Author Topic: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft  (Read 1798 times)

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Offline PizzaManic

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Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« on: October 20, 2015, 11:09:41 AM »
Hi Pizza Family

A family member and I decided to try out this new joint where people have been raving about their Pizza's. I was skeptical when they told me it's super thin and just the right crisp factor to it - I call it tender. Obviously, when I got there, the first thing I did was pop my head over the counter to watch the guys prepping the pies. I noticed that the stretched out skin was already par baked so that already gave away a big clue.

We ordered our toppings and waited patiently for about half an hour before we were presented with our 2 pies. I grabbed the first slice while it was very hot as I'm very impatient when it comes to hot food. Anyways, the first bite presented itself with this excellent texture for a crust - the lightest crisp I can describe and absolutely tender - not the kind that would cause you to loose a tooth (Many of my attempts with Cracker Style almost did that  :'( ).
The next bite I took presented a completely different texture - a more soft texture with almost no crisp and soon I realized that's how the pizza was - each bite presented either a light crisp (Super Tender) or a slightly chewy texture with so little crisp it hardly noticeable. I wasn't sure whether this was a good thing or a bad thing until my family expressed how good the pizza was and up till today - we still rave about it.

I know it's really difficult to make suggestions based upon descriptions without actually tasting the product or even seeing photos of it - I was reminded half way through our Pizza to grab some photos but I didn't care to take any crumb shots so the attached photo is the best I could find in my Gallery.

I eagerly await some guidance on where to make a start with cloning such a recipe.

Take Care
Mo
Regards Mo


Offline fazzari

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2015, 12:18:36 PM »
Mo
Here is what I would do.  Mix up a low hydration dough.....maybe about 48%.  Develop  the dough the best you can with either a mixer or a stretch and fold method, but get the dough strong...I wouldn't want it the least bit crumbly, I want a dough.  After mix, let the dough ferment in a warm place until it almost doubles  (1 - 2 hours).  Then take your rolling pin and sheet out the dough as thin as you want it.  Cut your dough into whatever size and shape pieces you want.  Stack between parchment or wax paper, put in freezer for maybe an hour and then place in the fridge until your ready to use ( should be ready to go in 24 hours).  You could experiment with the prebaking of the skins....I'd definitely try without prebaking also......Use the skins right out of the fridge, don't let them rise before baking.  I'm guessing this will give you a good beginning to getting the skins you want.

John

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2015, 06:15:11 AM »
Thanks Fazzari - you are the Cracker Guru  ;D

Would you mind recommended one of your posts that closest describes the method mentioned?

Regards Mo

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2015, 07:56:25 AM »
Just came across this thread and I guess this is the closes formula to your suggestion in your last post
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=30434.msg322842#msg322842

Just want to know what flour did you use - protein content %?

Thanks
Regards Mo

Offline fazzari

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2015, 08:20:16 AM »
Mo
Just about any flour will work for this, but I usually use a bread flour or a high gluten flour.  King Arthur bread flour and All Trumps is what I've used the most probably 12 to 14%, but this isn't critical.  If you happen to try this method, remember your only going to sheet the dough once, and since the dough is nice and warm and pillowy, it will be very simple to do.
John

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2015, 09:52:19 AM »
Thanks John - I'll be sure to give this a try.

If I roll this on parchment or wax paper - do I bake it directly on that as well?
I also have a Stone - shall I bake directly on that?

Thanks
Regards Mo

Offline fazzari

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2015, 11:34:38 AM »
After it sits in the fridge for about 24 hours, dress it and bake it directly on your stone at about 550 degrees if you can.  Best wishes Mo

John

Offline fazzari

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #7 on: October 25, 2015, 10:35:17 PM »
Mo
I've experimented with this exercise using my tools at work.  I thought I'd give it a try at home and see if I'm correct about the results.
I mixed up a 30 ounce batch of dough using the following recipe
flour           100
hot water    40
sugar           2
salt               2.5
oil                 2.0
yeast              .75

