Author Topic: vital wheat gluten  (Read 4218 times)

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Offline malvanova

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vital wheat gluten
« on: May 04, 2011, 10:49:06 AM »
 Hello everyone , maybe Pete-zza can answer this question or anyone can chime in , I inherited some vital wheat gluten,red mill brand,don't know how to use it at what % to add to bread or pizza dough, any suggestions 

  Phil


Offline Frankie G

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Re: vital wheat gluten
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2011, 11:06:30 AM »
vital wheat gluten assists one wants to up the gluten in their current flour - such as All-Purpose.

I want to say the addition of 10% will do... but Pete-zza may have an exact formula.

Offline malvanova

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Re: vital wheat gluten
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2011, 11:31:20 AM »
Thank you Frankie, whats the purpose to upping the gluten???  How will it help if added to all purp. unbleached ceresota flour, for bread, or added to Caputo Pizzeria -Blue Bag- flour.

  Phil
« Last Edit: May 04, 2011, 11:35:39 AM by malvanova »

Offline Frankie G

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Re: vital wheat gluten
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2011, 03:09:58 PM »
hey Phil,

Gluten helps with the structure of your dough... or allows one to stretch without breaking.

All purpose flour is a low protein flour... and protein is needed to develop strong gluten...  at least that's what I understand.... I am sure there is a more technical explanation coming on this thread soon.. ;)

I personally would not add it to Caputo or any 00 flour... the protein in 00 flour is nice and tender.  To change it in my opinion would be a shame... but one never knows unless they try right? ;D

Here's and excerpt I found on the internet:

Vital wheat gluten is like a super-powered flour that is all gluten and very little starch. It's not technically flour itself, but it's made from wheat flour that has been hydrated to activate the gluten and then processed to remove everything but that gluten. It's then dried and ground back into a powder.

Because it's almost pure gluten, a little goes a long way to improving the elasticity and rise of the raw dough and the crumb and chewiness in the final loaves. Most baking sources recommend about one tablespoon for every 2-3 cups of flour.

You can add vital wheat gluten to any bread recipe, but it's especially effective when baking with low-protein flours like whole wheat and rye (which have trouble developing enough gluten) or in recipes with a lot of extra ingredients added in like nuts, dried fruit, or seeds. We add a few tablespoons of vital wheat gluten when a recipe recommends using high-protein bread flour but all we have is regular all-purpose flour, as with bagels and some artisan breads.


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: vital wheat gluten
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2011, 03:54:13 PM »
Phil,

To get a general and broad understanding of vital wheat gluten (VWG) and how it is used, you might want to take a look at the vital wheat gluten entry in the forum's Pizza Glossary at http://www.pizzamaking.com/pizza_glossary.html#V. Most of the members of the forum use VWG in the context of pizza dough but it can also be used to make bread dough, where it helps give more volume. It is also used for the applications that Frankie G mentioned.

The instructions to add a certain percent VWG to a flour or a certain number of teaspoons or tablespoons to a cup of flour are very common instructions. However, those instructions are a one-size-fits-all approach that fails to take into account the protein content of the flour to which the VWG is added or the protein content of the final blend. Understandably, VWG producers do not want to give instructions for every conceivable flour to which their VWG might be added. In my opinion, the far better approach to take is to use the Mixed Mass Conversion Calculator at http://foodsim.unclesalmon.com/. That calculator gives you complete control over all of the numbers and in a way that is far more accurate than following the instructions that producers of VWG give to their customers as to the use of their product.

To use the Mixed Mass Conversion Calculator, you select the base flour that is to be supplemented with VWG, and also the brand of VWG that you plan to use. There are two pull-down menus that contain many common and popular types and brands of flour and VWG. If a particular brand or type of flour or VWG is not in a pull-down menu, you need to know the protein contents of the flour or VWG and then use the substance A field and/or the substance B field, as appropriate. Once you have made these selections, you then decide on the desired weight (target mass) of the final blend of the base flour and the VWG and its desired protein content from a percent standpoint (target percentage). For example, you might want to add VWG to a bread flour, such as the King Arthur bread flour (KABF) with a protein content of 12.7%, to get a final protein content that is the same as a high-gluten flour, such as the King Arthur Sir Lancelot flour (KASL) that has a protein content of 14.2%. The calculator will allocate the target flour weight between the amount of the base flour to use and the amount of the VWG.

There are a few other things I think you should know about VWG. First, just because you add VWG to a particular flour to achieve a protein content of another flour does not yield a product that is the same as the other flour. So, adding VWG to KABF does not give you KASL. Second, not everyone likes the effects produced from using VWG. It is usually a taste thing but it might also be a texture matter. So, you will have to decide for yourself whether you like it or not. Third, if you add a certain amount of VWG to an existing quantity of flour, you may have to adjust the hydration to compensate for the fact that VWG has different absorption characteristics than most flours. Usually, the advice is to increase the amount of water by 1 1/2-2 times the weight of the VWG. Fourth, it is perhaps not a good idea to use VWG to make a protein jump between flours that is too great. Going from all-purpose flour to bread flour or from bread flour to high-gluten flour seems to work pretty well but not going from, say, all-purpose flour to high-gluten flour. Finally, I tend to agree with Frankie G that it perhaps is not the best idea to supplement 00 flour with VWG. It can certainly be done, and I don't like to discourage people from trying things, but I would rather select the proper type or brand of 00 flour with the proper protein content.

I have written extensively on the subject of VWG, so if you would like to read and learn more, you might want to do a forum search using the Google Custom Search feature that you can access at the bottom of the index page of the forum. You might use the keywords "vital wheat gluten" (in quotes) along with my name--Peter--which I use in closing all of my posts. That should take you to my posts where I have discussed VWG.

Peter

buceriasdon

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Re: vital wheat gluten
« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2011, 04:01:22 PM »
Hard whole wheat flour, milled red grain can have protein content up to 16%, where as soft white whole wheat, made from spring wheat is closer to an All Purpose, 9 to 11% protein. My understanding the lack of rise (density) in whole wheat is caused by the milled whole grain acting like little knives which "cut" the gluten strands. When available I do add 1Tbs. gluten to 2Cups all purpose flour, and find it does add to the strength of the dough ball. I think it is worth mentioning that the the gluten content averages out to 80% of the protein content listed on the package. I posted during Peter's excellent explaination and I would only add that using the calculator that he speaks about was the means I arrived at the 1Tbs for MY flour.
Don
« Last Edit: May 04, 2011, 04:09:02 PM by buceriasdon »

Offline malvanova

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Re: vital wheat gluten
« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2011, 10:22:10 AM »
 Thank you very much, great people.


   Phil