Author Topic: Steel plate  (Read 59728 times)

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scott123

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #25 on: February 02, 2011, 10:20:25 PM »
The new smooth plate is 0.250 inches thick and the Fakiro plate is 0.251 without the nubbins, right now performance seems to be about equal.  I'm quite interested to hear how the steel plates work in regular ovens since there is a huge plate steel fabrication industry around here and I'm sure I could get a plate cut for my gas convection also and increase my pizza size to 16 inches (the perfect size for a New York style in my opinion.)

I really believe the steel/metal plate is far superior to any stoneware type, don't know about actual stone.  I just don't buy the theory that any kind of stoneware or even brick can absorb moisture after being heated to 500 deg. F.  I believe the secret is thermal mass and infrared radiation that makes the crust crisp.  The water is driven up through the dough steaming it and the toppings and metal delivers both thermal mass and infrared better than earthen materials which are actually insulators, just my tow cents.  I also think cast iron will perform about as well as rolled steel or the aluminum/steel plates but have no experience with it.

Ron, I've talked about it before, but I firmly believe that, at high temperatures/quick bake times, the absorptive ability of the stone is meaningless. Water doesn't stay in the liquid phase long enough to be absorbed into the stone. And that's assuming the stone can absorb much.  The most common pizza stone in the industry is cordierite and that can barely absorb any liquid- at any temperature. As to the 'glassy' surface you're getting, I think this all relates to the smoothness of your plate.  The soapstone I work with has almost zero absorption and I get a very traditionally rough and blistered undercrust with that.

I have to admit that, with a quarter inch plate and convection oven, you're working a little bit outside of the paradigm of this thread. When I talk about steel plate, it's within the context of being thick enough to store all the necessary heat to bake a pizza. A quarter inch of steel won't store that much heat. That being said, you've peaked my curiosity. With the aluminum plate, since aluminum is too conductive to pre-heat (the moment you open the oven door, the temp of the aluminum plummets), you're basically relying completely on the circulating hot air to heat the aluminum as the pizza is baking. The quarter inch steel is probably a combination between the two (some stored heat, some convected heat).  Since Rotoflex ovens combine thin steel along with convection, I would think that your setup probably comes closest to those.

Where are you at with your bake times?


Offline Meatballs

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #26 on: February 03, 2011, 11:27:00 AM »
Scott,

The oven maximum is 500 F.  I heat the plates to 485 F since as the temp delta gets narrow heat transfer slows greatly.  I use a screen for 2 1/2 minutes and finish on the plate for 2 to 2 1/2 minutes longer. I use 0.5% sugar in my usual dough.

I don't think I've described the bottoms I achieve very well.  Let me try again.  My bottoms cook to medium dark brown, kind of splotchy.  The surface is rough but overall its crunchy.  It will steam once the pizza is taken off the cooling rack and placed on a smooth surface.  The crunch is that of a fresh French bread just out of the oven for about 5 minutes but much coarser.  the glass like crunch I'm referring to is like there are small hard plates in the crust that shatter when put to the tooth. Its really nice and I never got anything  like it with a stone,and I've had 4 different ones over the years.  Those are the years of being lost in the wilderness and making bad pizza going back to college (1975).

Ron
« Last Edit: February 03, 2011, 12:38:33 PM by Meatballs »

Offline communist

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #27 on: February 03, 2011, 03:27:08 PM »
Scott, I do not have a IR thermometer for this weekend.  I am planning on getting one.  For the run this weekend, I am using a cheapo oven metal thermometer.  I will upgrade soon.  I will keep accurate time of bake.  I will try for photos.  My wife was on the timer last time, and at 650 on firebrick, the pies took three and a half to four minutes.  The four minute was the favorite.  I sanded some of the sharp edges of the steel, and took off minor rust.  Thinking of my first run at 500.  I have a need for heat.   My plate is A36 steel.  Planning on Saturday!
« Last Edit: February 03, 2011, 03:28:51 PM by communist »

Offline TONY

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #28 on: February 03, 2011, 03:42:47 PM »
I used a 12" x 12" paver tile under my broiler to make Neopilitan pizza.  It worked fine for a couple of bakes but eventually cracked.  I tried using a steel plate, which was 1/4" thick by 12" square.  I put under my broiler the same as the tile.  I was able to get the temperature up to 700 degrees pretty fast.  Unfortunately the dough stuck and the pizza burnt very fast.  I guess the steel does not let the moisture escape fast enough.