I used 40%hydration just to show that it can be done (I wouldn't recommend it, you don't need to be this low).  Poured all ingredients in Kitchen Aid and mixed for 1 minute using the paddle, mixed just enough to bring the dough basically together.  Poured the crumbly mess on to a cookie sheet and pressed it all together to make a 1 piece dough.  Covered in a plastic bag and placed in a slightly warm oven.  Did a series of stretch and folds with 30 minute rests in the warm oven.  At the end, the dough was a pillowy soft mass.  Sheeted the dough and split it up to manage the sheeting of the dough.  Sheeted to just over the height of a quarter.  Cut sheets into smaller pieces, stacked, and placed in freezer for 30 minutes before placing in the fridge.
The first pizza was baked 24 hours after refrigerating.  Not a great skin, but fair....I think I sheeted a little too thin.  Not a great bottom

John

Offline fazzari

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #8 on: October 25, 2015, 10:37:23 PM »
Here's a dough I baked 72 hours after mix.  This one is an allstar in every way.  Baked in a 550 degree deck oven
John



Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #9 on: October 26, 2015, 03:42:15 AM »
Hi John

Thank you for taking the time to post your results.
When you say the skin wasn't great - what it too crispy since you mentioned it was sheeted too thin?

I'm hopefully going to give this a try in a week or so - definitely going to post my results.

Take Care
Mo

Regards Mo

Offline fazzari

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #10 on: October 27, 2015, 10:56:23 PM »
Hi John

Thank you for taking the time to post your results.
When you say the skin wasn't great - what it too crispy since you mentioned it was sheeted too thin?

I'm hopefully going to give this a try in a week or so - definitely going to post my results.

Take Care
Mo

No Mo
The pizza was crispy, but tough.  The second one (with the nice brown crust was crispy and tender)
john

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #11 on: November 02, 2015, 09:36:32 AM »
Hi John

I'm going to try the formula and method you described here http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=30434.msg322842#msg322842 sometime this week. You mention to use very hot tap water - I was just wondering whether that could adversely affect the yeast activity and possibly cause the yeast to die - should i take any precautions when adding the water?

Thanks
Regards Mo

Offline fazzari

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #12 on: November 03, 2015, 09:24:24 AM »
Just trying to get a jump start on getting a warm dough Mo.  Mix the hot water and flour together and then add yeast, you'll be fine as the dough mixture won't be 'that' warm to harm the yeast
John

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #13 on: November 12, 2015, 04:39:11 AM »
Hey Pizza Pals

Yesterday, I decided to give Fazzari's formula a go - I use the method supplied here http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=30434.msg322842#msg322842

1. The water I used was boiled and then left for about 10 minutes before I added Salt & Sugar and dissolved.
2. Add flour to my water mixture till dough was scrappy and did not really pull together yet.
3. Now added oil and allowed dough hook to knead for about a minute or so.
4. Removed dough from bowl and hand shaped just so dough came together in a scrappy looking ball.
5. Place in a plastic bag and into my very warm oven.
6. After 15 minutes, dough was removed and stretched then folder - I found the gluten wasn't nicely developed since the dough kept tearing here and there.
7. After another 15 mins, I removed from oven again and stretched then folded but I just felt the dough wasn't looking neat so I balled up the dough folding itself inwards till I was satisfied it was little neater looking then placed back into the oven.
8. Remove about 45 mins later and found dough had grown to almost double and was extremely warm. I did another stretch and fold then place back into oven for about 20 minutes.
9. When removed from the oven at this stage, dough was soft and supple with bits of dry spots here and there. I divided dough equally and began to roll out the first skin. I found the skin snapping back very quickly - quite a bit more elasticity than extensibility - it took a bit of effort to roll out but I managed to roll it nice and thin - about 3mm thick at the edge. Same story with the 2nd skin.
10. I then placed the first skin over the 2nd and folder into quarter - see pic attached of the folded dough.
11. I then rolled out the laminated skins to +- 16" - the edge of the skin was approx 6mm thick
12. I placed a 12" pan over the skin and cut out the final skin - the left overs I just balled it up and left it in the fridge (Any suggestions what I could make with this?)
13. I placed some plastic wrap at the bottom of my pan and placed the skin directly on this - stretched it using my hands to overlap the side of my pan and then put into the freezer for about 30 minutes before I fridged it. I'm ready to use it later tonight.
14. I should note that the skin was pretty dry, I could very easily handle it with my hands without fear of it sticking. In fact, when the first skin was rolled, I just placed it one side whilst working with the 2nd one - it didn't stick to anything and almost had a leathery effect - I just hope that won't negatively affect the final product.

