Author Topic: Steel plate  (Read 74124 times)

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scott123

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #250 on: September 12, 2013, 09:26:50 AM »
Mary Ann, it's important to keep in mind that kneading and handling dictate gluten development, so a 14% protein flour can make the identical dough that a 13% flour can, depending on how you treat it.  In fact, there's a lot of overlap.  The only difference is that a 14% protein flour gives you the ability to develop a bit more gluten and produce something really chewy, like a bagel.

Because this extra chewy potential isn't there with 13% flour, you don't have to spend a lot of time worrying about overworking the dough/overdeveloping the gluten.  With 14%, you really have to hit that cottage cheese appearance or your texture will suffer. With 13% flour, if you miss the mark, it's no big deal.

I haven't made Sicilian with lower protein flour, but Norma has made some of the best Detroit Sicilian pies this forum (the world?) has ever seen with Occident flour at 12.4% protein. 

Other than bagels, where you really need that chewiness, 14% protein flour serves almost no purpose for bread. Trust me, the Best Bakers will give you some of the best bread and pizza that you've ever baked.

Offline mbrulato

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #251 on: September 15, 2013, 03:06:53 PM »
Great.  I look forward to it.  Then the Best Bakers is a two-fer.  It will replace what I have been using for NY style as well as what I use for bread (KABF).  Is it ok to use a steam bath underneath my steel plates for the next time I make bread? 
Mary Ann

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scott123

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #252 on: September 16, 2013, 04:19:01 AM »
Mary Ann, your back isn't going to like hearing this  ;D but the steel plates won't work for bread. If you're baking bread, you'll need to switch back to your old stone.

Offline mbrulato

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #253 on: September 16, 2013, 08:44:49 AM »
Ha ha!  That's where my handy double oven comes in  :P. I'll just use the other one.

Why won't it work for bread?
Mary Ann

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scott123

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #254 on: September 16, 2013, 09:08:18 AM »
The advantages of a double oven  ;D

Steel's fast rate of heat transfer is perfect for pizza, but it's too fast for slower baked bread and will burn the bottom before the top is done.

Offline greg c

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #255 on: October 08, 2013, 02:25:58 AM »
Steel plate can deliver on near neapolitan pies in a no-frills home electric oven. I don't know about 1/4 inch plate, but I have 3/8 inch and have badly burned many pies in under 30 seconds; that is, when the plate is 750F or so at launch. I don't bypass the self-clean, since there is none, I simply isolate the thermometer in the oven by placing aluminum foil around it and around the edges of my slab (covering from the perimeter of the slab to the wall of the oven on all 3 sides), thus making a small oven from the top shelf of the oven to the oven ceiling. The idea is that the broiler never cycles off so the slab gets up to 800 and the air temp has topped 1000. I forget which thread, but I got these ideas from someone here at pizzamaking. Anyways, these are self-cleaning cycle temps and probably not great for oven longevity; which I would have gladly risked if the pies were coming out great (some did, but I needed greater consistency).

I'm happier with the steel not on the highest, but second-highest rack. Bottoms cook more nicely when steel temp is around 650F--around 60 seconds. After 60 seconds, about 30 to 60 seconds of doming is needed, (too much time IMO, but wacha gonna do?) so I'm still trying to get the best balance, but at least I'm not as worried about harming oven.

My assumption is that armed with an infrared thermometer one can get good, consistent near-neapolitan results.


Offline hockman4357

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #256 on: October 12, 2013, 06:51:04 PM »
So, if I want the best flour for steel plate baked New York style pizza, am I specifically looking for Best Bakers Spring King flour?  Is that the exact name?  I live in Oregon, and I'm wondering where I can find this flour.

Offline bbqchuck

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #257 on: October 16, 2013, 08:49:15 PM »
I think I saw somewhere on TV where drinking beer makes beautiful women hang around you and laugh at all your jokes and look at you with admiration.  Now that's MARKETING! :-D   I think the mark up on beer might be a wee bit more % than Baking Steel.   ::)


I'm just sayin ...

Offline mbrulato

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #258 on: October 16, 2013, 09:34:13 PM »
So, if I want the best flour for steel plate baked New York style pizza, am I specifically looking for Best Bakers Spring King flour?  Is that the exact name?  I live in Oregon, and I'm wondering where I can find this flour.

