Author Topic: Dough Containers - Can you see any reason why these would not work well?  (Read 241 times)

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Offline mitchjg

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I usually use Glad type round containers (different brand maybe) to proof my dough balls, around 9 ounces each.  Sometimes, I use plastic bread bags, per Tom Lehman's advice.

I am thinking of giving these a try:
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00EA0P9RK/?tag=pmak-20

The reason is that they are less than 3" in height while the usual containers are 3.5.  According to the Q&A on Amazon, they are about 2 or 2 1/4 inches in height without the lid.  5 1/2 inches in diameter on the bottom and 7 1/4 across the top.  They are supposed to be 32 ounce containers.

This matters in how well things stack up in my wine fridge/beverage center due to the spacing of the shelves.  And, due to poor / uneven temperature control, I may end up junking the one I have and installing a new model.  The shelf spacing on the new one looks like it is 3 1/8.

So, I am thinking of testing these out with my existing setup to see if I can make it work and/or to ensure that things will fit well if I end up with the new one.

Does anyone see a reason why these would not work well as proofing containers in the fridge for dough balls?

Thanks!
Mitch


Offline TXCraig1

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Between cheap plastic food bags and my wood boxes. I doubt I'll ever use tubs again.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline mitchjg

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Between cheap plastic food bags and my wood boxes. I doubt I'll ever use tubs again.

As Tom describes, I brush the dough balls with oil before putting in the plastic food bag.  I have not tried Pam or letting them go commando.  Do you oil them?

BTW, the one thing I see that could annoy me about the ones I just posted is you cannot see the develop of the dough from the bottom to see how "holey" it is.
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 06:17:39 PM by mitchjg »
Mitch

Offline TXCraig1

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I've been spraying a bit of crisco spray in the bags. I cut the bag open, and the ball rolls gently out. I got turned off the containers when I started to notice how much damage they do to the structure of the bottom of the dough as the pull free from the container when falling out. I don't think that is a problem for shorter fermentations or CF however.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline Bill/SFNM

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I got turned off the containers when I started to notice how much damage they do to the structure of the bottom of the dough as the pull free from the container when falling out. I don't think that is a problem for shorter fermentations or CF however.

Craig, not sure I understand "structural damage". Here is a 2-day dough, no oil. What do you think?


Offline David Esq.

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As Tom describes, I brush the dough balls with oil before putting in the plastic food bag.  I have not tried Pam or letting them go commando.  Do you oil them?

BTW, the one thing I see that could annoy me about the ones I just posted is you cannot see the develop of the dough from the bottom to see how "holey" it is.
Put the dough on the lid and cover it with the bottom.

Offline mitchjg

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Craig, not sure I understand "structural damage". Here is a 2-day dough, no oil. What do you think?



Bill:

Is that pan aluminum?  I have a stacking set of 3 with a lid made out of aluminum.  It has been at least 2 years since I tried using them.  I kept getting the black oxidation on the aluminum and some sticking.  I am wondering what magic you used.  ???
Mitch

Offline mitchjg

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Put the dough on the lid and cover it with the bottom.

I have seen that option used before.  I have been rejecting it because, although I would see the bottom development, I would not see the overall rise ("doubling", etc.)

I suspect I will use my bread bags again next time.  Last week, I had several doughs in bags and I brushed them with oil to store and then turned the bags inside out to flip them onto the counter.  It worked well but I think that a shot of spray when storing and cutting the bag open to remove the balls, as Craig described, will work even better.  What I like about the bread bags is the space saving aspect and not having the sink and dishwasher fill up with containers when I am making a lot of dough.  The cool down may be faster, too.
« Last Edit: Today at 03:04:12 PM by mitchjg »
Mitch

Offline dineomite

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Quote
not having the sink and dishwasher fill up with containers

My wife put her foot down and said no more tubs for dough.  ^^^


Offline David Esq.

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You only make one dough ball? Do one one way and the other the other. You can see tops and bottoms then.

