Author Topic: Uno's Chicago Grill Deep Dish Pizza  (Read 6237 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline DKM

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1684
  • Age: 45
  • Location: Texas
  • Chicago - Now that's Pizza!
    • The Emperor.net
I'm on too many of these boards


Offline loowaters

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 610
  • Age: 44
  • Location: Somewhere...in Iowa.
  • Where's my knife and fork?
Re: Uno's Chicago Grill Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2011, 08:09:14 PM »
I don't like being told how to make Chicago style deep dish by a guy who calls it "peet-zer".  Otherwise...nice find. Thanks.

Loo
Using pizza to expand my waistline since 1969!

Offline DKM

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1684
  • Age: 45
  • Location: Texas
  • Chicago - Now that's Pizza!
    • The Emperor.net
Re: Uno's Chicago Grill Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2011, 11:05:53 PM »
Peter,

Can you work your magic and calculate % from the recipe on the site?

DKM
I'm on too many of these boards

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21194
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Uno's Chicago Grill Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2011, 11:15:16 PM »
DKM,

I think I should be able to come up wth something to get you started. I will post a dough formulation tomorrow.

Peter

Offline loowaters

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 610
  • Age: 44
  • Location: Somewhere...in Iowa.
  • Where's my knife and fork?
Re: Uno's Chicago Grill Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2011, 10:16:18 AM »
I probably should've slapped a smiley face on my post.  I was only kidding around.  

Regarding the recipe, it looked good but, again, an entire package of yeast is too much for that size dough ball and may have contributed to the crust blowing up a bit on it.  I know, with the high amount of oil in the dough the effect of the yeast is reduced a bit but still...  Also, that knead time is longer than most of us go with, however, again, the oil.  In the amounts we use it in our DD formulations, gluten formation never gets out of hand due to the "shortening" in the dough no matter how long the knead.  I do like the more "rustic" appearance that results from a shorter knead, though.

Loo
« Last Edit: March 16, 2011, 10:31:34 AM by loowaters »
Using pizza to expand my waistline since 1969!

Offline DKM

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1684
  • Age: 45
  • Location: Texas
  • Chicago - Now that's Pizza!
    • The Emperor.net
Re: Uno's Chicago Grill Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2011, 10:24:14 AM »
I'm more wanting to play with it. 

I'll try it once "as is" and then go from there.
I'm on too many of these boards

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21194
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Uno's Chicago Grill Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2011, 01:19:37 PM »
DKM,

I have presented below my attempt at converting the Uno’s dough recipe to baker’s percent format. To do that, I first did some basic math conversions and then used the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html to come up with the final dough formulation in baker’s percent format. Since the flour is given as a volume measurement, I used the Mass-Volume Conversion Calculator at http://foodsim.unclesalmon.com/ to convert the volume of flour to weight. For this purpose, I used the King Arthur all-purpose flour as a proxy for the (unspecified) all-purpose flour shown in the video. Since the flour in the video is shown in the measuring cups as being level, I used the Medium flour Measurement Method in the Mass-Volume Conversion Calculator on the assumption that the flour was scooped out of a container and then leveled off. For the water conversion, I assumed that a cup of water weighs 8.2 ounces. As the video notes, there may be a need to adjust the amounts of flour and water to achieve the desired consistency and pliability of the dough.

With respect to the flour, you will perhaps want to note that, according to the Uno’s website at http://www.unos.com/nutrition.php, all of their deep-dish pizzas use bleached flour. Whether that flour is an all-purpose flour or a cake flour, as has been discussed in the past, is not indicated in the ingredients list provided at the Uno’s website. Also, the Uno’s ingredients lists indicate that the flour mix includes soybean oil, quite likely in an encapsulated spray form, as well as more soybean oil at the time of preparation of the dough. It may well be that the added soybean oil is to oil the dough balls and/or the baking pan. For my purposes, I treated the corn oil and the olive oil separately in the dough formulation but, in practice, the two oils should eventually both be incorporated into the final dough. So, the total oil quantity in the dough from a baker's percent standpoint should be close to 20.24% (or maybe a bit less if all of the olive oil in the bowl does not get fully incorporated). Of course, one can choose to use soybean oil instead of the corn oil and olive oil shown in the video. For all practical purposes, the volume measurements if soybean oil is used exclusively would be about the same as shown in the dough formulation presented below.