They are two different flours.  I have never used Spring King Flour but you might follow this link for Spring King Distibutors in your area, if any.   http://www.progressivebaker.com/distributors/index.html

I bought Pillsbury Best Bakers Flour from a local wholesale distributor here in NJ.  I have been using it for about a month now to make NY Style pizzas and ciabatta bread with great results.  http://www.professionalbakingsolutions.com/product/best-bakers-patent-flour-bleached-bromated-enriched-malted-50-lb/133054000?mct=Flour&ct=pizza&typ=Category. It looks like this may only be available on the east coast but you might call Pillsbury to find out an equivalent that they can recommend that is available in your area.

Mary Ann
Mary Ann

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Offline Minolta Rokkor

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #259 on: March 03, 2016, 04:06:55 PM »
My pleasure Scott.

For the 70 second pie the steel was on the top rack, less than 3" from the broiler.  I did not use convection for that bake just Maxi-broil.  (Convection was against the proscribed rules!)

In general I use a convection broil setting to cook which combines air circulation with top heat.

I favor a 3-4 minute bake for textural reasons.

I would interested to see your take on cooking on the steel.  I think the way the dough behaves on such an efficient surface might suprise you.  there is  a point at which a cooking surface is not efficiednt enough and a point at which it becomes too efficient.  I think steel probably crosses this second line.  There was no way of knowing this prospectively without experiments.  I can tell you there is a wierd floppiness to steel cooked pies.

There's a reason most ovens have a porous stone like floor or deck I guess.

I'm going to try this out, how do I get the steel closer to the broiler?

Offline toddster63

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #260 on: March 03, 2016, 05:34:47 PM »
My seasoned steel plate (purchased commercially from Sur La Table) has revolutionized my home pizza making. The Little Black Egg is retired. Family and friends say my crusts--made with King Arthur Bread flour at 60% water--are the best ever; crispy, crispy, with a nice soft interior and decent spring. Dough is made with very little commercial yeast (and no oil or sugar as this makes the crust brown/burn too quickly on the steel), and then cold fermented for up to a week at 38F in the fridge. The pizzas are baked for 5-8 minutes at 550F, after the plate heats up for 1 hour; the pies come out very Apizza Scholls, or Patsy's Connecticut. I also love that the steel only needs 5 minutes reheat time between pies--it holds heat marvelously and makes consistent pie after pie (consistency was very hit and miss with any method involving stones in my past, with the exception of wood fire ovens). No stone I have used has even come close to this level of consistency--I think the seasoned steel surface is a big taste plus as well.

If you like crispy east coast style pies, and are willing to work on your dough expertise, I cannot recommend the steel plates highly enough for superlative pies at home (but just remember making and working with the dough has a learning curve!)

Offline k2yeb

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #261 on: March 10, 2016, 12:43:07 PM »
For anyone that bought a steel plate from Baking Steel did you also buy a case? I know steel is sturdy but these are heavy and I don't want to heavily scratch mine. Got the modernist cuisine one.

FYI they raised prices $20 so lucky I bought mine last week. Yes I know you can get one locally but I live in the country so not as easy. Thanks for your time.


Offline jsaras

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #262 on: March 10, 2016, 07:33:46 PM »
They have a case for it?  LOL.  Do they also have goat hide leather straps as well?
Things have never been more like today than they are right now.

Offline k2yeb

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #263 on: March 11, 2016, 08:37:56 AM »
Hardy har. I 100% agree the product is overpriced. It should be $25-30 cheaper at a minimum. I am just over an hour from any decent size city and thus its the easiest option for me.  Gas would cost me any savings I would get. Not to mention time. 

From my experience these things are pretty heavy. Carrying it around and storing it isn't as easy as a stone in my experience. Where do people store their steels? I don't want to just slide it in my pan shelf...so just trying to be smart. I'm knew so ignore any ignorant questions.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2016, 08:45:41 AM by k2yeb »

Offline norcoscia

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #264 on: March 11, 2016, 10:22:34 AM »
I leave mine (and my stone) in the oven - every once in a while I'll take out the steels and give them wipe with some oil and or scrap any carbon as necessary.
Norm

Offline k2yeb

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #265 on: March 11, 2016, 10:24:54 AM »
Thanks, the weight of a steel is unfortunately near my rack max for weight. I have seem some modifications here posted and I might try that. I bought an electrolux icon oven with our kitchen remodel and never thought about rack weight (nor is it listed in manual). Stupid thing maxes out around 25 lbs so I probably can't do that.

