Author Topic: Biscuit-like Crust--Tom Lehmann  (Read 2054 times)

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Online Pete-zza

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Biscuit-like Crust--Tom Lehmann
« on: April 24, 2011, 11:29:32 AM »
I recently saw a thread at the PMQ Think Tank at http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=10222#p70166 in which a member asked how one would try to achieve a biscuit-like crust with a layered characteristic. The question was silent as to the type of pizza that used that type of crust but it struck me that the answer could well apply to the Chicago deep-dish style of pizza. Tom Lehmann posted the following reply (I have edited the reply to limit it to the part that pertains to achieving a layered, biscuit-like crust):

The easiest way to get that layered characteristic is to make your dough in the same manner as you would a biscuit dough, or a pie crust. That is by undermixing. This is a type of crust that we demonstrate at our annual pizza seminar as well as at the NAPICS (Columbus, Ohio pizza show). Put the water in the mixing bowl first, then add the yeast (if using compressed yeast, be sure to suspend it in the water). If using IDY or ADY, be sure to prehydrate it and then add it to the water, add the oil to the water at this time too. Add roughly half of the flour, and then add sugar and salt, then add the remainder of the flour. Mix the ingredients together at low speed for approximately 45 to 75-seconds. The resulting "dough" will have a very "shaggy" appearance. There will be a lot of dry flour present. Think of the way a pie dough of biscuit dough looks, this is roughly what the pizza dough should now be looking like. Remove dough from bowl, and begin pressing it into pucks (just like a pie dough) of a weight several ounces heavier that what your actual dough skin will weigh. Bag or box the dough and allow to hydrate overnight in the cooler. On the following day, pass the dough through a sheeter several times reducing the dough to about 1/8-inch in thickness, trim the dough piece to the correct diameter, dress and bake as normal.

Perhaps our experts on the Chicago deep-dish style might find the above answer useful and might like to test out Tom's instructions. A point that might be noted is that if IDY is used, it should be prehydrated as one would do with ADY. The reason for doing this is because of the short knead time. In fact, in other posts that Tom has entered at the PMQTT, he says that one should prehydrate IDY if the mix/knead time is less than 4 minutes for any reason. In this case, the reason is to avoid excessive gluten development. The mix time might also be shortened for the smaller amount of dough than our members might make as compared with a commercial setting.

Except for the rare member who has a commercial sheeter or roller, I would imagine that using a rolling pin in a home setting would be the way to roll out the skins.

Peter


Offline BTB

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Re: Biscuit-like Crust--Tom Lehmann
« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2011, 08:49:06 AM »
Interesting, Peter.  I most often have that "shaggy" dough ball look as Tom describes after mixing/kneading for a very short time, like 60 seconds.  But I start first mixing all the dry ingredients in the bowl first, then the water and water with the proofed ADY, then the oil, etc. and, of course, mix by hand.  I don't necessarily understand the importance of the sequence of putting the ingredients together, but I'll have to try Tom's suggestion and see the results.  While it sounds like it was intended for thin crust pizzas, I think the methodology has definite application for deep dish style also.  After the first rise with one of mine, the shaggy look kind of disappears and esp. after then putting it into a zip lock bag and into the refrigerator for a day or two. 
 
In Tom's description, he talks of adding just half of the flour at one point, then salt and sugar, then the remainder of the flour.  While he didn't mention it, I wonder if he meant to wait a while and do a kind of autolyse.  Am always looking for some new good ideas.
 
The PMQ thread discussion you referenced was interesting, too.  Altho I didn't follow the gum line issue too closely, several pizza owners described their similar processes and the owner of a pizzeria in Missouri, just southeast of KC, indicated a similar process.  Their website showed a Chicago deep dish pizza (pictured below) and I imagine that they might have followed a similar procedure for it.  The texture of the crust on the pizza looked very good.
 
An interesting aside regarding the Missouri pizzeria, which is called Next Door Pizza, is the description on the site how they got started:  "The recipes themselves are completely original and are the result of (the owner's) cooking over 700 pizzas in his home during the past year. Daily, (the owner) himself makes all of the dough in-house." Can you imagine making over 700 pizzas at home during one year?
                                                                         
                                                                   --BTB           :-\

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Biscuit-like Crust--Tom Lehmann
« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2011, 10:29:00 AM »
BTB,

Interestingly, the member who started Next Door Pizza is/was a member of this forum (pcuezze, or Patrick, http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=8451). He posts quite regularly over at the PMQ Think Tank. His posts there make interesting reading for anyone considering opening up a pizzeria. Patrick, formerly a lawyer, has experienced many of the startup issues and pitfalls that new pizza operators have to deal with. Also, as you can see from Reply 7 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10310.msg91366.html#msg91366, it looks like Patrick is using a version of your Malnati's/semolina deep-dish dough recipe, and also one of DKM's for the thin crust. No doubt he was making many of those 700 pizzas while he was a member here.

Peter

Offline BTB

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Re: Biscuit-like Crust--Tom Lehmann
« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2011, 11:29:08 AM »
Isn't that funny as well as fascinating.  I hadn't viewed those threads before.  I thought his website and pizzeria looked really great and hope he has some super success.  I use to travel a lot to the KC area when on business and I'd sure love to get out some day in his direction and visit his restaurant.  An original home pizzamaker and a lawyer to boot,  . . . what's not to love?

And he uses semolina in his deep dish formulation, too.  The number 1 deep dish pizzeria down here in Tampa uses about 30% semolina in their formulations also.  All in his area should visit his place and get some great pizza, food and drink.

                                                                                                    --BTB
Next Door Pizza
3385 SW Fascination Dr.
Lees Summit, MO  64081
   (816) 763-1200
http://www.nextdoorpizza.com/


 

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