I also learned from some Google searches that the two sizes of deep-dish pizzas at Uno’s are 7” and 10”, not 12” as shown in the video. However, if the thickness factor is known for the 12” size, it should be easy to use that thickness factor to produce an amount of dough for any other size pizza, for both straight-sided or sloping-sided pans. To ascertain the thickness factor for the dough shell shown in the video, I used the deep-dish dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/dd_calculator.html. I simply used the baker’s percents from the expanded dough calculating tool and the pan shape and dimensions (12" and straight-sided), together with the depth of the dough in the pan (1 1/2"), and played around with the value in the thickness factor box until I got the same weights as produced by the expanded dough calculating tool. In this case, the value of thickness factor I got was 0.13149. That is the value that one should use in the deep-dish dough calculating tool for scaling purposes.

After all was said and done, I ended up with the following dough formulation:

All-Purpose Flour* (100%):
Water (52.3182%):
ADY (2.12676%):
Salt (3.34964%):
Olive Oil (4.04%):
Corn Oil (16.2032%):
Sugar (1.1963%):
Total (179.2341%):
333.26 g  |  11.76 oz | 0.73 lbs
174.36 g  |  6.15 oz | 0.38 lbs
7.09 g | 0.25 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.88 tsp | 0.63 tbsp
11.16 g | 0.39 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2 tsp | 0.67 tbsp
13.46 g | 0.47 oz | 0.03 lbs | 2.99 tsp | 1 tbsp
54 g | 1.9 oz | 0.12 lbs | 12 tsp | 4 tbsp
3.99 g | 0.14 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1 tsp | 0.33 tbsp
597.32 g | 21.07 oz | 1.32 lbs | TF = N/A
Note: Nominal thickness factor for use in the deep-dish dough calculating tool = 0.13149; no bowl residue compensation factor
*Based on King Arthur all-purpose flour

As a cross check of the above dough formulation against the real thing, I compared the pecking order of a pepperoni pizza using the above dough formulation against an Uno’s pepperoni deep-dish pizza, and the numbers are in the right place in the pecking order. I should note, however, that Uno’s does not use a combination of provolone cheese and mozzarella cheese. According to their website, they use only low-moisture, part-skim mozzarella cheese. Also, they use a somewhat different pizza sauce. They use a combination of diced tomato and tomato puree, rather than ground tomatoes. The Uno’s sauce also includes salt, spice (quite possibly including oregano and basil), and black pepper.

When I have a chance, I would like to extrapolate from the 12” size pepperoni deep-dish pizza to a 10” size to see if the proportions of the two size pizzas line up properly. To do this, I will have to calculate the amounts of cheeses and sauce used in the 12” size per square inch of surface area. However, for now, I think the above should get you started.

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21194
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Uno's Chicago Grill Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #7 on: March 16, 2011, 03:00:15 PM »
DKM,

Following up on my last post, I scaled down the 12” pepperoni deep-dish pizza discussed in my last post to 10” to see if the 10” numbers would match the actual 10” pepperoni deep-dish pizza described at the Uno’s website, even after taking into account weight losses during baking. To go through this exercise, I had to determine the amounts of cheeses, sauce and pepperoni on a per square inch basis.

