Author Topic: Varasano's 2011  (Read 11413 times)

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scott123

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Re: Varasano's 2011
« Reply #40 on: April 06, 2012, 04:16:16 PM »
Surrounded, oh no!  :o

I warn you, I am armed (with pizza) and will shoot eat my way out if I have to.


Offline varasano

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Re: Varasano's 2011
« Reply #41 on: May 03, 2012, 02:16:09 PM »
Great Post. Sorry I wasn't smiling in the photos, LOL. 

Just to touch on a few questions that were raised in the videos.

My oven can hit any temp. It's no where near maxed out. The problem with getting that leoparding color is really the way that southerners eat the pizza. If there are 8 people at a table and they all order a plain Margheritas, and I deliver a pie to the table, it will usually go to just one customer who will wait for each other guest to get the exact same pie before taking a single bite. There's almost no sharing. And if a person is telling a story, everyone waits 10 minutes while the food gets cold before they take the first bite. And often this is with a knife and fork, rather than picking up and folding. So I have no choice but to slow down the bake and crisp up the pies. I'm in the 3:00 - 3:30 range most of the time.  Part of this dynamic is the fact that I set up Varasano's as a full serve restaurant. The new Airport unit, which starts construction in about 3 months, will be a quick serve unit. Pretty much the same pizza menu, but in a quick serve format.  I think the oven will be cranked up a bit hotter in that case.   But either way, I don't really mind the slower bake. I do wish that people would eat quicker while it's crispy, but I'm not in love with 1 minute bakes myself. 
 

Offline varasano

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Re: Varasano's 2011
« Reply #42 on: May 03, 2012, 02:20:43 PM »
I do like the glad containers, not just because they keep the dough from drying out, but as was pointed out, the scraper that's used to release the dough from a box can break the light texture a bit.  I actually have a new process that's actually giving me the best dough I've ever made. It uses neither the box nor the glad containers. My staff absolutely loves it most of the time but if dough is warmed up for service and it's not used and is put back in the fridge, the new process ruins most the dough. The gladware, in constrast, is still fine.  So I'm only making part of my dough this way. I'm trying to move over to it altogether but not yet.  I'm really hoping to work out the kinks.

Offline varasano

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Re: Varasano's 2011
« Reply #43 on: May 03, 2012, 02:36:17 PM »
Regarding slapping out the dough quickly.

Our dough does slap out pretty easily.  This is one issue that really has to be resolved when going from home bake to commercial.  You just don't have the time to do it slow with customers waiting. I'm actually no pro at it myself - my staff is way better. When I bake myself I often spread it half way, then wait 30 seconds and continue. It lets the dough relax and the 2nd stretch is way easier. But I don't work the line during service.

The dough itself is pretty wet. I still think that's more important than the machine. My hand mixed doughs were virtually the same and I didn't work them much.