Thanks for everyone's time.

Offline andyt

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #266 on: March 11, 2016, 01:12:44 PM »
Can anyone offer an opinion on Dough-Joe 1/2" Pizza Steel from Amazon?

http://www.amazon.com/Dough-Joe%C2%AE-Baking-Sheet---Emperor-trade/dp/B00LBKWSGW/?tag=pmak-20

Thanks
andyt

Offline k2yeb

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #267 on: March 11, 2016, 02:19:21 PM »
I have used both (dough joe, baking steel) and they both work exactly the same from my 6 months of experience.

Offline Steve

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #268 on: March 11, 2016, 04:31:01 PM »
I have an aluminum plate... it's about 1/4" thick and is perforated (a vendor sent it to me to try). I've never had much success with it. Top rack, bottom rack, it bakes no better than my stone. I've tried it on the top rack under the broiler with not-so-good results (IR thermometer had it at 700+ degrees F. as soon as I opened the door with the broler running, but it quickly dropped to 600 degrees F. after a few seconds). I don't think aluminum is the right metal for this application as it quickly loses its heat. I'd be anxious to try a 1/2" STEEL plate under the broiler.  :)

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #269 on: March 11, 2016, 05:05:00 PM »
Inch for inch, aluminium holds a lot less heat than steel. It has a higher heat capacity per kg, but is significantly less dense. 1/4 aluminium simply can't hold enough heat.
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Offline caymus

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #270 on: March 11, 2016, 07:59:13 PM »
I have been playing around with a 3/4" AL plate and I can't get results that are as good as my 1/2" carbon steel. Of course my Blackstone is superior to both.

Offline Minolta Rokkor

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #271 on: March 11, 2016, 10:51:34 PM »
Can anyone offer an opinion on Dough-Joe 1/2" Pizza Steel from Amazon?

http://www.amazon.com/Dough-Joe%C2%AE-Baking-Sheet---Emperor-trade/dp/B00LBKWSGW/?tag=pmak-20

Thanks
andyt
OVER PRICED.

I can get steel that is 1" longer in Width and Length, while costing less than half the price of what i being offered on amazon.

Boy if you don't look for a local steel fabricator in Ontario, I swear to god.

https://www.google.com/maps/search/steel+fabricators+near+Ontario,+Canada/@48.2194728,-93.7265,5z/data=!3m1!4b1

C'MON!!!!

Offline andyt

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #272 on: March 14, 2016, 11:31:32 AM »
Minolta

Thanks for the heads up and the great map.  You are far more than right with OVER PRICED.  The Dough-Joe would cost me $US100 and I would have to ship it to friends in Hartford, Dough-Joe does not ship to Canada.  It would arrive here in a month or two, always somebody coming and going here and there.

Then the fact is $US100 is $C135, so end of Dough-Joe. 

I have found Scott 123's Steel Plate Buying Guide and mburlato's Steel Plate story, very helpful.

Many Thanks
andyt

Offline k2yeb

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #273 on: March 15, 2016, 11:30:31 AM »
What type of Flax Seed oil (or if you use a different product love to know that too) do people use to season steel? Lignan or Fresh?

http://www.amazon.com/Barleans-Organic-Oils-16-Ounce-Bottle/dp/B002VLZ830/?tag=pmak-20

http://www.amazon.com/Barleans-Organic-Oils-Lignan-16-Ounce/dp/B002VLZ81M/?tag=pmak-20

Seems people have used both.

Offline norcoscia

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #274 on: March 15, 2016, 11:40:25 AM »
I have read long very "scientific" explanations about using Flax Seed oil to achieve the best coating when seasoning a cast iron pan.

I don't really know if it is worth it. For my pizza steels, I just use any old oil (like soybean) that I have in the cabinet - I'm just trying to keep it from rusting.

I don't even put it on between each use, just when it looks like it may need a re-coat. I put a very small amount on a paper towel and rub it in a thin as I can get it - seems to work just fine for me.
Norm