Tony

scott123

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #29 on: February 03, 2011, 04:11:16 PM »
Ron, 5 minutes, half of which it's on a screen.  Interesting... That's a pretty respectable time. I guess it's safe to assume that the Cadco, as far as ovens go, is very powerful, right?  I get the feeling that we're looking at a different ball game for convection ovens and metal baking surfaces.  Since convection is very rare in NY pizzerias, when I see convection baked pies, they look a little off to me (a strong propensity for golden, brown, delicious), but there may be ways of using the convection with metal plates that make it act more like a deck.

My journey wandering through the wilderness doesn't go quite so far back (80s), but I can certainly commiserate.  Those were dark dark times  :)

scott123

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #30 on: February 03, 2011, 04:23:33 PM »
Mark, I went back and read your original post, and, although you're new to the forum, you seem to have a pretty advanced grasp of the process.  That being said, since you are 'going where no man has gone before', just to be sure that your recipe is in the right ballpark, could you post it?

Ebay has used IR thermometers with auctions ending about every couple days.  I got mine for $18 shipped, but it took me a few weeks. I recommend bidding $20, waiting to see if you win, and, if you don't, bid $20 for the next one.  Eventually you'll win.

Honestly, you can try 500, but I really think 475 will get you closer to the 4 minute mark.  It might even be 450.  If 450=4 minutes, then 500 could translate to 2 minutes, so watch that bottom carefully.


Offline communist

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #31 on: February 03, 2011, 04:34:15 PM »
Thanks Scott.  Will go with 475 and post recipe tonight.  Mark

buceriasdon

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #32 on: February 03, 2011, 04:47:29 PM »
Tony, I have question for you. Did you season the plate as one would for cast iron using oil to coat the surface then baking it? Thanks, Don
Also, I'm not surprised you had problems at 700.

I used a 12" x 12" paver tile under my broiler to make Neopilitan pizza.  It worked fine for a couple of bakes but eventually cracked.  I tried using a steel plate, which was 1/4" thick by 12" square.  I put under my broiler the same as the tile.  I was able to get the temperature up to 700 degrees pretty fast.  Unfortunately the dough stuck and the pizza burnt very fast.  I guess the steel does not let the moisture escape fast enough.

Tony
« Last Edit: February 03, 2011, 04:51:27 PM by buceriasdon »

Offline TONY

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #33 on: February 03, 2011, 06:04:39 PM »
Buceriasdon,

No, I did not season the plate.........But I did use alot of bench flour as I did when I baked with the tile........

Tony


Offline Meatballs

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #34 on: February 03, 2011, 06:49:03 PM »
Scott,

The oven is a Cadco XAF115, a 220 volt commercial convection oven.  Most all commercial ovens are not appropriate for a household and but this is one of the few.  The MFG link is here:  http://www.cadco-ltd.com/ovens-full.html   I bought the oven for my wife for bread making about 3 or so years ago.  I got her the Fakiro plate for bread some time ago and then found out that it was designed for pizza in a convection oven.  Before I made good pizza, I used a stone.  Recently I decided to give myself a masters degree in pizza and did extensive research on PMQ and Pizza Today and at other commercial sites for convection pizza cooking.

Below in the photo of the oven you can see the two plates I now have. The bottom plate is the Fakiro and the bumps on its bottom are visible.  The top plate is the "Aluminized Steel" plate that costs a fraction of the Fakiro.  Both seem to operate identically, heating times are the same but I have not investigated how good recovery rates compare, but I suspect they are the same.  Both plates are high tech items in either construction or materials.

By the way, the Cadco oven costs less (by 1/3 to 1/2) of a top quality home wall oven.  I'm redoing my kitchen and will be working it into the decor better this year.

I've included two photos of a diet (0.8TF) stuffed pizza I made today at 420 F for 13 minutes.  Eight minutes in the tart pan and 5 minutes on the Fakiro plate with the other plate over.  I cook this pizza slow to allow the center to cook, its a calzone in pizza shape really, the wife loves them and the calories are low.  You gotta get pizza any way you can, know?  Saturday is Pizza day and I can get accurate IR thermometer temps of the plates heating and during and after cooking to try to see heat loss and recoup.