With respect to the pizza sauce described in the video, I had to convert it to a weight inasmuch as the video does not give the weight of the pizza sauce used to make the 12” size. However, 1 ˝ cups of ground tomatoes should weigh around 13.96 ounces. Adding 2 tablespoons of grated Romano cheese (0.353 ounces), one teaspoon ground oregano (0.071 ounces), and one teaspoon ground basil (0.0353 ounces) gives us a total sauce weight of 14.43 ounces. This value comes to 14.43/(3.14159 x 6 x 6) = 0.1276 ounces of sauce per square inch. That is the loading factor for the sauce. Scaling that to a 10” size pizza, gives us 10.02 ounces of pizza sauce (3.14159 x 5 x 5 x 0.1276).

For the cheeses, the loading factor for the 12” size is 10/(3.14159 x 6 x 6) = 0.08842 ounces per square inch. Scaling that to the 10” size gives us 6.94 ounces of cheeses. For the pepperoni, the loading factor for the 12” size is 2/(3.14159 x 6 x 6) = 0.0177 ounces per square inches. Scaling that to the 10” size gives us 1.39 ounces of pepperoni.

For the dough weight for the 10” size, I used the previously mentioned thickness factor of 0.13149 in the deep-dish dough calculating tool but using a 10” straight-sided pan and keeping the depth of the dough in the pan at 1 ˝”. That yielded a dough weight of 15.49 ounces. So, if my math is correct, with a total dough weight of 15.49 ounces, 6.95 ounces of total cheese, 10.02 ounces of pizza sauce, and 1.39 ounces of pepperoni, the total unbaked weight of a 10” deep-dish pepperoni pizza using the earlier posted dough formulation should be about 33.85 ounces. By contrast, according to the nutrition data at the Uno’s website, a fully baked 10” Uno’s pepperoni deep-dish pizza should weigh 38.73 ounces (6 x 183g/28.35). If one accounts for some weight loss during bakng, the unbaked 10” pizza is perhaps closer to 40-42 ounces. This discrepancy suggests that the deep-dish pizzas made at an Uno’s store is not assembled in the same way as shown in the video, at least from the standpoint of weights of ingredients. For example, looking at just the cholesterol numbers (240mg) for the 10” Uno’s pepperoni deep-dish pizza, which come only from the LMPS cheese and the pepperoni, suggests that Uno’s uses much more cheese in their stores than as shown in the video. If Uno’s uses a deeper deep-dish pan and a dough that is higher in the pan, that can also affect the final numbers but that shouldn't affect the cholesterol numbers.

Peter

Offline FLAVORMAN

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 71
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Uno's Chicago Grill Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #8 on: March 16, 2011, 03:31:09 PM »

Why is the amount of yeast (ADY) so important? for a 14 inch I have learned from the site 7 grams is sufficient...If you use the total package of yeast what is the negative effect...thanks

Offline DKM

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1684
  • Age: 45
  • Location: Texas
  • Chicago - Now that's Pizza!
    • The Emperor.net
Re: Uno's Chicago Grill Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2011, 07:17:05 PM »
DKM,

I have presented below my attempt at converting the Uno’s dough recipe to baker’s percent format.

Thank you, sir.  As is the normal case, you did a excellent job.
I'm on too many of these boards


Offline Tampa

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 1257
Re: Uno's Chicago Grill Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #10 on: March 17, 2011, 11:44:32 AM »
Peter, your continuing level of support is amazing.
Dave

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21194
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Uno's Chicago Grill Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #11 on: March 17, 2011, 01:03:57 PM »
Dave,

Thank you. That is actually the kind of analytical/intellectual exercise I enjoy. It tests a lot of what you know about pizza making but in one place, and you still learn something from the exercise.

Peter

Offline DKM

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1684
  • Age: 45
  • Location: Texas
  • Chicago - Now that's Pizza!
    • The Emperor.net
Re: Uno's Chicago Grill Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #12 on: March 17, 2011, 02:02:37 PM »
Why is the amount of yeast (ADY) so important? for a 14 inch I have learned from the site 7 grams is sufficient...If you use the total package of yeast what is the negative effect...thanks

The amount of yeast affects serveral things from flavor, rise time, and overall life cycle of the dough.