Will post further pics tomorrow after the bake.

Take care
Mo
« Last Edit: November 12, 2015, 04:42:39 AM by PizzaManic »
Regards Mo

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #14 on: November 13, 2015, 07:06:57 AM »
Hello All

Here are the results of last nights bake.

1. Oven was preheated to 230C with my stone on the lowest rack for 1hour.
2. Pizza was removed from fridge, topped and loaded directly on the Stone
3. It was baked on the stone for 3 mins before I checked the bottom and found that it was bordering on being burned - I quickly slipped my pizza screen underneath and then move the location to the middle rack that has no stone on it.
4. It was baked here for another 3 minutes - cheese was bubbling nicely.
5. It was remove and left for about 5 minutes to cool before we sliced it

My thoughts
The Pizza was exceptional. The crust was super crispy - flavor was good as well. Family really enjoyed it. One thing I would change in future is to make the crust a tad bit thinner and also try out this recipe with no lamination just to see the difference. I also would like to make the crust a tad bit more tender. If I were to put Crust Tenderness on a scale of 1 to 10 with 1 being extremely tender (Almost no crisp at all) and 3 being the tenderness of a Potato Crisp (Brands such as Lays  :drool:) and 10 being that of a Hard and Crispy toffee sweet (The kind that can break a tooth  :o ) - I place this pizza at 5.5 - I'd like to get it to a 4 if that makes any sense at all - sorry for the confusing analogy - this is the best way I could explain it.

Any suggestions on how to get a more tender crisp?

Thanks and enjoy the pics
Mo
« Last Edit: November 13, 2015, 07:11:22 AM by PizzaManic »
Regards Mo

Offline fazzari

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #15 on: November 13, 2015, 11:09:21 PM »


Any suggestions on how to get a more tender crisp?

Mo,
Time can give you more tenderness.  After going through all that work of making your dough, I would have loved to seen what would have happened if you had more doughs to bake at later dates.

Also time in the sheeting process can also give you more tenderness....that is, when the dough starts to snap back...stop, let it rest 4 or 5 minutes, then sheet again.  The less you manipulate your dough, the more tender it will be.

Good work on your pizza.....if you go without the lamination, you should also get a nice tender pizza as you won't have to sheet as much.  But this is where the mixing process is a big help in the texture you are after.  Again, great job!!

John

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #16 on: November 16, 2015, 04:47:20 AM »
Hey John

After rolling out my last dough to the desired size, I placed a 12" pan and used it to cut out a nice round skin. I took the left over pieces of dough and kneaded it together before dumping it back into a plastic bag and in to the fridge.

It sat in the fridge up until yesterday 12PM which made it a total of 86 hours in the fridge from the time my original dough was made. The dough weight was +-380g so I split it into 2 pieces and gave it a very gentle balling just to get it round since when I split it I was left with a ball that was a half moon shaped.I was ready to use the dough by about 3PM.

It was rolled out using a rolling pin to approx 11" - i managed to get it extremely, extremely thin - so thin that that 2 tiny holes eventually appeared which was indication that I was over doing it  ;D. Anyways, I pinched the holes together - topped the pizza and baked it on the bottom rack on 210c. Do note that I took these Pizza's to bake at someone elses house and their oven is totally different from mine. I baked the pies for approx 6 minutes - checking the bottom every minute after the 3 minute mark just to make sure it wasn't charring too much. After 6 mins, the cheese was bubbling profusely and I felt the pie was done. I removed it and baked the 2nd pie in the same manner.

