Author Topic: Steel plate  (Read 62953 times)

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scott123

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #250 on: September 12, 2013, 09:26:50 AM »
Mary Ann, it's important to keep in mind that kneading and handling dictate gluten development, so a 14% protein flour can make the identical dough that a 13% flour can, depending on how you treat it.  In fact, there's a lot of overlap.  The only difference is that a 14% protein flour gives you the ability to develop a bit more gluten and produce something really chewy, like a bagel.

Because this extra chewy potential isn't there with 13% flour, you don't have to spend a lot of time worrying about overworking the dough/overdeveloping the gluten.  With 14%, you really have to hit that cottage cheese appearance or your texture will suffer. With 13% flour, if you miss the mark, it's no big deal.

I haven't made Sicilian with lower protein flour, but Norma has made some of the best Detroit Sicilian pies this forum (the world?) has ever seen with Occident flour at 12.4% protein. 

Other than bagels, where you really need that chewiness, 14% protein flour serves almost no purpose for bread. Trust me, the Best Bakers will give you some of the best bread and pizza that you've ever baked.


Offline mbrulato

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #251 on: September 15, 2013, 03:06:53 PM »
Great.  I look forward to it.  Then the Best Bakers is a two-fer.  It will replace what I have been using for NY style as well as what I use for bread (KABF).  Is it ok to use a steam bath underneath my steel plates for the next time I make bread? 
Mary Ann

scott123

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #252 on: September 16, 2013, 04:19:01 AM »
Mary Ann, your back isn't going to like hearing this  ;D but the steel plates won't work for bread. If you're baking bread, you'll need to switch back to your old stone.

Offline mbrulato

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #253 on: September 16, 2013, 08:44:49 AM »
Ha ha!  That's where my handy double oven comes in  :P. I'll just use the other one.

Why won't it work for bread?
Mary Ann

scott123

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #254 on: September 16, 2013, 09:08:18 AM »
The advantages of a double oven  ;D

Steel's fast rate of heat transfer is perfect for pizza, but it's too fast for slower baked bread and will burn the bottom before the top is done.

Offline greg c

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #255 on: October 08, 2013, 02:25:58 AM »
Steel plate can deliver on near neapolitan pies in a no-frills home electric oven. I don't know about 1/4 inch plate, but I have 3/8 inch and have badly burned many pies in under 30 seconds; that is, when the plate is 750F or so at launch. I don't bypass the self-clean, since there is none, I simply isolate the thermometer in the oven by placing aluminum foil around it and around the edges of my slab (covering from the perimeter of the slab to the wall of the oven on all 3 sides), thus making a small oven from the top shelf of the oven to the oven ceiling. The idea is that the broiler never cycles off so the slab gets up to 800 and the air temp has topped 1000. I forget which thread, but I got these ideas from someone here at pizzamaking. Anyways, these are self-cleaning cycle temps and probably not great for oven longevity; which I would have gladly risked if the pies were coming out great (some did, but I needed greater consistency).

I'm happier with the steel not on the highest, but second-highest rack. Bottoms cook more nicely when steel temp is around 650F--around 60 seconds. After 60 seconds, about 30 to 60 seconds of doming is needed, (too much time IMO, but wacha gonna do?) so I'm still trying to get the best balance, but at least I'm not as worried about harming oven.

My assumption is that armed with an infrared thermometer one can get good, consistent near-neapolitan results.


Offline hockman4357

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #256 on: October 12, 2013, 06:51:04 PM »
So, if I want the best flour for steel plate baked New York style pizza, am I specifically looking for Best Bakers Spring King flour?  Is that the exact name?  I live in Oregon, and I'm wondering where I can find this flour.

Offline bbqchuck

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #257 on: October 16, 2013, 08:49:15 PM »
I think I saw somewhere on TV where drinking beer makes beautiful women hang around you and laugh at all your jokes and look at you with admiration.  Now that's MARKETING! :-D   I think the mark up on beer might be a wee bit more % than Baking Steel.   ::)


I'm just sayin ...

Offline mbrulato

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Re: Steel plate
« Reply #258 on: October 16, 2013, 09:34:13 PM »
So, if I want the best flour for steel plate baked New York style pizza, am I specifically looking for Best Bakers Spring King flour?  Is that the exact name?  I live in Oregon, and I'm wondering where I can find this flour.

They are two different flours.  I have never used Spring King Flour but you might follow this link for Spring King Distibutors in your area, if any.   http://www.progressivebaker.com/distributors/index.html

I bought Pillsbury Best Bakers Flour from a local wholesale distributor here in NJ.  I have been using it for about a month now to make NY Style pizzas and ciabatta bread with great results.  http://www.professionalbakingsolutions.com/product/best-bakers-patent-flour-bleached-bromated-enriched-malted-50-lb/133054000?mct=Flour&ct=pizza&typ=Category. It looks like this may only be available on the east coast but you might call Pillsbury to find out an equivalent that they can recommend that is available in your area.

Mary Ann
Mary Ann


 

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