Offline mitchjg

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You only make one dough ball? Do one one way and the other the other. You can see tops and bottoms then.
I'll pass on that.
Mitch

Offline bradtri

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Mitch,
   I like the lower profile on these.  My gladware containers are right at 3" high and I feel that I'm always wasting vertical space in the container and also the refrigerator.  Do you think the 24 oz containers from your link might be big enough for your doughballs? 

   Having said that, I only use the gladware containers if I'm just doing a few pizzas because they just don't fit in the dishwasher well.  I too have gone to the food bags approach.  I just grab the dough ball on the bottom of the bag and push it through the opening to invert the bag and the ball comes right out.

   I'm curious what method you and others use for oiling their dough balls?  I've taken to coating a 1/2 sheet pan with oil and setting the dough balls in there as I make them so that the bottoms of the dough balls get coated.  Then, when I am all done, I spray the whole batch with Pam and put them in the bags.  Seems to expedite the process and be a bit less messy.  Same thing with the Gladware containers, I spray the inside of the container before putting the dough balls in and then come back and spray the tops at the end.

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Bill:

Is that pan aluminum?  I have a stacking set of 3 with a lid made out of aluminum.  It has been at least 2 years since I tried using them.  I kept getting the black oxidation on the aluminum and some sticking.  I am wondering what magic you used.  ???

Yes, the kind of aluminum that doesn't get along well at all with automatic dishwasher soaps. These don't go near the dishwasher and are only used for bread, pizza, and ice cream. They never stick with my typical dough hydration levels of 60%-80% , but neither did the plastic ones I used to use.

I've never seen this as an issue of the containers' material or a barrier between the dough and the container to prevent stickiness. For me it is all about dough management. Perhaps overly simplistic, I've always imagined there are two kinds of water in dough: 1) water molecules bound up in the gluten structure and, therefore, not available to bind to the container and 2) free water molecules in suspension with the flour particles that are available to bind with the container or your hands or your peel. Maximizing the water bound up in the gluten structure reduces stickiness, makes the dough easier to work with, and ultimately results in a more pleasing texture. I have no real basis for this model, but keeping it in mind has helped me improve all of my breads - especially being able to handle 70%+ dough with ease.     

Offline mitchjg

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Bill:

I have threatened myself with this before and now you have tempted me to rummage in the garage to find these pans for which a disdain had developed.   It may take more than maintaining a mental model for this mortal to avoid sticking - something like the Force or PAM (don't cringe too much.  :o )

I will give it a try but won't bet the next batch on it!


Mitch

Offline mitchjg

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bradtri:

Good question on the 24 ounce containers.  The containers I use are even taller than that, something like 3 1/2 inches.  It is a waste of space and that is one of the problems I was pondering.  I have never drawn a line on the container and measured but I do not think the dough balls (mine are 9 ounces) ever go past 1/2 of the Glassware containers which, IIRC, are 6 cups.  So, I think 24 ounces is borderline and possibly a bridge too far.  That is why I was doing some Amazon searching for 4 cup containers and came across the ones I posted in the first post.  I do think there are lots of 4 cup options out there but I was, as you said, seeking a low profile.

Regarding the oiling, I was actually using a silicone brush and lightly brushing the dough balls, top and bottom, with neutral oil (canola).  I do not like doing it, way too messy and too easy to have too much oil involved.  I think your approach reduces that potential but also sounds messy.  That is why my little light bulb lit up when I saw Craig say he sprayed the inside of the bag and not the dough ball itself.

When I do use containers, I settled on PAM quite awhile ago as my best approach to minimize oiling, no mess and never sticking (it has got to be the lecithin).  I only lightly/quickly spray the container bottom and have never had a need to spray the top of the dough ball.

This thread may be interesting to you: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=34523.msg343543#msg343543  Note that when you get to reply 21 you will see that I finalized my research (at least for the time being) on 2 approaches that worked well, one of them being PAM.  You will see the other if you go there....... :P

Mitch

Offline invertedisdead

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I usually just use rice flour.