I was quite impressed with both pies - the crust had just a slight bit of crispiness - probably a 3 on my Crisp Scale. I should note that the crust was very nice and tender. I don't know if I can attribute this to the oven or not but the bottom of the pies didn't char as much as the one in my previous post - in fact it didn't even come close to it but only another test can confirm that  ^^^

In my next attempt, which will probably be in a week or so because wife and kids are a little sick of Pizza this week - I don't mind having another slice though  :drool:, I have a couple of questions to ask if you don't mind answering.

1. I'd like to allow the dough to ferment in my fridge for approx 3 days before using it - can I use the exact same formula and method I used here - http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=40107.msg402758#msg402758

2. Must I allow the dough to warm up in the oven before placing the bulk dough into the fridge?

3. I'm going to make enough dough to do 3 X 12" Skins. 2 Skins are going to be laminated one over the other - the 3rd skin no lamination. I'm going to make each skin about 200g - is this a sufficient weight to allow the skin to be rolled to 12"?


Sorry,  no pics - the kids were ravishing the pizza so I had to take the pic as quick as I could - the quality of them are just too poor to see any details

Take care.
Mo

Regards Mo


Offline fazzari

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #17 on: November 16, 2015, 01:16:47 PM »
Mo
I hope your experiments go well.  Here are the thoughts that go into the process though.....When you sheet low hydration doughs, it is much easier when the dough is warm, this goes for rolling pins or commercial sheeters, and so that is the reason I originally started warming the dough up after mix.  The less effort you use to sheet your skins, the more tender they will be.  But, secondly, one can use stretch and folds, even on low hydration doughs to build strength.  This is also much easier when the dough is warm.  My preference is to sheet the doughs when warm, and then let the skins sit in the fridge until used.  They will not last forever though, maybe 3 to 4 days max, and every batch will be different. 
You can make any "weight" of dough into a skin, what's important is the thickness of the skin.  What I do is cut small square pizzas from my larger rectangle sheet, eliminating any waste at all.
Have fun experimenting
John

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #18 on: November 17, 2015, 06:38:59 AM »
Hi Fazzari

Now I understand the need for Hot Water and high amount of yeast. My only problem with rolling out the skin and then storing it in the fridge is space constraints. I remember reading once about folding the dough into quarters and then unfolding it again when ready to use. Will this work with this formula.

I'm also curious to know if a Cold Ferment of a couple days will make any difference to the extensibility and elasticity of the skin when ready to roll. I know the yeast breaks down the gluten so wondering if it will made the dough easier to sheet?

I've got quite a number of tests ahead of me - just don't know when to start and find people to start feeding the pizza's  :-D

Mo
Regards Mo

Offline fazzari

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #19 on: November 17, 2015, 11:39:35 AM »
Hi Fazzari

Now I understand the need for Hot Water and high amount of yeast. My only problem with rolling out the skin and then storing it in the fridge is space constraints. I remember reading once about folding the dough into quarters and then unfolding it again when ready to use. Will this work with this formula.

I'm also curious to know if a Cold Ferment of a couple days will make any difference to the extensibility and elasticity of the skin when ready to roll. I know the yeast breaks down the gluten so wondering if it will made the dough easier to sheet?

I've got quite a number of tests ahead of me - just don't know when to start and find people to start feeding the pizza's  :-D

Mo
Hey Mo
One thing I forgot, these skins freeze up just fine, in fact I use the freezer as part of my dough management in the restaurant.  So, I can't imagine a small flat stack of skins would take up that much space.  When you want to bake them up, just put them in the fridge at least 12 hours and up to 3 days or so before use.
I have tried cold fermenting a dough overnight before, the sheeting process is much tougher to do, especially with a rolling pin.  The resulting skin was very good, but not noticeably any better than one sheeted from warm dough.  I know I would never try it again...so I'm anxious to hear if you do and what your results are.

