Author Topic: Tuscan wild starter used in Tartine bread  (Read 2241 times)

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Offline Bill/SFNM

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Tuscan wild starter used in Tartine bread
« on: March 15, 2011, 02:28:12 PM »
Over in the legendary Tartine Bread thread, I discussed some loaves I made with a wild starter captured in Tuscany:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12042.msg131287.html#msg131287

I was asked about the starter. Rather than muck up that thread, I have created a new one here.

My Tuscan starter is the only one I have that is not from sourdo.com. It was given to me by a baker friend who captured it during a visit to Tuscany. She baked some breads with it that were awesome, so I was so excited to get it, imagining all of the wonderful things I was going to bake with a magical culture from the foodie heaven that is Tuscany.

For whatever reasons, my results were far from magical, so I rarely use it, feeding it every few months out of pity and loyalty. The other day I was straightening up in the fridge and decided it was time to dump it. But I thought that maybe I should give it one more chance. So I brought it back to life and tried it in a batch of Tartine. Amazing taste and oven spring! Probably a fluke, so I tried it again today. Even more amazing - according to beloved wife who is brutally honest about my cooking efforts.

I was so close to throwing it out. Many lessons learned. Maybe I'll try it in my next batch of pizza. Stay tuned.
« Last Edit: March 15, 2011, 02:44:07 PM by Bill/SFNM »


Offline Mick.Chicago

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Re: Tuscan wild starter used in Tartine bread
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2011, 02:43:47 PM »
Bravo!  I've been meaning to ask where the dark coloration comes from in the tartine loaves! Is it the level of sugar developed?

Offline ponzu

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Re: Tuscan wild starter used in Tartine bread
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2011, 03:01:47 PM »
The 11th commandment...

Thou shalt not discard a usable starter. ;D
AZ

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Tuscan wild starter used in Tartine bread
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2011, 03:06:29 PM »
I've been meaning to ask where the dark coloration comes from in the tartine loaves! Is it the level of sugar developed?

Hard to say. Blast of steam gives surface sugars a head start in caramelization? High hydration allows for baking at higher temps for longer period without burning and without drying out crumb?


Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Tuscan wild starter used in Tartine bread
« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2011, 03:25:41 PM »
MC, 10% semolina flour in my breads have been giving me noticeably darker loaves.  Does anyone think the dark color is related to the specific flour and/or baking process?

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Tuscan wild starter used in Tartine bread
« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2011, 03:33:45 PM »
Does anyone think the dark color is related to the specific flour and/or baking process?

Any bread will darken if baked long enough. I would guess I am baking Tartines longer than I have previous baked other breads of similar surface area/volume ratios. 

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Tuscan wild starter used in Tartine bread
« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2011, 03:38:00 PM »
Any bread will darken if baked long enough. I would guess I am baking Tartines longer than I have previous baked other breads of similar surface area/volume ratios. 

That's true.  I was thinking some flours will darken faster because of the protein ratio or from mixing in WW or semolina.

Bill can you compare the taste of the Tuscan starter to the popular ischia?

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Tuscan wild starter used in Tartine bread
« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2011, 03:48:16 PM »
That's true.  I was thinking some flours will darken faster because of the protein ratio or from mixing in WW or semolina.

Bill can you compare the taste of the Tuscan starter to the popular ischia?

OK, I'm really bad at this, but the Tartine bread with the Tuscan was more intense, sweeter and more buttery. It seemed to be in better balance with the more strongly-flavored Tartine crust. Everyone's eye popped open wide when they started eating this batch. More flavor, better flavor. I'll try to get you a sample one of these days.  :D

I'll be making a batch of pizza dough with Tuscan starter soon. That should be interesting.

Offline StrayBullet

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Re: Tuscan wild starter used in Tartine bread
« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2011, 03:57:54 PM »
I was so close to throwing it out. Many lessons learned. Maybe I'll try it in my next batch of pizza. Stay tuned.


In your opinion what changed in the starter that made it work these two times compared to the times before?  Thanks!

Mark

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Tuscan wild starter used in Tartine bread
« Reply #9 on: March 15, 2011, 04:01:18 PM »
In your opinion what changed in the starter that made it work these two times compared to the times before?  Thanks!

Mark

The whole Tartine process: formula, handling, fermentation, baking - may all favor this culture. I would guess the main factors would be fermentation: the room temp folding period and the overnight in the fridge.


Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Tuscan wild starter used in Tartine bread
« Reply #10 on: March 15, 2011, 04:04:23 PM »
Looking forward to it Bill.   :chef:

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Tuscan wild starter used in Tartine bread
« Reply #11 on: March 15, 2011, 04:09:24 PM »
I will add that despite being dormant for several months, after a few days of feeding this culture was the most powerful yet in the Tartine milieu - faster and greater rise during fermentation, proofing, and baking. Still too soon to know what is going on.

Offline Bistro

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Re: Tuscan wild starter used in Tartine bread
« Reply #12 on: July 10, 2011, 07:29:50 PM »
Just curious if you maybe tried the starter in a Pizza yet? And maybe didn't tell us about it...Would love to hear about it if you did.

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Tuscan wild starter used in Tartine bread
« Reply #13 on: July 10, 2011, 07:39:57 PM »
Just curious if you maybe tried the starter in a Pizza yet? And maybe didn't tell us about it...Would love to hear about it if you did.

Lately, almost all my pies are made with the Tuscan starter as described in this thread:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12122.0.html

This is mainly because I am still crazy about Tartine bread with the Tuscan starter and often make batches of bread and pizza dough from the same starter activation. However, I would still give a very slight edge to my Ischia starter for the best tasting pizza depending on my mood. Both make outstanding Neapolitan-style crust - the Tuscan just a bit milder.


 

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