Author Topic: 18 Inch NY Street Style Pie/Slices  (Read 4910 times)

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Offline Darth Pizza

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Re: 18 Inch NY Street Style Pie/Slices
« Reply #20 on: April 26, 2011, 02:43:05 PM »
Awesome! thats the exact crust i want to perfect. and thickness of topping.
can you tell me the best tool to convert your mesurements to cups and tsp TBS mesurements?
thankxz

edit: i just did some conversions...
3.05 bread flour - Cup US
1 cup US
is that correct?
and ony using less than 1/2 teaspoon of IDY?
« Last Edit: April 26, 2011, 03:18:14 PM by Darth Pizza »
May the crust be with you...


Offline chickenparm

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Re: 18 Inch NY Street Style Pie/Slices
« Reply #21 on: April 26, 2011, 09:15:28 PM »
Awesome! thats the exact crust i want to perfect. and thickness of topping.
can you tell me the best tool to convert your mesurements to cups and tsp TBS mesurements?
thankxz

edit: i just did some conversions...
3.05 bread flour - Cup US
1 cup US
is that correct?
and ony using less than 1/2 teaspoon of IDY?

Lord Vader,

I'm not sure about the conversions to cups size.You may be right/close enough on target.

Also,keep in mind,while I made an 18 inch pizza,The recipe is for an 17 inch doughball with a TF of .10

I do this because its very easy for my dough to open up to 18-20 inch in size if I want it to.I could probably make the 18 inch using a 18 inch dough recipe and use a lower TF factor but I just never bothered trying to do it that way much.

Im just comfortable making pizza this way,its a balance for me I found. When I stretch the dough,the center gets thinner but never tears anymore nor gets super thin spots where sauce will leak out through the dough.

The reason I am using less yeast,when my bread machine is done kneading,it has a 1 hour rise rest time.It has a heating element inside that starts to warm the dough up.The dough begins to grow and smooth out.I leave it in for maybe 20-30 minutes,and take it out,lightly ball and oil,and put into the fridge for a 2-3 day cold rise.I never leave the dough to rise past 30 minutes.It will get too big and I would have to use it the same day.

I like to cold ferment the dough since it develops much more flavor that way.

In the past,when I used more yeast,after it was done rising in the warm machine,I got some bad bubbles or over fermenting the next day in the fridge.If you are going to mix the dough,and put it away when done kneading,you can use more yeast or what a recipe may call for.

I had to cut back due to how the machine speeds up the process a little bit.It works well for me.

I did try force lightning once but I ended up destroying the midi chlorians,I mean the yeast in the dough.
 >:D


-Bill

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: 18 Inch NY Street Style Pie/Slices
« Reply #22 on: April 26, 2011, 09:33:54 PM »
can you tell me the best tool to convert your mesurements to cups and tsp TBS mesurements?

edit: i just did some conversions...
3.05 bread flour - Cup US
1 cup US
is that correct?
and ony using less than 1/2 teaspoon of IDY?

Darth Pizza,

You can use the Mass-Volume Conversion Calculator at http://foodsim.unclesalmon.com/ to convert the weight of flour used in Bill's recipe to a volume quantity. I suggest that you use the Textbook flour Measurement Method as described in the calculator, along with the KABF in the pull-down menu. You can also use the same tool to convert the weight of water to a volume measurement. For the rest of the ingredients, you can use the volume quantities given in Bill's recipe.

Peter

Offline Darth Pizza

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Re: 18 Inch NY Street Style Pie/Slices
« Reply #23 on: April 26, 2011, 10:44:39 PM »
chickenparm, thanks. im learning more every day. actually, i just found out that 1 lb = 4 cups of SIFTED flour.
the density of the flour matters. im just gonna get a scale. trying to perfect a pizza with volumectric mesurements just doesnt seem to fly.

Pete-zza thats an awesome tool! but like i said, im grabbing a scale from Amazon. this tool page is very good as well:
http://www.traditionaloven.com/conversions_of_measures/flour_volume_weight.html
May the crust be with you...

Offline chickenparm

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Re: 18 Inch NY Street Style Pie/Slices
« Reply #24 on: April 26, 2011, 11:22:45 PM »
Darth,

I bought a digital scale from Walmart.I basically use it to measure the exact oz for how much water and the exact grams for how much flour.That is the most important to me.

I then,use the measuring spoons,the tsp/tbs etc for other ingredients.It has worked well.I don't weigh all the other dry ingredients or worry about exact measurements on the spoons.I get as close as I can by eye or what I feel looks right on the measuring spoons.My real concern is the flour/water amounts and the scale provides that for me.