John

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #20 on: January 14, 2016, 09:59:57 AM »
Hello all

I've been away from Pizza Making for a while now and need to get my hands wet again with a bit of dough  :chef:

Before I left off, this was the last dough I made - Laminated Cracker Style - an absolute keeper and I wish to push the limit even further.

John has performed some astounding experiments and has pushed the limit on every level. I was browsing the cracker style forum when I came upon a thread where John experimented with High Hydration Dough. I know it's a pretty old thread and I don't know how much of it John can remember but I couldn't help but be inspired to give this formula a go. I'm planning 3 doughs in the next couple of days - all cracker crust but with slight variation. Here they are below.

Fazzari High Hydration Cracker Style with Layering
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=5889.msg50429#msg50429
Flour (100%):
Water (60%):
IDY (0.75%):
Salt (2%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (5%):
Total (167.75%):
99.74 g  |  3.52 oz | 0.22 lbs
59.84 g  |  2.11 oz | 0.13 lbs
0.75 g | 0.03 oz | 0 lbs | 0.25 tsp | 0.08 tbsp
1.99 g | 0.07 oz | 0 lbs | 0.36 tsp | 0.12 tbsp
4.99 g | 0.18 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.1 tsp | 0.37 tbsp
167.31 g | 5.9 oz | 0.37 lbs | TF = 0.104

Few unanswered question on this recipe.
  • Should I use hot water or normal tap water?
  • Do I let the dough rise in a warm oven or at room temp?
  • This 1 is a bit of a blonde question - I'm just trying to wrap my head around it - to get 3 layers, do I fold the dough over itself 3 times?

Fazzari High Hydration Dough - No Layering
2nd Dough is exactly the same as the one above but I won't be layering it - just roll out once and ready to bake.
I'm wondering whether anything needs to change in the formula like the Thickness Factor?

Fazzari Laminated Crust
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=30434.msg322842#msg322842
Flour (100%):
Water (50%):
IDY (0.75%):
Salt (2%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (4%):
Sugar (2%):
Total (158.75%):
70.94 g  |  2.5 oz | 0.16 lbs
35.47 g  |  1.25 oz | 0.08 lbs
0.53 g | 0.02 oz | 0 lbs | 0.18 tsp | 0.06 tbsp
1.42 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.25 tsp | 0.08 tbsp
2.84 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.62 tsp | 0.21 tbsp
1.42 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.36 tsp | 0.12 tbsp
112.61 g | 3.97 oz | 0.25 lbs | TF = 0.07
I have tried this recipe before and it was excellent - this time I'm going to try it minus the lamination. I know this will be too much dough so I came up with this formula - please let me know if it meets my requirements?

Please feel free to chip in with whatever comments or criticism you have.

Fazzari, I hope you come across this post - there's some questions in here that I'm sure you can shed some light on.

Thanks
Mo
Regards Mo

Offline fazzari

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #21 on: January 14, 2016, 11:31:58 AM »
Mo
You are a very ambitious sort aren't you?  As for your questions regarding the high hydration dough.....the higher hydration makes this dough a lot easier to sheet, it really doesn't matter as much how hot your water is.  It's the process that matters, and I just try to make it as easy as I can by using warm water.  I think way back when I first did this, I just let the dough rise at room temp....it won't hurt to do it in the oven either....remember, it's simply the process of sheeting that matters.  If you fold a sheet of dough on itself in three layers, sheet this out and then repeat the process, you will have a sheet of doughs with 9 layers in it.

If you are going to make a dough with no layering, I would highly suggest that you try and develop the dough as much as you can.  I have tested this out pretty substantially.  I would use the warm oven method and do plenty of stretch and folds, unless you have a mixer that will do the work for you.  I think the thickness factor would stay close to the same

The amounts you have listed in the last recipe will make about a 7 inch pizza

Remember to get your final skins cold very quickly to stop them from rising the least bit....this is where I use a freezer
Best Wishes Mo
John

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #22 on: January 15, 2016, 03:29:58 AM »
 :-D Abitious - lol. I guess once you get your hands into Pizza Making - you either love it or hate it - no in between  :P . I guess I love it to the point where your last pie is just not good enough and you want to always push the limits.

