Author Topic: What woods can I burn in a WFO?  (Read 6497 times)

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Offline Jackie Tran

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What woods can I burn in a WFO?
« on: March 05, 2011, 05:53:39 PM »
Trying to source some hardwoods in the Albuquerque area for my potential future WFO.   I've only bought very small portions of hardwoods bbq'ing in the past and I usually just get it from guys selling it on the street corners.  No real connections or good sources for wood.

I looked on Craigslist which only produced 1 seller and he wants an obscene amount for oak, hickory, and mesquite.  I mean really obscene prices since he processes them into small chunks.

He does have other seasoned hardwoods that he is willing to sell at firewood prices, $165 for 1/2 cord and $290 for a full cord.    He has aspen, elm, and mulberry. 

I did a quick google search and found this firewood btu guide.
http://www.thelograck.com/firewood_rating_chart.html

It looks like mulberry might be my next best option if I can't find a decently priced oak source.
2 questions.

1) has anyone burned aspen, elm, or mulberry in their WFO for pizza?   Or anything else for that matter.  The more options the better.

2) Will these hardwoods impart any funky flavors into my pizza?   There seems to be some controversy as to whether or not woods will impart any smokiness flavor to pizza, but is this true regardless of the type of woods used.

I know better to stay away from woods that contain sap so I'm passing on the pinon and alligator juniper.

Chau


buceriasdon

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Re: What woods can I burn in a WFO?
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2011, 06:05:37 PM »
Chau, Cross off aspen and elm, both poor burning softwoods. Both are fast growing trees.
Don

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: What woods can I burn in a WFO?
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2011, 06:26:46 PM »
Chau - There is a huge mulberry tree right behind my WFO, and I use the fallen branches in the WFO - it burns beautifully. There is a slightly sweet smell while it is burning, but I have never tasted it in the pizza. Just make sure the wood you are receiving is absolutely dry (seasoned).

John

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: What woods can I burn in a WFO?
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2011, 06:31:35 PM »
Thank you guys very much.  He did mention the sweet smell.  I asked him several times about it being seasoned, and he said all his woods were "good to go".  :-D  I'll be sure to press him on how many seasons.   Also not sure if $290/cord (assuming it's a true cord) is a good price but I do know that we don't have an abudance of trees out here.

Chau

Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: What woods can I burn in a WFO?
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2011, 08:03:10 PM »
The ppc is going to vary depending on where you live. The cheapest place I found in the area for a 6 month season was $350, most expensive was $500. I forget how much I payed for the cord, it was around $400 or $425 for 2 year seasoned oak. Most of the places had a minimum season of a year and were around $400-$425 for mix cords. They mostly consist of oak but there are other types in there like maples which are very good burning woods, birch and beech. Definitely stay away from the sap bairing woods and anything that gives off sparks. When you do get the cord make sure you ask for a chopping stump. Another thing is that you get the right stuff to split the wood. Don't get an axe get a maul or one of these log splitters http://www.homedepot.com/Tools-Hardware-Hand-Tools-Axes/h_d1/N-5yc1vZaq6f/R-100387771/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053. This is optional, I got a hatchet and a 4lb steel hammer to cut smaller pieces to start and feed the fire. Oh yea and a good pair of gloves. It's exciting to see you starting to get the WFO in the works, its going to be awesome to see what you are going to do. Good luck with everything.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2011, 08:04:45 PM by BrickStoneOven »

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: What woods can I burn in a WFO?
« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2011, 08:14:52 PM »
Thank you for the info and great tips David.  I plan on getting a log splitter but I do have a machete sitting around not getting any use at the moment.   I hope not to dissappoint.  8) 

Offline andreguidon

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Re: What woods can I burn in a WFO?
« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2011, 07:30:07 AM »
Chau, if baking neapolitan 90s pizzas you will never taste the wood, the bake is too fast, be aware of wood that keeps pooping you dont want a popped piece of wood in your pizza....
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Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: What woods can I burn in a WFO?
« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2011, 07:44:18 AM »
Thank you Andre.  That is very good to know.  I'll stay away from woods that spark alot, or just reduce them down to coals first, then add a non-sparking wood to refresh the fire.   Excellent tips, I can use all the help I can get. 

