Author Topic: Oven Mod - Resister Method/Turbo Switch  (Read 4556 times)

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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Oven Mod - Resister Method/Turbo Switch
« Reply #20 on: April 11, 2013, 12:24:25 PM »
This chart shows, given the same data as above, the relationship between resistor ohm value and the predicted oven temp when the oven is set to 550F (the theoretical max temp). You can see how rapidly the danger increases when the resistor ohm value drops below 10K.
Pizza is not bread.


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Oven Mod - Resister Method/Turbo Switch
« Reply #21 on: April 11, 2013, 12:24:44 PM »
One last thing to consider with respect to safety. In addition to the multiple warnings above, consider that adding a resistor of any value will make your oven easily capable of reaching temperatures well above the autoignition temperature of most anything you will put it in. Donít do this, it is not smart. If you choose not to listen and do it anyway, have a fire extinguisher handy.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline benji99

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Re: Oven Mod - Resister Method/Turbo Switch
« Reply #22 on: April 11, 2013, 12:32:18 PM »
Thanks all, really appreciate the insight and information. I do have an extinguisher handy. I really do understand the risk and appreciate all the warnings and such.

My plan is to add a resistor that will allow the temperature to max out at 650 degrees (when set at 550 degrees), a mere 100 degrees above the max temperature and well below the temperature the oven reaches during a cleaning cycle.

Thanks again everyone.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Oven Mod - Resister Method/Turbo Switch
« Reply #23 on: April 11, 2013, 12:33:47 PM »
Thanks all, really appreciate the insight and information. I do have an extinguisher handy. I really do understand the risk and appreciate all the warnings and such.

My plan is to add a resistor that will allow the temperature to max out at 650 degrees (when set at 550 degrees), a mere 100 degrees above the max temperature and well below the temperature the oven reaches during a cleaning cycle.

Thanks again everyone.

Given what I told you above, what would be the ohm value of that resistor? (recognizing that you would need to collect data for your oven and recalculate everything based on that data).
Pizza is not bread.

Offline benji99

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Re: Oven Mod - Resister Method/Turbo Switch
« Reply #24 on: April 11, 2013, 12:42:23 PM »
Given what I told you above, what would be the ohm value of that resistor? (recognizing that you would need to collect data for your oven and recalculate everything based on that data).

Without doing the math, somewhere around 20k ohm? Perhaps a bit more?

Offline scott123

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Re: Oven Mod - Resister Method/Turbo Switch
« Reply #25 on: April 11, 2013, 12:45:46 PM »
One last thing to consider with respect to safety. In addition to the multiple warnings above, consider that adding a resistor of any value will make your oven easily capable of reaching temperatures well above the autoignition temperature of most anything you will put it in. Donít do this, it is not smart. If you choose not to listen and do it anyway, have a fire extinguisher handy.

 ^^^

While I like to see people who know what they're doing attempt these hacks, because I think it adds to the knowledge base in such as way that, eventually, less saavy DIYers might get a better sense of direction... at this point, no offense, but I don't think this is for anyone that's asking questions.

I come from two generations of electricians and have studied ovens for countless hours, and I wouldn't go near this.  At least, not at this point.

If you've got an electric oven, chances are very high that it both has a broiler and will hit 550.  If it can do both, 1/2" steel plate will get you 2.5 minute NY bakes in a manner that won't ever burn your house down, and, while steel won't give you Neapolitan bake times, if you're only going to 650, it doesn't sound like Neapolitan is your goal.

Even if Neapolitan is the goal, I don't think this answer.  Being able to increase the temperature of the oven, at will, is far secondary to broiler strength when it comes to Neapolitan.  Either you've got a freakishly hot broiler and you can do NP, or you don't and you can't.  If the broiler is close, this might push it over the top, but I wouldn't attempt this first- or, as I said before, ever, if I wasn't 110% comfortable. 
« Last Edit: April 11, 2013, 12:48:29 PM by scott123 »

Offline Tannerwooden

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Re: Oven Mod - Resister Method/Turbo Switch
« Reply #26 on: April 11, 2013, 11:32:33 PM »
If it can do both, 1/2" steel plate will get you 2.5 minute NY bakes in a manner that won't ever burn your house down

What is the recovery time on a steel plate?  I would love to bake at lower temps if it is really possible. Currently, I'm baking at around 750 with a stone. I use a screen as well because it seems to help prevent burning, and reduce the amount of bench flour I have to use.  I HATE the long preheat time (1 hr, 20 min.), and I know I'm overworking my oven.  Also, the recovery time between pies is close to 15 minutes.

I have tried putting bricks in the bottom of my oven to increase thermal mass. It helps. With 5 bricks, my preheat time goes up to 2 hrs, 10 mins, but my recovery time drops to around 10 minutes. That is fine for pizza night with the family, but it makes for a very long pizza party with Tanner stuck in the kitchen most of the time.

If a steel plate is the answer, please let me know!!!

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Oven Mod - Resister Method/Turbo Switch
« Reply #27 on: April 12, 2013, 04:28:15 AM »
One other thing should be mentioned about doing this in your house then enough warnings have been said. If the worst thing happens and you do have a fire, hopefully no one is hurt, there will be a fire investigator to look at the origin of the fire. Most of these guys are pretty good, I know some. Point of origin will obviously be kitchen, then the oven, then why the oven, then they figure out someone was dinking around with bypassing the safety features of the oven, then insurance conpany walks away free and clear and you have nothing because you voided everything and nothing is covered. I would get a cheap giveaway stove and do this outside if one must do it. Fires are sneaky critters and can start LONG before you notice it going on. Please think about this, if it happens, it's too late and no reset button!! 23 years of working critical care I have seen it all and more than anyone should, it happens in seconds!! nuff saud.

jon
Save A Cow, Eat A Vegan....Totally Organic And Hormone Free!!


 

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