Author Topic: Quick Rustic Pizza  (Read 3129 times)

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Online tinroofrusted

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Quick Rustic Pizza
« on: April 17, 2011, 06:50:14 PM »
Hi fellow pizza and focaccia lovers,  

I'm not exactly sure where this post should be located, but I picked the focaccia sub-forum because this pizza is closer to focaccia than anything else. But it does have sauce on it so maybe it should be in general pizza making.  Anyway, this morning I mixed up a batch of rustic pizza dough using the recipe located here:
http://sites.google.com/site/hollosyt/quickrusticciabattapizza

The recipe is:
    * 250 g Bread Flour (All Purpose will also work in a pinch)
    * 1 cup water
    * 1 tsp yeast
    * 7 g salt

This is a very wet dough that is usually used for ciabatta bread.  The dough is very easy to make. You just combine the ingredients, whir it around in the mixer or food processor for awhile (ten minutes in the mixer, or (as in my case) a minute or so in the food processor), and then place it in a container and let it triple in bulk. When that has happened (about 2 hours, or in my case about  3 hours), you dump it out on a well floured counter, shape it as best you can, and then transfer it to a piece of oiled parchment paper, top it with whatever you like, and put it in the oven (preheated to 500F).

I topped it with some tomato sauce, olive oil, house made pancetta, and some onions. Per the instructions of the recipe, I didn't add the mozzarella cheese until about six minutes into the bake, when the crust was just starting to brown a bit.  Total baking time was about 14 minutes.  

This dough is nearly impossible to shape, as you can see from my pictures.  You just do the best you can. So it is kind of a "bruto ma buono" type of pizza.  The flavor of the dough is fantastic.  Crispy on the bottom, light and pillowy on top.  Really worth doing.  

I did have a small modification of the recipe shown in the link.  I did a series of "turns" during the first hour and a half, every 15 minutes, grabbing the dough with a wet hand, stretching it up, and back down over it self twice. This really helped develop the gluten, and I would recommend it to you. 

« Last Edit: April 17, 2011, 06:57:33 PM by tinroofrusted »


buceriasdon

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Re: Quick Rustic Pizza
« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2011, 07:21:51 PM »
As I don't have parchment paper so I form the dough into an oiled pan, bake untill just firm enough to finish baking on the tile. I agree it is very tasty and tender pizza. Recent thread:     http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,13584.new.html#new
Don
« Last Edit: April 17, 2011, 07:23:50 PM by buceriasdon »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Quick Rustic Pizza
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2011, 07:30:00 PM »
tinroofrusted,

You might also check out the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8539.0/topicseen.html;.

Peter

Online tinroofrusted

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Re: Quick Rustic Pizza
« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2011, 07:50:00 PM »
Don, I'm wondering if it is really necessary to mix this dough.  Given the very high hydration, I would think that you could just dump the ingredients in a bowl, stir them up with a wooden spoon, do a few folds over a couple of hours, and come up with a very nicely formed dough. What do you think?  

Peter and Don, thanks very much for the links to the other threads about this. I had seen them but sort of lost track.  The conversion to weights is good to have too. 

buceriasdon

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Re: Quick Rustic Pizza
« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2011, 07:54:32 PM »
I do a number of stretch and folds as I have access to only 10% protein flours and need the added gluten buildup. My next one will be a two day cold ferment and see if that helps also. Your pizzza looks marvelos.
Don

buceriasdon

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Re: Quick Rustic Pizza
« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2011, 03:16:33 PM »
tinroofrusted, I did a mix in my food processor this morning and just removed it from the fridge (six hours chilled) to sit out until risen. More in a couple of hours. Several blogs such as :  http://www.lifehack.org/articles/lifehack/kitchen-hack-one-minute-ciabatta-bread.html
use no kneading what so ever, so we shall see.
Don

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Re: Quick Rustic Pizza
« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2011, 03:54:30 PM »
Don, post some photos if you can.  I'm thinking of trying this again but changing it a bit as follows:

500 grams Flour
470 grams cold water
1/4 tsp yeast
1.25 tsp salt

I would use cold water and less yeast to slow the fermentation. I would start it in the evening, do the turns every 15 minutes for 1.5 hours to help the gluten develop, then just leave it on the counter overnight and see how it rises by morning.  I would think that by mid-morning of the next day it should be very well risen. 