I forgot to mention in my post the size of each of the pies - I'm using 8.5" for the thickness factor stipulated on each of the 3 recipes.
Regards Mo

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #23 on: January 22, 2016, 04:23:18 AM »
As promised - here are the results on the 3 recipes I posted further up in this thread.

Fazzari High Hydration Cracker Style with Layering
Used the basic method of mixing all of the ingredients in my Mixer Bowl and using the Paddle Attachment - I kneaded the dough for about 3 minutes.
It was then put in to a warm oven for 90mins to rise.
Rolling out this dough was easy as Fazzari promised - you had to be careful not to go too thin. I then folded it 3  times - repeating this process 3 times in total. Just one note here - I found that if you roll the dough into a circle - it's difficult to fold it - next time I'll try and roll it into a square.
Rolled dough was baked directly on stone (lowest oven rack) at 230C for 2 mins before I slipped a screen underneath for another 2 mins to save the bottom from being overdone.

We loved this Pizza - kids had a feast although  it was only a 8.5" pie  :-D . One thing I'm really failing with is the under carriage on my pie - I find the crust there still too tough - more like a crunch instead of a crisp. I think it's just a matter of playing around with bake times and not leaving it on my stone for too long - planning another experiment for next week hopefully - that's if I can convince the wife and kids  >:D

Fazzari High Hydration Dough - No Layering
This attempt for unfortunately a complete failure. Transferring the pie to my peel ended up folding over itself and trying to resuscitate it made it even work - i just topped it and put it in the oven as quick as I can - It baked up really really crispy - I can't comment much about this one because before i got to the table to grab a slice - it was all gone  :'(

Fazzari Laminated Crust without Lamination
I really liked this crust. If I were to compare it with the Laminated crust - I honestly couldn't detect a difference but then again I would have to make the 2 side by side to confirm that for sure since the Laminated one I made a while back. I was slightly dissapointed with the undercarriage again - a little too tough for my tooth - Since all my pies had the same toughness int he undercarriage - I'm leaning towards 2 possibilities - Flour or Stone - will play around a bit too see which one is the culprit.

There was a 4th Pizza that found it's way to my oven and this was left me a little bit baffled at the results. From the Layered Pie above, I was left with some bits and pieces after cutting out my 8.5" pie. I balled this up and tossed it in the fridge not wanted to wasted the little dough. The Oven was still nice and hot and I wasn't over saturated so though I'd roll out this dough and see where it leads to. I managed to roll it out to about 6" or so. I baked it directly on the stone for about 4 minutes before slipping a screen underneath for a further 2 mins. I was quite shocked that the under carriage didn't have a much of a crisp at all considering it was the smallest Pizza of the lot and spent the most amount of time on the stone. We actually enjoyed this pie - it had a soft under crust with a slight bit of chew followed by a nice crispy rim. I guess it's one of those lucky attempt where I'll never figure out what contributed to the end result.

Enjoy the pics - the pic of the whole pie is Laminated Crust without Lamination
The slice Pic is of the Layered Pie (High Hydration)

Mo
Regards Mo

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Cracker Style - Balance between Crispy & Soft
« Reply #24 on: Yesterday at 09:45:32 AM »
Hello Fazzari

I've been analyzing your High Hydration Layered Dough found here http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=5889.msg50429#msg50429 and made 1 discovery. Your Pie seems to puff up quite a bit with the layers very visible however when I made mine - it wasn't the case although it was really tasty. I pondered over this thinking why wasn't my layers so noticeable and then it struck me - maybe I'm rolling out the final skin too thin. When I attempted this Pizza, I had quite a bit of dough left over that I could actually make another pie out from it - that left me thinking whether I should have been left with so much off cuts.

Basically my question to you is how much off cuts do you end up with after you've rolled out your skin and cut it to the desired size?

I'm planning another attempt soon  :drool:

Thanks
Mo
Regards Mo