Author Topic: First Square In A Long Time  (Read 2785 times)

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Offline pizzablogger

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First Square In A Long Time
« on: May 11, 2011, 09:11:37 PM »
Out of practice....for real.

Secret Service Square made with sauce utilizing a large 106oz can of Paulie Gee's secretly sourced tomatoes.

Highest hydration square I have made in many a moon.

100% Flour (70% KABF, 30% MC00)
84% Water
2.60% Salt
18.00% Starter

I punted the bake  :(

Par baked (in pan placed on top of pizza stone on highest level rack) with just a light layer of sauce in middle for 7 minutes. Removed pan and immediately put broiler on high. Topped with smoked mozzarella and red onion directly on crust for the slight bacony note that combo imparts. Then a layer of sauce made from Paulie Gee's secretly sourced tomatoes, some freshly grated Montegrappa, cubes of fior-di-latte, drizzle of olive oil, salt and into the oven. Under the broiler for exactly six minutes, with me moving the pan around in an attempt to get an even heat distribution. I singed one edge of the pie. Fresh basil and a some freshly grated 36 month old Parmigiano-Reggiano immediately post bake.

Too much high heat at the end of the bake from the broiler. I should have let the pie par bake for about 1 to 2 minutes longer to set up the crust better before topping it and putting it under the broiler.

Definitely a tad soggy when I took these pics immediately after the bake. It did set-up better after a couple minutes of cooling. It was a pleasure to make a square after so long. Some rough spots to smooth out and I need to get back into the swing of it. The flavor of this pizza was very good, but the crust and bake left me a little wanting.

The prerequisite pics. You can see the bake could have been better. Funny how the pies always seem to disappear quickly none-the-less --K

"It's Baltimore, gentlemen, the gods will not save you." --Burrell


Offline dellavecchia

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Re: First Square In A Long Time
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2011, 09:38:55 PM »
Kelly - Such a beautiful crumb and product. I love your topping layers. Was this a room temp ferment? How long?

John

Offline norma427

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Re: First Square In A Long Time
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2011, 09:42:30 PM »
Kelly,

I agree with John, that is a beautiful crumb!   :)

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline pizzablogger

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Re: First Square In A Long Time
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2011, 09:55:42 PM »
Thanks John and Norma.

John, it was a combination of ambient and cold.

From the notes I jotted down........

All flour, starter and 90% of water hand incorporated. 30 minute autolyse. Mixed salt into remaining 10% of water and then added that to the mix by squeezing in hands. Light hand knead for a couple of minutes. Turns at 30 and 90 minutes. Stretch and folds at 60 and 120 minutes and then into the fridge. 77F dough temp at time of retardation.

58 hours in fridge total. I was planning on shorter, but I fell to sleep that night early! I did a quick, cold stretch and fold at 48 hours.

When finally taking dough out of fridge, the dough/gluten development "felt" pretty good upon warming up, so I did no further folding or turns, just a light shaping into an oblong after an hour out of the fridge. Let dough warm up in that shape for 3 hours, then put in pan and stretched to fit pan. 4 more hours resting/final rise in pan then into the oven.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2011, 09:57:48 PM by pizzablogger »
"It's Baltimore, gentlemen, the gods will not save you." --Burrell

buceriasdon

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Re: First Square In A Long Time
« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2011, 10:06:56 PM »
Others: " Mmmmmm, munch munch"
Kelly: "Boy, I am so out of practice"
Others: " Mmmmmmm,this is so good!"
Kelly: " Well, I'll know what to do different next time."
Others:" munch, munch, yum"


Offline dellavecchia

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Re: First Square In A Long Time
« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2011, 07:08:31 AM »
Thanks John and Norma.

John, it was a combination of ambient and cold.

From the notes I jotted down........

All flour, starter and 90% of water hand incorporated. 30 minute autolyse. Mixed salt into remaining 10% of water and then added that to the mix by squeezing in hands. Light hand knead for a couple of minutes. Turns at 30 and 90 minutes. Stretch and folds at 60 and 120 minutes and then into the fridge. 77F dough temp at time of retardation.

58 hours in fridge total. I was planning on shorter, but I fell to sleep that night early! I did a quick, cold stretch and fold at 48 hours.

When finally taking dough out of fridge, the dough/gluten development "felt" pretty good upon warming up, so I did no further folding or turns, just a light shaping into an oblong after an hour out of the fridge. Let dough warm up in that shape for 3 hours, then put in pan and stretched to fit pan. 4 more hours resting/final rise in pan then into the oven.


You know, I have never tried letting the dough rise in the pan. Do you think that helps with spring? And it is amazing how well KABF performs with minimal handling - I am also surprised to see such beautiful browning without the use of oil.