One small example a slow rise room temp dough needs less yeast and will have a longer life cycle.  If you put in more yeast the dough will rise faster but its life cycle will be shorter.
I'm on too many of these boards

Offline c0mpl3x

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 996
  • Age: 27
  • Location: north of pittsburgh PA
  • crumb bubbles!
Re: Uno's Chicago Grill Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #13 on: March 17, 2011, 11:46:07 PM »
don't forget the coconut oil used to coat the pans with
Hotdogs kill more people than sharks do, yearly.

Offline vcb

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 427
  • Location: Chicago
    • Real Deep Dish
Re: Uno's Chicago Grill Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #14 on: March 18, 2011, 11:30:49 AM »
-- Ed Heller -aka- VCBurger -- Real Deep Dish - Deep Dish 101
http://www.realdeepdish.com/
http://facebook.com/realdeepdish/
http://virtualcheeseblogger.com/

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21194
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Uno's Chicago Grill Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #15 on: March 18, 2011, 12:04:45 PM »
Ed,

Thank you for that link. There were some liberties taken with the sauce and cheese in the video, but there is an important piece of information that was provided that was not given in the original recipe that DKM posted, and that is the total dough weight of 20 ounces. That will change the thickness factor somewhat and also the baker's percents for the ingredients (other than the flour, which is always 100%). Later today, I will rework the numbers for the dough formulation and the thickness factor. Those changes won't materially affect my comments in Reply 7 above.

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21194
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Uno's Chicago Grill Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #16 on: March 18, 2011, 04:22:18 PM »
I redid the math calculations and, using the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html, I have set forth below the latest revision of the Uno's deep-dish dough recipe based on a total dough weight of 20 ounces. Also, this time, I actually weighed out 3/4 cup of water. In my case, since I do not have a 3/4-cup metal measuring cup as appears is used in the video that DKM referenced, I simultaneously tared out a 1/2-cup metal measuring cup and a 1/4-cup metal measuring cup on my digital scale and filled them with water to the point where I could carry the measuring cups without spilling the water. I did this two times and got the same weight, 162 grams, or 5.72 ounces. Then, using that number, along with the weights I previously calculated for the salt, sugar, ADY, corn oil and olive oil, I calculated that the weight of the flour used in the recipe is 11.12 ounces. The impact of the revised dough formulation is that there was a decrease in hydration from 52.32% to 51.38%. My numbers may still be a bit off because of the way that I weighed out the formula water but they should be good enough for our purposes, and there is still the opportunity to tweak the values of flour and water during preparation of the dough. To get a more accurate water number, I would need to have a 3/4-cup metal measuring cup.

I also used the deep-dish dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/dd_calculator.html to recalculate the thickness factor. This time, I got a thickness factor value of 0.0.12485. That is the value that should be used in the deep-dish dough calculating tool for scaling to other pizza sizes, pan shapes, depths, etc.

The revised Uno's recipe is as follows:

Rev 1 of the Uno’s Deep-Dish Dough Recipe
All-Purpose Flour (100%):
Water (51.3797%):
ADY (2.24786%):
Salt (3.54038%):
Olive Oil (4.27007%):
Corn Oil (17.1266%):
Sugar (1.26443%):
Total (179.82904%):
315.3 g  |  11.12 oz | 0.7 lbs
162 g  |  5.71 oz | 0.36 lbs
7.09 g | 0.25 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.88 tsp | 0.63 tbsp
11.16 g | 0.39 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2 tsp | 0.67 tbsp
13.46 g | 0.47 oz | 0.03 lbs | 2.99 tsp | 1 tbsp
54 g | 1.9 oz | 0.12 lbs | 4 tbsp | 0.25 cups
3.99 g | 0.14 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1 tsp | 0.33 tbsp
567 g | 20 oz | 1.25 lbs | TF = N/A
Note: Nominal thickness factor for use in the deep-dish dough calculating tool = 0.12485; total oil baker's percent = 21.40%; no bowl residue compensation factor

As noted above, I did not use a bowl residue compensation factor. In practice, if using a standard home stand mixer, I would use a bowl residue compensation of 1.5%. In the above example, it is quite possible that the total dough weight will slightly exceed 20 ounces when using the bowl residue compensation. If so, I would use the scale to scale the dough ball weight down to 20 ounces.