Ron

Offline communist

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #35 on: February 03, 2011, 08:10:08 PM »
Tony, I would imagine seasoning a steel plate at 700 would just result in smoking of the oil.  Scott, here is my dough recipe I just mixed up.    All Trumps Bromated bleached 100%  34 ounces        63% filtered water  21.5 ounces   1.5% salt  0.5 ounces   olive oil  1%  0.32 ounces  IDY 0.2%  0.064 ounces ( I use one teaspoon )  Combine water with salt, mix with flour and yeast with spoon for 30 seconds, KA mixer on speed one for 1 minute, Then speed 2 for another minute, then add oil  and mix for 4 more minutes.  Remove dough ( temp at 85 )  Cut into five equal 11 ounce pieces, and hand knead each piece for about 45 seconds into nice balls.  Grease plastic tupperware containers for individual balls with scant olive oil.  Cover and refrigerate.  Will remove in 2 days from refrigerator and leave at room temp for 2 hours.  Stretch dough to about 8 inches, and allow to rest for approximately 15 minutes.  Then stretch into 14 inch pie.  Add sauce and 5 ounces of Grande whole milk mozzarella.  Slide onto stone. 

Offline communist

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #36 on: February 03, 2011, 10:33:39 PM »
Ron, Nice crust!   Mark

Offline communist

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #37 on: February 05, 2011, 08:47:10 PM »
Pizza community, I experienced a crushing defeat tonight in my trial of half inch steel plate in pizza baking!  The numbers on steel looked great, with excellent heat transfer.  I heated by electric oven to 475 with my steel plate high in the oven, and my firebrick stone low.  I had a good one hour preheat.  My cheapo oven thermomter inside read 480.  I assembled my pie, and slid it onto steel.  I watched for that magic oven spring.  Nuttin.  I watched.  At five minutes my pizza was pale and the bottom just mildly brown.  I slid it to the stone below, and waited another 3 minutes for it to finish.  Taste was good.  Crust very crisp.  But weak oven spring.  And 8 minutes.  No where near a 4 minute bake.  Complete defeat.  Not even close.  Stunned, but not comatose, I cranked my oven up to 550.  And I waited for 20 minutes. I slid my next pie onto the steel.  Some oven spring, decent crust at 5minutes, but not as crispy as the first pie I had to put on the stone. Poor consolation.   I am disheartened.  Anybody want a piece of 40lb steel?  For the man who has everything!  A great gift!   Well, after a good cry and a good night sleep, perhaps I can revisit the challenge.  I need an infrared thermometer - I just don't trust my cheapo metal one. And maybe I can use my steel at 550 for 2 minutes, and then slide it onto my firebrick stone for another 2 or 3 minutes.  Maybe...

scott123

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #38 on: February 05, 2011, 09:20:50 PM »
I was just about to be really bummed out and then I reread your post again (bold mine):

I heated by electric oven to 475 with my steel plate high in the oven, and my firebrick stone low.

Firebrick is a major insulator. It takes forever to pre-heat, sucks up a ton of heat and shields the steel plate above.  Get rid of it.

As to the cheapo thermometer reading 480- it's going to reach 480 before the interior of the steel plate will. The steel plate really needs to be saturated- and you won't get that with firebrick in the way. Btw, would you happen to recall where the thermometer was placed?

It's a little discouraging, but, until you get rid of the firebrick, I'm not giving up hope.

Offline communist

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #39 on: February 05, 2011, 09:41:05 PM »
I won't back down, no I won't back down ( Me and Tom Petty! )  O.K. Scott, I see your point.  I will try again, without the firebrick, and armed with an infrared thermometer.  I did have the cheapo thermometer next to the steel plate, but it was very slow in getting up to 475.  How was my dough mix I posted earlier?  I think there is still hope.  I need a better handle on my oven temps.  I will plan for next weekend.  Thanks for the help.   Mark
« Last Edit: February 05, 2011, 09:46:06 PM by communist »

scott123

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #40 on: February 05, 2011, 09:58:23 PM »
Tell you what... go with 500 and a full hour pre-heat.  It's a little overkill on the time, but I want to be absolutely certain that the stone is 500 all the way through.

And your recipe looks great.   For a cold fermented All Trumps dough, I might dial back on the kneading, but, for the purposes of this testing, it shouldn't matter a great deal. Are you forming the skin in stages because it's fighting you?  If so, less kneading will help in that regard.  Is your dough between 2x and 3x the volume by the time you form the skin?

Also, are you using the broiler while the pizza is baking? The (hopefully) conductive plate will help with bottom induced spring, but you need a good blast of heat from above as well to really maximize upward mobility.  I form/top my skin, turn on the broiler, wait until it turns bright red, and then launch the pie.  I then leave the broiler on for the first two minutes of the bake.  You'll need to adjust the time for the distance your broiler is to your stone.  My vertical space is 6".