Chau

Offline c0mpl3x

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Re: What woods can I burn in a WFO?
« Reply #8 on: March 06, 2011, 10:24:32 PM »
softwoods are ok to start your fire, but whenever i use the frankengrill i fire it with apple brances (both red and crab) and sometimes with huckleberry or mulberry branches.

i use oak, hickory, and cherry (cherry almost exclusively) for the main firelogs to turn into coals.    i want to try using some sassafras and lavender just to see what it does later when the snow goes away again
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Offline pazzonoah

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Re: What woods can I burn in a WFO?
« Reply #9 on: March 09, 2011, 11:14:04 PM »
I've had WFO for several years now and live just a little north in Colorado so happy to provide input. definitely stick with the hardwoods (oak is best, ash is great, hickory, maple, walnut, locust, beech also good), but some softwoods are fine if you can get them cheap or for free - use softwood just to get the oven up to temp - once it is up to temp stick with the hardwoods. while you are at it get to know the difference between seasoned and green (unseasoned) wood. buying green wood is the worst, so invest in a cheap moisture meter (I found one by centec at harbor freight for cheap).  it has saved me a few times from buying really wet wood - once you get to know how it feels and looks you wont need it anymore though. you want wood about 20% moisture or less. also a good idea to make sure it is in nice even 16 or 18 lengths as buying chunks can become a pain (at least for me it was). tell the seller you have moisture meter and that you will refuse to take it if the wood is green. i usually have to pay anywhere from $60 to $100+ for a quarter cord of good hardwood to have it delivered. good oak (from the ozarks) will be expensive, but you will understand why if you burn it. 


Offline flyboy4ual

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Re: What woods can I burn in a WFO?
« Reply #10 on: March 09, 2011, 11:17:44 PM »
What about Avocado wood?  I seem to have a lot of that in my area.

Scott D.

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: What woods can I burn in a WFO?
« Reply #11 on: March 10, 2011, 12:09:54 AM »
Thank you very much Pazzonoah for the info.  I will check out Harbor Freight tomorrow for a moisture meter and a log splitter.

Chau

Offline pazzonoah

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Re: What woods can I burn in a WFO?
« Reply #12 on: March 10, 2011, 09:47:10 AM »
regarding log splitter - not really necessary unless you are buying or collecting larger unsplit logs of wood - if you are buying pre split wood, which is normally the case for me, then all you would need is a nice splitting axe. check out fiskars pro splitting axe - its like slicing butter after trying others. are you planning on building your own, or are you buying a pre-built?

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: What woods can I burn in a WFO?
« Reply #13 on: March 10, 2011, 10:12:16 AM »
Chau,

The local suppliers will sell short-cut oak (16") with the larger pieces already split. This is what I use for firing up the WFO. But for me these are too big for tossing on the coal bed to keep the fire going during the cooking session. I just use a chain saw to slice larger pieces up into small chunks of varying sizes. I also use these chunks for maintaining heat/smoke in my BBQ pit. The pile of sawdust left over is good for stoking the fire if you need a blast of flames to arc across the dome and down on the top of the pie.

Never found a splitter would be of use to me.

 

Online Mmmph

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Re: What woods can I burn in a WFO?
« Reply #14 on: March 10, 2011, 10:42:46 AM »
While you're looking for seasoned hardwood, also buy green wood for use in 6-8 months...If you have the space to stack and store it covered. Cheaper!

Note though: Try not to buy wood that's been cut in the spring (Just ask when it was cut).
Sap rises and the wood is greener/wetter and takes longer to dry.
Sono venuto, ho visto, ho mangiato

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: What woods can I burn in a WFO?
« Reply #15 on: March 10, 2011, 11:02:00 AM »
Great tips all, keep 'em coming.  I'm sure this info will be very valuable to WFO noobs like me.   

Pazzonoah - I believe that is the axe that I just bought a couple of months ago.  Not sure about the "pro" part, but it's a fiskar splitting axe for sure.   Seems much lighter in weight than a traditional axe.  Not sure if that is a good thing or not.   The blade has a funky design that helps split the wood.   I've only had a few swings with it though.   

Thanks Bill, I'll hold off on the log splitter for now.   

Mmmph good idea on the preseasoned wood and making sure it isn't cut in the spring.  I'll have to make a list to remember to ask all these questions. 

Chau

Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: What woods can I burn in a WFO?
« Reply #16 on: March 10, 2011, 11:34:42 AM »
Also the form you use to split the wood is something to keep in mind. You definitely dont want to throw out your back or shoulder or chop off your leg... Your going to be spliting a lot of wood and you can get hurt and tired really easy if you are doing it wrong.
« Last Edit: March 10, 2011, 11:36:15 AM by BrickStoneOven »

Offline Cass

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Re: What woods can I burn in a WFO?
« Reply #17 on: March 10, 2011, 12:34:43 PM »
I agree, you should not need a splitter but you can always rent one before you buy.

I split all the wood for my oven with an axe.

And I'm an old lady.

 :P
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Offline flyboy4ual

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Re: What woods can I burn in a WFO?
« Reply #18 on: March 10, 2011, 12:38:03 PM »
Avocado wood okay? anybody?

Scott D.

Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: What woods can I burn in a WFO?
« Reply #19 on: March 10, 2011, 01:00:58 PM »
Avocado wood okay? anybody?

Scott D.

Scott the searchs didn't really bring up much. It's about 20.8 BTU, has no scent when burned. One place said it was good for starting the fire because it was a soft wood. Then another said it was a very good firewood because it was a hardwood. There was a link for a forum and one of the members said it had sap. Your best bet would be to burn some well seasoned avocado and see how it performs.


 

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