Author Topic: Re-Engineering A16 pizza in SF  (Read 145883 times)

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Offline fazzari

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Re: Re-Engineering A16 pizza in SF
« Reply #360 on: September 18, 2008, 01:26:35 PM »
Thanks for the information gentlemen....as I said above, it was the mix time as described in the recipe, that originally caught my eye.  When I mixed my dough I didn't follow time per se, but looked for results..  it didn't take the original 10 minute mix to pull the dough from the sides, it only took about 5 minutes.  After this the recipe calls for a 5 minute rest, which I did...it then calls for a 10 minute mix to make an even softer smoother dough.  So, I set the KA to mix and watched,...after about 5 or 6 minutes there was a noticable change in the dough..it was a very definate change...it was there that I stopped.  The folds on the next two days were something I've never experienced..it was really a different textured dough.  This was 100% Caputo cooked in a 2 stone at about 750 degrees......I'm sold..it was excellent

John


Offline andreguidon

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Re: Re-Engineering A16 pizza in SF
« Reply #361 on: September 18, 2008, 01:56:36 PM »
Thanks Mike !

the Pie looks great John !
"Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication." Leonardo da Vinci

Offline Essen1

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Re: Re-Engineering A16 pizza in SF
« Reply #362 on: September 23, 2008, 10:23:42 PM »
I gave it another shot last night at the A16 pizza and used a dough that was made in about six hours.

I didn't expect the flavor to be great but it was decent. I lowered the hydration to 62%, didn't use the old-dough method, no starter etc, and stuck to the basics, if you will.

They were decent pizzas and the crust was light but had a nice crunch to it.

Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

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Offline VarunS

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Re: Re-Engineering A16 pizza in SF
« Reply #363 on: April 19, 2011, 05:04:46 AM »
Hey Guys,

I tried the recipe given in the A 16 book with only the volume measurements. However I kneaded it by hand since I don't have a stand mixer. Kneaded for totally 20 mins. Used 00 flour for the dough.

Since I don't have an oven that gets really hot to cook the pizza in under 2 mins I used one of these kinds http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Pizza-Maker-/290556773614?pt=UK_HGKitchen_SmallApp_RL&hash=item43a68884ee

I rolled it quite thin and made a 10" pie from about 200grams of dough.  It took about 4:30 - 5:00 mins to cook the pizza. The pizza was very good no doubt but I would like to know what a true Neapolitan should be like. This was crisp and slightly chewy. The edges were also crispy. What would the difference be texture wise if it cooked in under 2 mins as in WFO or the broiler method. Would the edges be softer? I didn't see the large air pockets as I have in some of the pics, this I understand due to not having a super super hot oven. Also the nice dark brown spots were not there, more a light shade of brown.

Also is it necessary to create a small wall around while rolling the dough (referring to the sides where no sauce is applied)?

Thanks for answering my silly questions :)

Cheers

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Re-Engineering A16 pizza in SF
« Reply #364 on: April 19, 2011, 09:31:17 AM »
I rolled it quite thin and made a 10" pie from about 200grams of dough.


Try stretching out your dough ball by hand next time. Press it down with your fingers leaving a rim around the outside. Then, strech it with your hands and over your knuckles. I think they have pictures of this in the A16 cookbook if I remember correctly. If not, there are lots of videos on youtube. I've seen many links on this forum.

Quote
It took about 4:30 - 5:00 mins to cook the pizza. The pizza was very good no doubt but I would like to know what a true Neapolitan should be like. This was crisp and slightly chewy. The edges were also crispy. What would the difference be texture wise if it cooked in under 2 mins as in WFO or the broiler method. Would the edges be softer? I didn't see the large air pockets as I have in some of the pics, this I understand due to not having a super super hot oven. Also the nice dark brown spots were not there, more a light shade of brown.

You might read through some of the threads in the Pizzeria & restaurant Reviews sections. I posted one for A16 a while back also Tony's in North Beach which was one of my favorite pies. There are lots of other good reviews of Neapolitan places. Digesting those should give you some idea of what to expect from a Neapolitan pie.

A lot of the oven spring and brown spots you are looking for come directly from the high heat that is difficult to achieve in a  home oven. Scott123 has written a number of posts on how to maximize your pies out of a home oven. You can use the advanced search feature to find them. Not rolling out your dough will also help get you the large air pockets. So will longer fermentation time.

CL
Pizza is not bread.

Offline VarunS

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Re: Re-Engineering A16 pizza in SF
« Reply #365 on: April 20, 2011, 01:58:56 AM »
Thanks Craig, will try out your suggestions

Offline ox4@verizon.net

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Re: Re-Engineering A16 pizza in SF
« Reply #366 on: May 22, 2012, 08:16:34 PM »
Home pizza cooker here using std 500 deg oven.  Thanks for this thread. 

I tried the A16 from home using existing tools and ingredients with the exception that I found some ADY and used that instead of IDY.  I have concluded I don't like the flavor of the IDY--maybe even results.

Followed Pete's textbook conversions and weighed all in grams.  Used GMBF, Fleishman's ADY, tap water, EVOO, Morton's regular table salt, mixed using food processor with plastic dough blade but not at directed a16 times.  Stopped processor as dough changed states.  Put in refrig 24 hrs, refolded refrig another 24 hrs, divided into fours, rested for 2 hrs (dough was very soft), nicely formed into rounds (no stretch back), then cooked in 500 deg oven with pizza stone. 

Results---excellent bite and flavor.  Color was more white despite painting out edge with EVOO--looking at pics in this thread from John---I think and noticed his finished crust was white except where charred.  So, I think the color achieved is okay---I just need a hotter oven.  Anyways loved the taste and the bite. 

Next time I am going to try the 00 flour.  Thanks for all your help.

Dave 




Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Re-Engineering A16 pizza in SF
« Reply #367 on: May 22, 2012, 10:43:35 PM »
The 00 will have even less color when baked at 500F. You might get better results with AP flour.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline ox4@verizon.net

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Re: Re-Engineering A16 pizza in SF
« Reply #368 on: May 23, 2012, 06:38:11 PM »
okay will try that next.  i have some kaap at 4%.  Thanks.


 

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