To make it simple,I may be repeating myself,for example,if a recipe shows .57 tbs of salt,I just use 1/2 a tbs.

I don't get too anal about those.I wasted too much time in the beginning trying to get it all down to the exact gram or oz for the other ingredients,and it did not make a difference I could tell in the end.

I am not telling you to NOT measure anything else,I'm just saying after all the experiments I did,I found no real differences from the exact amount to the nearest tsp or tbs to matter that much.It took me some time to get comfortable with how my doughs are turning out to do so.You may need to do the same if its all new to you.
 :)


-Bill

Offline Darth Pizza

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Re: 18 Inch NY Street Style Pie/Slices
« Reply #25 on: April 26, 2011, 11:40:07 PM »
thats my plan. yea, i wouldnt use a scale for minor ingredients. just flour, yeast, water. and i round minor ingredients off al the time in non pizza stuff.
i mainly wont go crazy with mesurements. i will when testing initial tests, because i never made a homeade quality pizza before. but once i get the feel for the consistency for a dough and ratios, the scale will get packed away.
May the crust be with you...

Offline chickenparm

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Re: 18 Inch NY Street Style Pie/Slices
« Reply #26 on: April 27, 2011, 12:09:00 AM »
Darth,

Don't put the scale away entirely,keep it on hand and use each time to make sure the flour and water amounts is always what the recipe calls for.As you make different size pies over times,the scale is your friend.

I don't have a photographic memory so I always use it for the basis of my dough recipe and what the amounts call for.The dry ingredients,like sugar,salt,yeast,etc,I don't worry about exact amounts,just get them close enough to the spoon size called for.

Maybe after you get used to ONE recipe you always use,then you can put the scale away and make the same thing every time using measuring cups and spoons,watching the dough by eye to see if it needs a little water or more flour.
 :)









-Bill

Offline Darth Pizza

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Re: 18 Inch NY Street Style Pie/Slices
« Reply #27 on: April 27, 2011, 12:34:26 PM »
true. but i really only want to perfect a specific crust. and once i get good with "the feel" of a doughs state, i can fix any errors by adding water, flour, longer fermenting, etc. not sure yet how to fix a dough that been over yeasted though. mabey with both water & flour, and a shorter fermentation after the fix?
May the crust be with you...

Offline CycloneFlyer

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Re: 18 Inch NY Street Style Pie/Slices
« Reply #28 on: April 28, 2011, 06:13:48 PM »
Hey Bill,

I'm new to this site. What process did you use for mixing/rest/autolyse/kneading, etc. if you don't mind my asking?

Offline chickenparm

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Re: 18 Inch NY Street Style Pie/Slices
« Reply #29 on: April 28, 2011, 07:20:57 PM »
Hey Bill,

I'm new to this site. What process did you use for mixing/rest/autolyse/kneading, etc. if you don't mind my asking?

I Just use a Oster bread machine.Dump in the water,oil ,then the dry ingredients,and let the machine knead it for 30 minutes.I don't do the autolyse nor do I use a starter.I use IDY thats made for bread machines.The machine will knead for 5 minutes,rest for 5,then finish kneading the next 20.It actually works very well for my doughs.

Put away dough ball in fridge for up to 3 days,depending on when I want to use it.
Its usually nearly ready the next day.

My bread machine is small,can knead up to 2 lbs of dough if needed.I usually make one dough ball at a time.

 :)

-Bill


Offline CycloneFlyer

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Re: 18 Inch NY Street Style Pie/Slices
« Reply #30 on: April 28, 2011, 07:33:20 PM »
Thanks so much!

That pizza looks exactly of the type I hope to be able to make, and makes me hungry.

Do you just use a bread machine or do you have other mixers as well?


John

Offline chickenparm

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Re: 18 Inch NY Street Style Pie/Slices
« Reply #31 on: April 28, 2011, 09:04:54 PM »
Thanks so much!

That pizza looks exactly of the type I hope to be able to make, and makes me hungry.

Do you just use a bread machine or do you have other mixers as well?


John

John,

The bread machine is all I use right now.I never owned a mixer before.I was close to purchasing a Bosch Universal they spoke about on here,but I decided to go the cheap route FIRST.It has been a good machine so far for the money,under 60 bucks or less.

Someday I may buy a larger,nicer mixer,but for now,the machine does a great job for me.I tried mixing by hand in the past and never had much success as I do now,with the way the dough turns out.

You're also going to find the folks here very helpful over time as well.I would not have learned as much as I have, if it wasn't for them either.So I'm always happy to share and pay it forward in a sense.

Hope you hang out and stay a while.
 :)



-Bill


 

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