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21194
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Uno's Chicago Grill Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #17 on: March 18, 2011, 07:28:56 PM »
I went back to the original video and it looks like the measuring cup used for the water is a one-cup measuring cup with 3/4 cup of water in it. Out of curiosity, I went back to my digital scale, tared out a one-cup measuring cup, and casually added 1/2 cup of water from a metal 1/2-cup measuring cup and 1/4 cup of water from a 1/2-cup metal measuring cup. I did not try to fill the 1/2- and 1/4-cup measuring cups to the absolute top and to examine their minisci. The result is that the weight of water was pretty close to what I posted in my last reply. In reality, the amount of water can have several possible weight values, depending on what measuring cups are used and how casual or precise one is in filling the measuring cups.

Peter

Offline BTB

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 971
  • Location: Tampa Bay, FL & S.W. Mich. areas
Re: Uno's Chicago Grill Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #18 on: March 19, 2011, 10:07:57 AM »
I know this is difficult to understand by many, but the pizza served at the disreputed Uno's Chicago Grill has few resemblances to the pizza served (at least originally served) at the famous Uno's and Due's in Chicago across the street from the Medina Temple where I dined at many, many dozens of times before and after my classes at Loyola there in Chicago.  It's often been joked that the only similarity between the two styles of pizzas is that they are both round!
 
The formerly great original Uno's (and Due's) and its former owners (including Ike Sewell) entered into a somewhat peculiar business relationship years ago with the Boston Uno's Company.  As past managers had told me, that did not include the pizza recipe as the Boston Uno's did not think that was anything special and thought that they could easily make a pizza every bit as good.  Time has proven that to be a big mistake for them (didn't they file for bankruptcy?).  While they got "rights" to the business name and logo, their pizza was a flop and they had to re-configure their business model and included ribs, hamburgers, steaks, etc. on their menu as the quality of their pizzas were not bringing in the customers.  The original Uno's and Due's to this day serve basically only pizzas and none of the other "stuff."  But whatever.
 
Peter's latest formulation in Reply #16 above, which is based on a chef for the Uno's Chicago Grill, is "in the ball park" for Chicago Style Deep Dish pizza.  I seriously doubt that the chef had the real original recipe that dated back to 1943 and such statement was probably a big generalization in my estimation (if not an outright exaggeration). The water is within the range of 45 to 50% which I think is good, altho I'm finding more success with hydration in the low end of that range. ADY seems a little high, but as DKM indicated, it depends upon a number of variables (flavor, rise time, and overall life cycle of the dough).  Salt seems a bit high.  Oil and sugar amounts seem to be in the ball park, tho.
 
As I don't like a thick rim (i.e., "Cornicione") on a Chicago deep dish pizza, as was shown in the photograph along with the linked recipe, I would cut back considerably on the ADY.  While the thick rim would be typical at a Uno's Chicago Grill, it would not have been so at the original Uno's and Due's.  Those who recall seeing the Food War's TV program last year (or similar TV show) will remember seeing that in their kitchen procedure, original Uno's tightly pressed and crimped the edge of the pizza dough against the walls of the deep dish pizza pan, similar to what Malnati's does.
 
Am anxious to hear of and see pictures of others trials and experiments with this.
 
                                                                                --BTB                           :D
                    
« Last Edit: March 19, 2011, 11:26:04 AM by BTB »

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21194
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Uno's Chicago Grill Deep Dish Pizza
« Reply #19 on: March 19, 2011, 12:13:45 PM »
BTB,

No doubt you noted that the thickness factor I calculated is almost exactly what you use for your Malnati's semolina clone if I am not mistaken.

Peter


 

pizzapan