Author Topic: Doner Kebab  (Read 398 times)

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Offline Reek

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Doner Kebab
« on: February 03, 2015, 08:59:49 PM »
Any pro's out there? looking for a killer marinade and any meaty tips a gyro fiend might need. Mmmmmmmm gyros.

Online nick57

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Re: Doner Kebab
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2015, 10:08:04 PM »
 These are the two recipes I use. I kind of use some of both of them to make my gyro meat. I am a crazy Greek and I like both recipes, but I like the first one better for the procedure. I use less lamb than called for, I go with a 50/50 mixture of the meat. I have used more lamb, and if you like a stronger flavor go for that. Real Greek Gyros use pork and not lamb. One caveate, I like American Gyros, better than in Athens. In the second method, he cooks the meat in the bread pan. I don't care for that. I form the meat in the pan, then remove it. That way it gets a nice crust on the outside. I cut thin slices and place them under the broiler to crisp up the one side. It ends up being pretty close to what you would get in a Gyro stand.


Ingredients
      For the meat:
      1 pound ground lamb (or ground 85% lean ground beef—see note)
      2 teaspoons kosher salt (or 1 teaspoon table salt)
      1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
      2 tablespoons picked fresh oregano leaves (or 1/2 teaspoon dried)
      1/2 onion, cut into 1-inch chunks
      1 clove garlic, sliced
      3 ounces slab bacon (or about 5 slices sliced bacon), cut into 1-inch pieces
      For the yogurt sauce:
      3/4 cup plain, unsweetened yogurt
      1/4 cup mayonnaise
      1 clove garlic, minced on microplane
      2 teaspoons juice from 1 lemon
      2 tablespoons chopped parsley or mint
      To serve:
      4 pieces soft, hand-pulled-style pita (not pocket pita)
      Chopped fresh tomato
      Finely sliced onion
      Cubed peeled seeded cucumber
      Hot sauce
Procedures
   1.   1

Combine lamb, salt, pepper, and oregano in medium bowl. Mix with hands until homogeneous. Cover and refrigerate at least 1 hour or up to over night. Meanwhile, place yogurt in fine-mesh strainer set over small bowl. Allow to drain in refrigerator for 1 hour. Adjust oven rack to middle position and preheat oven to 300°F. Place cold mixture in bowl of food processor with onion, garlic, and bacon. Process until smooth puree is formed, about 1 minute total, scraping down sides with rubber spatula as necessary.


   2.   2

Line rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil. With moist hands, form meat mixture into rectangle about 1 1/2 inches high, 8-inches long, and 5-inches wide. Bake until center of loaf reads 155°F on an instant read thermometer, about 30 minutes. Allow loaf to rest at room temperature for fifteen minutes (or refrigerate for up to a week—see note)


   3.   3

Meanwhile, make sauce. Combine strained yogurt, mayonnaise, garlic, lemon juice, and parsley and stir to combine. Season to taste with salt. Refrigerate, covered, until ready to use.


   4.   4

Adjust broiler rack to highest position (about 1 1/2 to 2 inches from broiler element) and preheat broiler. Slice loaf crosswise into 1/8th to 1/4-inch strips (each strip should be about 5-inches long and 1 1/2 inches wide). Lay strips on rimmed baking sheet lined with aluminum foil and broil until edges are brown and crispy, about 2 minutes. Tent with aluminum foil. Warm bread by placing on rimmed baking sheet and broiling until soft and pliant, about 45 seconds per side.


   5.   5

Spread 1/4 cup of sauce over each piece of bread. Divide meat evenly between sandwiches. Top as desired, wrap with foil, and serve.


Recipe #2
1 medium onion, finely chopped or shredded
2 pounds ground lamb
1 tablespoon finely minced garlic
1 tablespoon dried marjoram
1 tablespoon dried ground rosemary
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Tzatziki Sauce, recipe follows

Process the onion in a food processor for 10 to 15 seconds and turn out into the center of a tea towel. Gather up the ends of the towel and squeeze until almost all of the juice is removed. Discard juice.

Return the onion to the food processor and add the lamb, garlic, marjoram, rosemary, salt, and pepper and process until it is a fine paste, approximately 1 minute. Stop the processor as needed to scrape down sides of bowl.

To cook in the oven as a meatloaf, proceed as follows:
Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F.

Place the mixture into a loaf pan, making sure to press into the sides of the pan. Place the loaf pan into a water bath and bake for 60 to 75 minutes or until the mixture reaches 165 to 170 degrees F. Remove from the oven and drain off any fat. Place the loaf pan on a cooling rack and place a brick wrapped in aluminum foil directly on the surface of the meat and allow to sit for 15 to 20 minutes, until the internal temperature reaches 175 degrees F. Slice and serve on pita bread with tzatziki sauce, chopped onion, tomatoes and feta cheese.