From your detailed explanation of workflow, it seems your background in in bread making  ;)

John

Offline pizzablogger

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Re: First Square In A Long Time
« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2011, 08:07:22 AM »
You know, I have never tried letting the dough rise in the pan. Do you think that helps with spring? And it is amazing how well KABF performs with minimal handling - I am also surprised to see such beautiful browning without the use of oil.

From your detailed explanation of workflow, it seems your background in in bread making  ;)

John

John, I really have no idea if letting the dough rise in the pan helps with spring or not, being it is the way I have always done it.

What may potentially help is the use of a pizza stone. With my earlier squares, I just put the pan into the oven by itself. After several batches, I started to use a pizza stone and put the pan right on top of that, allowing my stone to pre-heat at my oven's maximum temperature (550F) for an hour after the pre-heat cycle brings the oven to maximum temp. My stone typically reads around 575 to 580F after that hour.

It could be coincidence that getting a better rise was not from placing my pan on a pre-heated stone, but that my competence with making a square pizza had developed enough by the time I started incorporating the stone that I would have been able to get some decent spring at that point, stone or no. But I've used a stone consistently since, so it's hard to say how much spring is attributable to that fact.

There is no oil in the dough or in the container it fermented in. I do put a moderate amount of olive oil in the bottom of the pan, but none on top of the dough. I think finishing the bake under my broiler helps with the browning.

As an aside, my ultimate square pie vision is was confirmed during on one trip to NYC. After eating at Totonno's Coney Island and then DiFara, we picked up a square from L&B Spumoni Gardens on the way to Paulie Gee's. By the time we got to Paulie's, the L&B pie had cooled. Paulie dropped it into his WFO for a fashion as an experiment.....some of the pie got burnt, but the portions of the pizza that were not burnt were revelatory.

I've thought for a few years now of a spring-form pan for a square pie cooked in a WFO....where the pie is initially cooked (no olive oil in the bottom) in a WFO with the bottom of the pan on to set the initial lift, then topping the pizza, removing the bottom of the springform (so only the sides of the form remain for support), sliding a peel under it and finishing the bake in the WFO with the bottom of the pie right on the refractory floor. I think the combination of what we already love about square/sicilian pizzas with the bottom charred like a Neapolitan-style pie and a leopard spotted upper/outer rim could potentially be seriously gangbusters pizza!  :)
« Last Edit: May 12, 2011, 08:09:54 AM by pizzablogger »
"It's Baltimore, gentlemen, the gods will not save you." --Burrell

Offline plainslicer

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Re: First Square In A Long Time
« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2011, 02:20:56 PM »
That pizza looks delicious.

I noticed on the first photo, top right there's some translucent parts of the crust. Does anyone know what causes this? I've had it a few times when I've tried to cold-ferment with starter instead of baker's yeast, so I've just assumed it's something with the acids or perhaps too much bacterial activity resulting in no sugars left. But since the other parts of the crust are nicely browned I'm definitely a bit confused.

Mine were entirely pale and translucent, and looked disgusting.

Offline pizzablogger

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Re: First Square In A Long Time
« Reply #8 on: May 12, 2011, 09:30:16 PM »
That pizza looks delicious.

I noticed on the first photo, top right there's some translucent parts of the crust. Does anyone know what causes this? I've had it a few times when I've tried to cold-ferment with starter instead of baker's yeast, so I've just assumed it's something with the acids or perhaps too much bacterial activity resulting in no sugars left. But since the other parts of the crust are nicely browned I'm definitely a bit confused.

Mine were entirely pale and translucent, and looked disgusting.

Hey plainslicer.

You are correct....there is some translucent action in the top pic. That is from not letting the pizza cook long enough to set the crust more adequately before adding toppings and finishing under the broiler. All of my squares start off by springing with a completely transparent quality to the top outer crust...this transparent quality diminishes and eventually vanishes as the crust cooks and sets. As I mentioned earlier in the thread, I should have let the pizza cook for another minute or two before pulling the pie and topping it before finishing under the broiler.

Good eye spotting that. It was minimal on the pie, but the transparent action was there in places. --K
"It's Baltimore, gentlemen, the gods will not save you." --Burrell

Offline scott r

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Re: First Square In A Long Time
« Reply #9 on: May 12, 2011, 11:19:09 PM »
so beautiful!!!!!


Offline hotsawce

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Re: First Square In A Long Time
« Reply #10 on: June 24, 2011, 09:30:08 PM »
PizzaBlogger,

I haven't made a pie in a little while but I really liked your first bake method for the squares. Par Bake on the stone, no toppings, and finish it off under the broiler. They came out really amazing that way.

Offline teglia

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Re: First Square In A Long Time
« Reply #11 on: July 25, 2011, 06:06:12 PM »
thanks for posting this your pie looks amazing and i also like your vision of square pizza sounds so good, if i only had access to a WFO.