TinRoof

buceriasdon

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Re: Quick Rustic Pizza
« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2011, 06:10:27 PM »
tinroofrusted, No photos as it was just too ugly a mess today. I haven't had such a disaster in a long time. Others may get a 95% no knead to work for them, but not for me. :( The rim baked fine, but I used a chunky tomato sauce I made and the middle didn't bake and tore when I attempted to get it off the pan. What a mess. I think another mistake, besides too much sauce, was using oil and not flour in the pan.  What I did notice about the rim was my air bubbles were not as large or as many of them as earlier pizzas, indicating to me I did not have the gluten built up enough. The rise just wasn't there. It's back to stretch and folds for the low protein flour I have. So frustrating not having decent flour to use. I may try a heavy flour coating on aluminum foil on my peel next.
Don

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Re: Quick Rustic Pizza
« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2011, 08:19:57 PM »
Don, 

Sorry to hear about your misfortune. Part of the process I guess. The guy who wrote the recipe did say "IF you want sauce, you're on your own." Maybe that's what he was referring to.  I remember many years ago, when I first started making pizza, and before I really knew what I was doing, I used to totally screw up transferring the pizza from the peel to the stone. I would get these monstrosities where the pizza was folded over itself, with ingredients all over the place, on a blistering hot stone. "What a mess!" as you so succinctly said yourself.  It makes me glad that I've gotten a bit better and handling the peel! No peel issues here, but sticking is a problem. 

If you can come across some parchment paper I found that method pretty easy to deal with. The dough is still impossible to handle, but with a good amount of floor when you pour it out onto the work surface you can do a semblance of a shaping and then get it stretched out on the parchment paper. (I also put a bit of semolina flour on the parchment paper in addition to using spray oil on it.)

Reading this over I wonder if it's really worth the trouble!  After all, our normal hydration pizzas are really good too!  But this is kind of a fun change of pace and the flavor really was good.  I have a piece of it left over in the fridge and I think I will eat it when I go home tonight.  Did the part of yours that cooked up OK taste good? 

Regards, 

TinRoof

buceriasdon

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Re: Quick Rustic Pizza
« Reply #9 on: April 23, 2011, 07:44:57 PM »


Offline mmac06

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Re: Quick Rustic Pizza
« Reply #10 on: July 19, 2011, 04:52:48 PM »
I made this Rustic Ciabatta Pizza last night and thought I'd post my results. I don't have a mixer, which made the high hydration a little challenging. I grabbed a wooden spoon and stirred the hell out of the dough for a good 17 minutes or so. It was definitely more like a thick batter as others have indicated. I wasn't able to get the gluten development I could have with a mixer, so I wasn't sure how it would turn out. I glopped it out on some lightly oiled parchment paper, "shaped" it (kind of pushed it around), and dressed it with fresh moz. tomatoes and basil. I was nervous that it wouldn't turn out well because of how wet it was (just a glob of sloppy dough). It cooked on a stone on the paper at about 525-550F for 12 minutes or so. The crust was great and got some good coloration too! It didn't get the oven spring I had hoped for, which I'm guessing is due to the lack of mixer and therefor gluten. It was still fairly airy and light though. This was a great emergency dough!

(sorry the picture is a little blurry -- camera phone!)

Online tinroofrusted

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Re: Quick Rustic Pizza
« Reply #11 on: July 19, 2011, 06:13:12 PM »
Glad you liked it  mmac06.  I'm thinking about whipping up a batch of that for dinner tonight! 

Regards,

TinRoof

Offline mmac06

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Re: Quick Rustic Pizza
« Reply #12 on: July 20, 2011, 05:36:05 PM »
Glad you liked it  mmac06.  I'm thinking about whipping up a batch of that for dinner tonight!  

Regards,
TinRoof

That would be great. Have you tried a slow/cold fermentation with this dough? Doesn't that help with the gluten development? That might be a good alternative for me to try since I don't have a mixer.
« Last Edit: July 20, 2011, 05:41:41 PM by mmac06 »


 

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