To cook on a rotisserie, proceed as follows:
Form the meat mixture into a loaf shape and place on top of 2 overlapping pieces of plastic wrap that are at least 18 inches long. Roll the mixture in the plastic wrap tightly, making sure to remove any air pockets. Once the meat is completely rolled in the wrap, twist the ends of the plastic wrap until the surface of the wrap is tight. Store in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours or up to overnight, to allow the mixture to firm up.

Preheat the grill to high.

Place the meat onto the rotisserie skewer. Place a double-thick piece of aluminum foil folded into a tray directly under the meat to catch any drippings. Cook on high for 15 minutes. Decrease the heat to medium and continue to cook for another 20 to 30 minutes or until the internal temperature of the meat reaches 165 degrees F. Turn off the heat and allow to continue to spin for another 10 to 15 minutes or until the internal temperature reaches 175 degrees. Slice and serve on pita bread with tzatziki sauce, chopped onion, tomatoes, and feta cheese.

Tzatziki Sauce:
16 ounces plain yogurt
1 medium cucumber, peeled, seeded, and finely chopped
Pinch kosher salt
4 cloves garlic, finely minced
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
5 to 6 mint leaves, finely minced

Place the yogurt in a tea towel, gather up the edges, suspend over a bowl, and drain for 2 hours in the refrigerator.

Place the chopped cucumber in a tea towel and squeeze to remove the liquid; discard liquid. In a medium mixing bowl, combine the drained yogurt, cucumber, salt, garlic, olive oil, vinegar, and mint. Serve as a sauce for gyros. Store in the refrigerator in an airtight container for up to a week.

Yield: 1 1/2 cups



Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Doner Kebab
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2015, 11:48:19 PM »


  I was just searching today to see where to go get some for lunch tomorrow. I love this stuff.  :drool:
Have made it at home before too and it turns out surprisingly killah!
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Offline Reek

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Re: Doner Kebab
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2015, 07:46:24 PM »
These are the two recipes I use. I kind of use some of both of them to make my gyro meat. I am a crazy Greek and I like both recipes, but I like the first one better for the procedure. I use less lamb than called for, I go with a 50/50 mixture of the meat. I have used more lamb, and if you like a stronger flavor go for that. Real Greek Gyros use pork and not lamb. One caveate, I like American Gyros, better than in Athens. In the second method, he cooks the meat in the bread pan. I don't care for that. I form the meat in the pan, then remove it. That way it gets a nice crust on the outside. I cut thin slices and place them under the broiler to crisp up the one side. It ends up being pretty close to what you would get in a Gyro stand.


Thanks for the step by step that's huge, Big thanks. This looks WELL worth it.   

Offline Dr_Mike

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Re: Doner Kebab
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2015, 05:25:54 PM »
I've had excellent results with Kenji's gyro recipe from SeriousEats.  http://www.seriouseats.com/2010/06/greek-american-lamb-gyros-homemade-from-scratch-the-food-lab.html  I have put it in a spreadsheet where I put in how many pounds of lamb I have, and it tells me everything else.

I've made Alton Brown's and was not happy with it.  Probably mostly from cooking; baking it in a casserole dish stews it, and my rotisserie attempts fell off and burned.  I have not tried his recipe with my current cooking method.

I will get a couple boneless legs o lamb on sale and make 20 pounds of ground gyro, run through a meat grinder on coarse, then finished in a Quisinart, then I usually plate it in (all of) my glass casserole dishes overnight in the fridge.  The next day, I slice it in squares and vac bag them, then cook SV at 145 for 4 hours (takes a few batches) and freeze.

You now have cooked, pasteurized, gyro meat.  I take it on camping trips where I'll have a griddle available to brown it up.  No worries about raw meat, just cut open the bag, and throw the bag away.  (I mean pack it out of course)  Folks are amazed at my cooking; sure it was a lot of work, but it was a lot of work in a modern kitchen with a dishwasher; that's very different from that much prep in a camp kitchen.

Online nick57

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Re: Doner Kebab
« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2015, 07:18:21 PM »
 Of the two recipes I posted, Kenj's was the first one, and the second was Alton's. I'm in agreement with Dr_Mike on which one is the best. I like Kenji's, but I thought using 100% lamb was a little much. I like lamb, but it was very overpowering at 100%. I like a 50/50 mix of lamb and pork better.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Doner Kebab
« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2015, 07:40:06 PM »


  I once made a loaf from an online recipe and it turned out great....used ground lamb and ground beef.
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Offline FeCheF

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Re: Doner Kebab
« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2015, 09:54:31 PM »
I picked up a boneless butterflied Leg of Lamb a few weeks ago and froze it. It was a managers special 2.57lb for $5.99 , not sure if i want to grind it and mix with beef for hamburgers, gyro's or was also thinking about slicing thin and stacking on the rotisserie skewers for kebabs.