Author Topic: High Gluten Flour in a grocery store?  (Read 13317 times)

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Online Pete-zza

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Re: High Gluten Flour in a grocery store?
« Reply #40 on: January 24, 2006, 04:19:37 PM »
ihavezippers,

Can you tell me which specific recipe you were following? Things got disjointed when Randy’s original recipe was removed, and all that was left were pieces here and there. And, along the way, I started making thin versions of Randy’s American style based on a baker’s percent version that I came up with from Randy’s recipe. So, it would be easy for you to be confused if you haven’t followed the history of Randy’s recipe and its many iterations on the forum.

I am the one who uses the “system” of cups (c.), tablespoons (T.) and teaspoons (t.) that you referenced in your last post. I do this for the benefit of those who do not have digital scales. For the flour and water in my formulations, I weigh those ingredients and then convert them to volumes (cups, tablespoons and teaspoons). To use volumes to reproduce what I have done, you have to understand my methodology for measuring out volumes. You are new to the forum and perhaps haven't read how I do it and how I intend others to do it. So, for your benefit, here it is.

What I do to measure out volumes of flour is to start by stirring the flour in the bag of flour to loosen the flour. I then take an ordinary kitchen tablespoon and scoop flour into a measuring cup until it is slightly overfilled. I don’t shake or tamp the measuring cup. I then level off the top of the measuring cup with the flat edge of a knife. I do the same thing for measuring spoons. So, when I say to use 2 cups plus 3 tablespoons plus 1/2 teaspoon of flour, I intend that you measure them out just the way I described above. If you just dip the measuring cup and measuring spoons into the bag of flour, you most likely come out with different amounts of flour. Depending on whether you use a light hand or heavy hand in scooping out flour, or whether the flour is lightly packed or loosely packed, it can weigh more or less than what I intend. Even my system is not perfect, but it is the closest I know of for you to get close to the weights I use if you don’t have a scale and use volumes.

Although I don’t know which exact recipe you followed, I am not surprised that you got good results anyway. I have always said that Randy’s American style dough (and my thin versions) are almost foolproof. If you take to this pizza making thing, you may want to invest in a decent digital scale at some point. It will help you if you want to make doughs from recipes where the ingredients, and particularly the flour and water, are stated in weights. For the rest of the ingredients, like salt, yeast, sugar, and oil, volumes will usually suffice.

I don’t know if it will help, but recently I stumbled across another version of Randy’s American style dough at a Little Caesar’s thread at Reply #1 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1515.0.html. The recipe is different than the ones I have been using for the thin versions, but it is very close to the original recipe and at least all the instructions seem to be in one place.

Peter


Offline ihavezippers

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Re: High Gluten Flour in a grocery store?
« Reply #41 on: January 24, 2006, 04:50:33 PM »
Hey Peter, the Randy's recipe I used was one I am almost sure that you referenced to me...anyhow, it doesn't matter.  I understand the measurements now.  I guess I just need to find a procedural guide, but I am sure if I look closely enough through old posts, one will surface.  If you don't mind sharing, please post.

I had seen your comments earlier about using a knife to level off the measurements, and was doing that...I will try stirring the flour pre-withdrawal this time.  Thanks

One thing I momentarily struggled with was that I am using a pan for my pizzas...I don't have a pizza stone, let alone a pizza screen, or any of these other fantastic gizmos you pros have.  I usually make a deep dish pizza, about 2 or 3 inches deep and maybe 12 across.  I have a regular flat pizza pan as well.  As I previously mentioned, though, the crust turned out fantastic...the sauce almost made my wife and I sick, but that can be simply remedied by some other fantastic sauce recipe on this site (I plan to try the Little Caesar's sauce this Friday).

Online Pete-zza

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Re: High Gluten Flour in a grocery store?
« Reply #42 on: January 24, 2006, 05:37:03 PM »
ihavezippers,

Unfortunately, not all recipes conform to a single methodology for making doughs, and each person has his or her own preferred way of making the doughs. However, you might find this thread of value inasmuch as it is directed to some of the basics of making doughs, in this instance, a NY style: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2223.0.html. The techniques described there can be applied to Randy's formulation or the thin version that you apparently tried. For instance, the honey and sugar could be dissolved in the water along with the salt. Otherwise, the dough processing would be pretty much as described at the abovereferenced thread. However, if you want the true experience from practicing Randy's recipe, you can simply follow his instructions. You might even start, as I did, with the original recipe that makes a dough and resulting crust that is thicker than the ones I made. I was looking for more of a NY thin style version of Randy's recipe. I have liked all of the versions. In due course, you may want to invest in a few pizza screens. They are perfect for Randy's recipes, and they are very inexpensive (less than $4 for a 14- to16-inch screen).

Peter

Offline fredric100

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Re: High Gluten Flour in a grocery store?
« Reply #43 on: March 23, 2011, 11:39:37 PM »
Regarding the original question about where to buy high-gluten flour in the Seattle area:  today I bought a 50-pound bag of King Arthur's Sir Lancelot high-gluten flour at Dawn baking supply (wholesale supplier) in Renton.  The 50-pound bag cost $27.90.  They were very friendly and helpful.  They distribute King Arthur products nationally, so I encourage you to check their other locations as well.

Dawn Food Products Inc.:
www(dot)dawnfoods(dot)com -> Distribution -> Locations

The Flour Sack also sells Sir Lancelot online, but The Flour Sack worked out to about twice the price, including the shipping.

The Flour Sack:
www(dot)floursack(dot)com


 

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