move had a material negative impact on the taste of my pizzas and also made them look different. I had to resort to chunking the cheese on rather then my preferred sliced look. I also had to add more salt to extract any kind of taste on top of the pie after grilling and sometimes I added EVOO as an extra booster. With the Polly - O, I found that adding salt and/or EVOO was purely optional and not a necessity as the cheese contained wonderful flavor on its own.

When I called Rose a few days back to inquire about restocking some various pizza supplies, I happened to ask about the Polly - O cheese listed on their web site. She confirmed that it was the porcelain white two pound log I was looking for. So I decided to buy a couple of logs just to make sure. The truth is Kraft did discontinue their Fresh Mozzarella two lb log through retail channels like Sam's Club. However, it can still be sourced through food distribution channels such as Penn Mac.

Long time readers may remember I concluded this cheese to be ideal for a NY pie. It can be sliced thin. It holds up to blistering heat very well, and it tastes great. Only problem now is cost. All in it cost about $.50 per ounce (including shipping) to source which is considerably more than what I paid Sam's in the past. But the point is this, try Polly - O's Fresh Mozzarella and see if it works for you like it has for me. Price then won't be so much of an issue because of the value it delivers.
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Offline pftaylor

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #218 on: February 18, 2006, 09:06:38 PM »
Last weekend I had friends over for the Pro Bowl and we had pizza. I unfortunately did not have time to take any photographs. Tonight however, I was able to take a handful of shots of Pizza Raquel adorned with Polly - O Fresh Mozzarella.

All I can say is, there is a huge difference between Polly - O Fresh Mozzarella and Biazzo Fresh Mozzarella. Polly - O is so much better it isn't even a contest. The flavor profile is nearly identical to what the elite pizzerias use in NYC. When you factor in the fact that it doesn't easily burn, you have a solid winner.
Pizza Raquel is Simply Everything You’d Want.
www.wood-firedpizza.com

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Raquel
« Reply #219 on: February 19, 2006, 12:00:10 PM »
I recently had occasion to try a Polly-O mozzarella cheese for the first time. It came in an 8-oz. package labeled "Gourmet Mozzarella Cheese". It was soft and flavorful and held up very well to baking, without much in the way of browning even after a long bake time. I was able to slice it into thin slices despite its softness.

Since I found the cheese at the Central Market, possibly the most expensive food market in Dallas, if not all of Texas, it was not cheap. But it's the only place where I have seen any Polly-O cheese in the Dallas area. 

Peter