Author Topic: Volumes, Weights, & Bakers Percents  (Read 747 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline PapaJon

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 146
  • Location: SoCal
  • "That's amore"
Volumes, Weights, & Bakers Percents
« on: March 09, 2011, 06:09:28 PM »
I have a simple question which may not have a simple answer or answer at all, but if possible I'd love to hear others opinions and advice.

The gist of the question is regarding smaller volume measurements such as tsp and tbsp, and how much such a small amount might affect the end recipe.  The ingredients that would be measured would be salt, yeast, sugar, spices, etc.

The reason for my question is that my current digital scale only goes down to 1.0g resolution, and I'm wondering if a volume measurement might not end up being more accurate or at least equally accurate without the hassle of weighing. 

One other issue I have is when adjusting  recipes that are in bakers percent quite often I end up with an in between weight like 4.5g yeast.

Perhaps the real answer to the question is to get a more accurate scale which I very likely will, but for sake of argument how about those teaspoon/tablespoon volume measurements?
Jon


Offline Tscarborough

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 3522
  • Location: Austin, TX
    • Pizza Anarchy
Re: Volumes, Weights, & Bakers Percents
« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2011, 08:48:04 AM »
You will get both sides from this site, but my opinion is that once you figure out what your dough should look and feel like, you do not need to weigh anything, and only need to measure volumetricly, if at all.  For non food service cooking, of course.


Offline c0mpl3x

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1130
  • Age: 28
  • Location: north of pittsburgh PA
  • crumb bubbles!
Re: Volumes, Weights, & Bakers Percents
« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2011, 09:12:56 AM »
You will get both sides from this site, but my opinion is that once you figure out what your dough should look and feel like, you do not need to weigh anything, and only need to measure volumetricly, if at all.  For non food service cooking, of course.



i can make dough without using percentages or volume and work 100% by feel and know if its right or not.  my best doughs have been made this way
Hotdogs kill more people than sharks do, yearly.

Offline PapaJon

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 146
  • Location: SoCal
  • "That's amore"
Re: Volumes, Weights, & Bakers Percents
« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2011, 12:30:30 PM »
Thanks for the responses guys.

Ok, I get that I may be curious about something that may not be a big deal, but while I think it's great some people can get a consistent feeling dough by using touch and site alone, this really only has to do with the water vs flour ratio and nothing really to do with the ingredients I mention in the OP.  Can you feel a difference in regards to yeast, salt, sugar, spices when you make your dough, I kind of doubt it, but then again the slight variance in measurements of these ingredients may really not matter at all.  Perhaps the biggest player in the circle is yeast followed perhaps by salt.
Jon

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 22323
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Volumes, Weights, & Bakers Percents
« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2011, 12:46:13 PM »
Jon,

If I understood your question correctly, you are not attempting to get opinions on volume versus weight measurements generally. If so, I would rather let that sleeping dog lie.

Now, to your question about measuring out small amounts of lightweight ingredients, my practice is to use the volume measurements produced by the various dough calculating tools that I use. I have conducted many test measurements for items like yeast, salt, sugar and oil and I am satisfied that the volume measurements from the dough calculating tools are close enough to use. Consequently, unless there is a lot of a particular ingredient, like oil, I use my scale only to weigh flour and water. I have a special scale that can weigh out small amounts of lightweight ingredients, but having satisfied myself that the volume measurements from the dough calculating tool are accurate enough for my purposes, I don't use that scale to weigh out items. I may use it occasionally to do a volume to weight conversions for items for which I have not been able to find conversion data.

You can read further on this topic and related issues from some of my posts, including Reply 36 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4565.msg39027/topicseen.html#msg39027, Reply 2 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8660.msg74979/topicseen.html#msg74979, Reply 17 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7465.msg64396/topicseen.html#msg64396, and Reply 22 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12446.msg119543/topicseen.html#msg119543.

Peter

Offline November

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1879
  • Location: North America
  • Come for the food. Stay for the science.
    • Uncle Salmon
Re: Volumes, Weights, & Bakers Percents
« Reply #5 on: March 10, 2011, 01:02:20 PM »
i can make dough without using percentages or volume and work 100% by feel and know if its right or not.  my best doughs have been made this way

This "feels" like an overcompensating ideology.  Nobody can "feel" the correct amount of yeast or salt.  Due to their fulcra, these components must be measured in some way for consistency, even if it's just visually.  A dough with with 0.5% yeast and 5% yeast "feels" exactly the same.  Though there should be no doubt that a dough with 5% yeast will not perform optimally.

Offline Tscarborough

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 3522
  • Location: Austin, TX
    • Pizza Anarchy
Re: Volumes, Weights, & Bakers Percents
« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2011, 02:44:30 PM »
Yes, for those items, you have to get them from the container to the dough, so some type of measuring device will be used.  Is a regular spoon accurate enough?  Probably, but I do use a measuring spoon.


 

pizzapan