Author Topic: Intro  (Read 1396 times)

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Offline drscottky

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Intro
« on: May 12, 2011, 10:43:06 PM »
To paraphrase an old song: "The Midwest is mine, but it ain't home. New York is home, but it ain't mine no more." I left the East Coast in '97  and I'm tired of waiting for a yearly visit back East to get the pies that I crave. So I'm going to learn how to make the pizza I love.  I'm starting from scratch but I have an oven and a Kitchenaid mixer, so I'm counting on you guys to help me learn the rest. Any essential "how to" book about making thin crust pizza that somebody can recommend? 

scott   


Offline scott123

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Re: Intro
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2011, 06:44:38 PM »
Scott, welcome to the forum.  

As of this moment, for thin style pizza, there is no book you can buy. At least, not a good book.  American Pie, authored by Peter Reinhart, has a few fans, but it's geared more toward non NYers who really aren't striving for anything authentic. Jeff Varasano's web page also has a following, and, although he understands pizza more than Reinhart, the recipe is dated and his obsession with sourdough makes things unnecessarily complicated for the beginning pizza baker.

I'm going to go under the assumption that you're striving for something authentically NY. I've been tweaking my recipe for ages, and, although I'll still probably play around with it, I'm using it frequently enough that I think it's a good time to post it.

For one 16" skin:

Spring King Flour (bromated 12.6% protein)   282g (100%)  
Tap (hard) water room temp (68 deg.)   188g (66%)
IDY   1/2 t. (0.57%)
Salt   5g (1.77%)
Soybean oil   8g (2.83%)
Sugar   3/4 t. (3g)   (1.06%)

Measure dry (no yeast). Measure wet (+ yeast). Dry into wet.
Knead until well mixed, but no further (2-4 minutes).  Dough should be somewhere between cottage cheese-y and smooth. (Window paning is too far). Scale. Ball and place in lightly oiled containers/proofing boxes. Refrigerate 2 days.  Remove from fridge 2 hours before baking (longer if containers are thick and insulating).

Bake on 1/2" x 16" x 16" steel plate (or larger if your oven can fit it). Pre-heat plate for 45 minutes at 500.  Plate should be positioned on an oven shelf that's about 7" from the broiler.  Before launching the pizza, crank the heat to the highest, turn on the broiler and wait 15 seconds. Launch, leaving broiler on for 2 minutes. Check after 3.  Pizza should finish baking in 4 to 4.5 minutes.

On a 16" pie, I put 7 ounces of sauce and 11 ounces of whole milk low moisture brick mozzarella.  If the sauce is the right consistency (on the thick side), the cheese won't slide too much, but if the sauce is thin, the cheese will have a tendency to migrate and boil over the rim.  Even with relatively thick sauce, keep the cheese away from the outer 2" of the skin.

My tap water has a lot of chlorine, so I have to boil it and then let it cool first.  I've tried bottled water, but I find tap gives me a little better oven spring.

The yeast quantity is going to be a rough ballpark. This dough is like clockwork for me and ferments in 2 days.  With your yeast, fridge temp, flour age, water, etc., it could be 1 day or even 3.  You're going to want to shoot for a doubling of the dough, but what's really critical is how the underside of the dough looks.  Ideally, if you have a large wide round clear proofing container, you can take photos of the underside and post them here.

If you've never opened a pizza skin before, you'll have a really hard time stretching this to 16". Stretching skills are something that neither a book nor this forum can help you master.  You just have to do it over and over again. Here's a video to get you started (ignore the rolling pin stuff and the tossing- this dough is too extensible to toss).

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjYqw1CLZsA" target="_blank" class="aeva_link bbc_link new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjYqw1CLZsA</a>


Launching skins off a peel is another area where practice is essential.  The nice thing about launching, though, is that you can launch the undressed skin onto the counter, put it back on the peel and launch it again, repeating it over and over.

Spring King flour can be hard to find.  If you have trouble, you can use bromated All Trumps and blend it with 33% all purpose.  In order to make a 'true' NY slice, though, you're going to want to track down bromated flour.

As you can tell from the recipe, you'll need a digital scale.

As I said, everything I'm recommending is based on the assumption that you want something as authentic as possible. It takes some work, but, once you track down all the tools/ingredients, it's really pretty simple.  If you want something easier and a bit better than what you can get locally (but not great), I'm sure your library will have American Pie.  ;D
« Last Edit: May 13, 2011, 06:56:38 PM by scott123 »

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Intro
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2011, 06:52:39 PM »
scott123,

If you don't mind, can you re-post your last reply in a new thread at the NY style board? I'm sure that there are a lot of members who are interested in how you have been making your NY style. You might title the thread so people will know that it is your formulation.

Peter

Offline scott123

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Re: Intro
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2011, 07:12:46 PM »
Peter,

I'd like to tweak my recipe just a little bit more before posting it to it's own thread.

Scott

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Intro
« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2011, 07:51:34 PM »
Fantastic post Scott. It was like a NY pizza clinic.

John

Offline scott123

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Re: Intro
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2011, 03:43:44 PM »
Thanks, John  ;D If I can get my act together, that's just the tip of the iceberg  :)

Offline Ronzo

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Re: Intro
« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2011, 03:52:17 PM »
To paraphrase an old song: "The Midwest is mine, but it ain't home. New York is home, but it ain't mine no more." I left the East Coast in '97  and I'm tired of waiting for a yearly visit back East to get the pies that I crave. So I'm going to learn how to make the pizza I love.  I'm starting from scratch but I have an oven and a Kitchenaid mixer, so I'm counting on you guys to help me learn the rest. Any essential "how to" book about making thin crust pizza that somebody can recommend? 

scott   
As a former East Coast resident (Upstate NY) living in Texas, I can wholeheartedly say "you've come to the right place".

Go find some Unglazed Quarry Tiles as your pizza stone in the home oven.

You don't really need a book right now... go into the NY Pie section of the forum. Read a few threads. Find one that piques your interest.
Fuggheddabowdit!

~ Ron

Former NY'er living in Texas
http://newtexianbrew.com - http://ronlennex.com/ - http://pinterest.com/NewTexianBrew

Offline Ronzo

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Re: Intro
« Reply #7 on: May 14, 2011, 03:53:14 PM »
...or just listen to Scott123... ;)
Fuggheddabowdit!

~ Ron

Former NY'er living in Texas
http://newtexianbrew.com - http://ronlennex.com/ - http://pinterest.com/NewTexianBrew

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Intro
« Reply #8 on: May 14, 2011, 06:56:20 PM »
Scott123, since I've been playing around more with cold fermented dough, I've been gradually going back to minimal hand kneading even with using caputo pizzeria 00 flour.   I'm still doing a long bulk fermentation in the fridge followed by balling very gingerly.   I never would have thought minimal kneading could work for low protein flours but apparently it can if used in conjunction with cold fermentation and some type of strength building move later on.   Anyways, just said all that to say that at the moment, our techniques are very similar. 

Chau