Offline communist

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #41 on: February 05, 2011, 10:15:35 PM »
O.K.  I will go for 500 and a good hour pre-heat.  My skin is not really fighting me.  I like to give it a rest so it stretches really easily.  My dough is just under doubled after 48 hr cold ferment and 2 hours at room temp.  Should I boost the yeast?  I will use the broiler as you suggest.  One thing that confuses me after all the dust has settled is that my steel in my oven is still warm, but my firebrick below it is cool, even though the firebrick is thicker.  Hmmm.


scott123

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #42 on: February 05, 2011, 10:29:57 PM »
That is strange. How thick is the firebrick?

Yes, to the yeast boost.  Try a teaspoon and  a quarter. For All Trumps, you really want to shoot for between doubling and tripling. Even more than triple is not the end of the world, if your container can handle it.

Offline communist

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #43 on: February 05, 2011, 11:06:00 PM »
My firebrick is three quarters inch thick.  It is a twenty year old Pizza Gourmet Stone which looks and acts like firebrick.  I will up the yeast a bit.  Thanks Scott.

Offline communist

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #44 on: February 09, 2011, 08:11:32 PM »
Scott, tried the steel plate tonight.  Used same dough, but bumped up yeast to 1 and a quarter teaspoon, and cut machine mix by one minute.  Did a twenty four hour rise instead of 48.  My container is a bit small, and the dough pushed off the top.  Dough doubled after 2 hours out of referigerator.  Gave steel a 90 minute warm up at 550 for overkill.  Cranked up broiler to red hot, and launched pie onto steel.  Great oven spring, cut broiler after one minute ( my electric broiler is wicked, and at 6 inches, I would incinerate pie if I kept it on for 2 full minutes ).  Pulled pie at 3 and a half minutes.  Great color on top and bottom crust.  Bottom crust not that crispy.  Good taste.  So an A for spring, C for crispy crust.  Maybe leave pie in for 4 minutes next time.  Was going to buy infrared thermometer, but the steel has some reflectiveness to it, and I read where the IR thermomter may give false readings.  Still interested in steel plate, but ambivalent.  Will continue to experiment.

buceriasdon

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #45 on: February 09, 2011, 09:58:22 PM »
Communist, Reflection off the the plate is immaterial, doesn't matter.
Don

scott123

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #46 on: February 09, 2011, 10:32:54 PM »
Mark, what bake times were you getting with the Gourmet stone @ 650?

The good news is that I think you've got a viable untweaked oven capable stone there.  You'll get crispiness from a longer bake, ie, a slightly lower temp. You can also try dialing back the hydration a bit and increasing the oil (try 2%).  The downside to a longer bake is less oven spring.  That's the price you pay for crispy, though.

I find it helps to let the pizza cool on a wire rack- that way the bottom doesn't get so soggy.

The bad news is that 3.5 minutes @ 550 is not so good for people looking for a material that will give them 4 minutes @ 475.  Not good at all.  Quite sucky, actually  ;D Could you get your hands on an IR thermometer?  And how about a photo?

Offline communist

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #47 on: February 10, 2011, 09:20:28 AM »
Scott/Don Thanks for the advice.  At 650 with the stone, I was getting a approx 3.5 minutes bake with good oven spring and some char on bottom crust.  I'm not sure about crisp factor.  I may repeat these with the tweaked dough and see what happens,with careful documentation along the way, including photos.  Then I will compare that to the steel plate at 550.  I had a nice gallery of photos but was unable to add them.  It said I have too much data?  Who should I contact concerning this?  I have an apple computer.  I cool on a wire rack.  I will get an IR thermometer.  Thanks for all your help!  Mark

buceriasdon

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #48 on: February 10, 2011, 09:26:49 AM »
Mark, The easiest method to post pictures is to set your camera to take smaller pics. Problem solved.
Don


Scott/Don Thanks for the advice.  At 650 with the stone, I was getting a approx 3.5 minutes bake with good oven spring and some char on bottom crust.  I'm not sure about crisp factor.  I may repeat these with the tweaked dough and see what happens,with careful documentation along the way, including photos.  Then I will compare that to the steel plate at 550.  I had a nice gallery of photos but was unable to add them.  It said I have too much data?  Who should I contact concerning this?  I have an apple computer.  I cool on a wire rack.  I will get an IR thermometer.  Thanks for all your help!  Mark

Offline communist

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #49 on: February 10, 2011, 09:31:36 AM »
Will try that Don.  Thanks  Mark


 

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