Author Topic: dead yeast  (Read 1074 times)

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Offline zenn

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dead yeast
« on: February 11, 2011, 09:57:47 AM »
Think I know the answer to this, but will post it here anyway in case it generates some discussion.
I use the Fleishmans 1/4 oz ADY that comes in the 3pack sleeves. Open one up other day and use 1/2tsp, the fold up the packet and put it back in the fridge. yesterday I make another batch of dough and use some more of the yeast from said packet. After 24hrs in the fridge, the dough has not expanded even a little. I did bloom the yeast in room temp water for 10mins before use, and i did notice a bit of activity. So what went wrong here. Was the simple act of opening a packet of yeast and putting it back in the ice-box enough to kill it.
On a side note: how do you store your yeast with regards to ADY. Could I take a handful of the 1/4oz packs and combine them into a small jar for storage. Will it be effective that way?

 


Offline c0mpl3x

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Re: dead yeast
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2011, 10:33:33 AM »
waaay cheaper to buy the 4oz jar at $6 than buy 3/4oz at 1.50.

or buy a 2lb brick from sams club for cheaper than the 4oz jar   :chef:
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: dead yeast
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2011, 10:45:14 AM »
zenn,

If you don't mind, I'd like to see the recipe you used and all of the steps you took to make and manage the dough, including any temperatures (like water temperature and finished dough temperature) you may have taken in connection with the preparation of the dough. I store my dry yeast in an airtight container in the freezer without problems so it is hard to imagine that the temperature in your refrigerator compartment can kill the yeast.

Also, was there a sudden lowering in outdoor temperature between the time you made the first dough and the subsequent dough?

Peter

Offline zenn

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Re: dead yeast
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2011, 10:58:01 AM »
Flour (100%):    427.82 g  |  15.09 oz | 0.94 lbs
Water (70%):    299.47 g  |  10.56 oz | 0.66 lbs
ADY (.5%):    2.14 g | 0.08 oz | 0 lbs | 0.57 tsp | 0.19 tbsp
Salt (.5%):    2.14 g | 0.08 oz | 0 lbs | 0.38 tsp | 0.13 tbsp
Oil (1%):    4.28 g | 0.15 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.95 tsp | 0.32 tbsp
Total (172%):   735.85 g | 25.96 oz | 1.62 lbs | TF = 0.102

Using KABF, blom yeast in room temp water for 10 mins. Then put all ingrediants in KA for 2 or so mins to intial combine. Let sit for 15mins (assume this is autolyse period) then 10min knead on lowest setting. Ball and into an airtigh container in fridge overnight.
Sorry dont have temps for anything. I'm in the northeast, outdoor temp has been pretty cold but no sudden drops I'm aware of. House is steady 70. 

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: dead yeast
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2011, 11:19:20 AM »
zenn,

If I had to guess, I would say that the problem you experienced was due to either or both of (1) using room temperature water to rehydrate the ADY or (2) a fermentation time that was too short to allow sufficient fermentation of the dough as to be visibly noticeable. The recommended temperature for rehydrating ADY is about 105 degrees F. Being off on either side of that temperature by several degrees F can degrade performance of the ADY. So, if your "room temperature" water was bottled or other water that you allowed to reach room temperature (around 70 degrees F in your case) or water from your tap that was close to room temperature, as it is in my house this time of year, either way that water temperature is far below what is recommended for rehydrating ADY. That doesn't necessarily mean that the dough is dead or unusable, even if the performance of the ADY is degraded. However, it can mean that a far longer period of fermentation is needed to achieve a dough that is usable. In your case, that might mean having to go several days longer with the fermentation. If the outdoor temperature is lower than normal, that can also slow down the fermentation process to the extent that your kitchen is also cooler than normal.

I have no explanation for why your first dough batch worked out differently than your second dough batch, especially if you used the same protocol.

Peter

Offline zenn

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Re: dead yeast
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2011, 11:31:43 AM »
Thanks for the input.
I've been making pizza for years, though it isn't till I found this site that i started taking it seriously, following formulas and using a digital scale. The procedure has always been the same, measure out a glass of tap water, set it out on the counter for about an hour, add yeast and let bloom for 10mins till i see some foamy looking activity. This has always worked for me (summer, winter, whenever). I will admit I used to to use an entire packet 1/4oz of yeast to make dough. Basic recipe was 2parts flour, 1part water. add yeast, pinch of salt, drizzle of olive oil. The pizza came out OK, but never great. Since finding this forum my pies have gotten consistently better, thanks to your posts and all the info I've gleamed.
Maybe it's time to invest in a thermometer. 

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: dead yeast
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2011, 11:48:58 AM »
zenn,

Using a lot of yeast will make up for a multitude of sins, and that perhaps explains why your earlier doughs worked out even if some of the yeast did not perform optimally. Based on the rest periods and the steps you described to make your dough, I would estimate that the finished dough temperature in your case was close to room temperature, even after a 10 minute knead at low speed. I usually strive for a finished dough temperature of between 75-80 degrees F. I agree that having a decent digital readout thermometer is a good idea, even if it is only to get the right water temperature to rehydrate ADY.

Peter

buceriasdon

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Re: dead yeast
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2011, 11:50:15 AM »
zenn, I nuke for 8 seconds in the microwave, yours will vary and stick my finger in the water. If it feels warm, it's good to go.
Don