Author Topic: Getting pretty frustrated  (Read 9878 times)

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Offline Moondance

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #25 on: May 18, 2011, 10:57:49 PM »
ok, something went wrong there.  Here we go again.

It's Wed evening and i am mixing in my bm for Fri night bake;

100% FLOUR
63% WATER
0.20 idy FLEISHMANS BREAD MACHINE
1.75% salt Celtic Sea Salt
2% EVOO
1% sugar, organic pure cane
two dough balls at 17.67 oz ea

I am waiting for the water to get room temp.  dry ingredients are in a bowl mixed as per chick parm instructions.  Oil is in the BM waiting for the water, then the pre mixed dry will be added.  I will let it go thru the cycles but take it out at about 20 min in the final rise.  I'll see how the dough ball looks.  If it looks beautiful, I guess I will go ahead and put it in my oiled bowl, seal it and slip it into the fridge.  I was wondering if any of you agree that by keeping it on the stone, it over cooks.  I am guessing yes.  But I like hot pizza, that is why I tend to do it.  I have a stainless steel pizza pan that I will slide the pizza onto and slice it.  Then I  will sometimes put it back on the stone to stay hot.  Mistake?  Thanks so much for your suggestions. I feel like I'm going to get this figured out with your help.   :D
Regina

"Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul."
John Muir


Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #26 on: May 18, 2011, 11:09:24 PM »
Yes keeping a cooked pizza on a hot stone for any longer than 1 minute will cook and dry it out.   Once the pizza comes off the stone, I place it on a rack and allow to cool for 30seconds to 1 minute before cutting.   Eating hot pizza is best, but it will cool the more slices you eat.  Well that depends on how fast you can eat the slices.     :-D   

If the pie has cooled or the bottom has softened up, then I will occasionally place the remaining slices back onto the hot stone but will leave it there only 1 minute or so and then remove and eat. 

If you are putting your baked pizza on a SS pan and then the pan on the stone, that may be okay.  Hard to say as I haven't tried that.   Your pies maybe dry or tough on the outset prior to placing it back on the hot stone from overkneading, so it's hard to say if the stone is to blame for drying out the crumb. 

Chau

Offline chickenparm

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #27 on: May 18, 2011, 11:55:58 PM »
Regina,
What size is the dough balls for? I was just curious.When I make a dough for a smaller size,the rise does not seem very significant like it does when I make a larger dough say 16-17 inch dough ball.It can play tricks on your eyes and sometimes look like its not working as much.

Hope your new experiments work out for ya.

 :)



-Bill

Offline Moondance

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #28 on: May 19, 2011, 02:44:39 PM »
Things didn't quite go as planned last night.  I used the warmer water, I think it was about 65 degrees, mixed as per chickparm's method.  I let it go through the knead cycles and took it out of the BM.  I divided and placed them in my oiled rubbermaid containers and planned to let them rise about 30 min prior to going into the fridge.  I guess I forgot to set my timer and I proceeded to forget about them and then fell asleep watching TV.  So upon waking up about midnight (about 4 hours later) my poor doughballs had definitely risen and dried out on the top.  I was too tired to deal with it much so I just deflated and put the lids on.  This morning they were trying to escape out of the containers again.  I gently reballed and put them back in the fridge.  Should I toss them and try again tonight or should I go ahead and plan to bake tomorrow night?

Thanks Don for the link to the image reducer.  I downloaded it but when I right click the jpg file, it doesn't give me the option to reduce it.  I'll try to figure this out yet. 

I hope I am attaching 3 pics. 
Dough coming out the BM
Dough divided and into containers to rise for a short time on the counter
Dough the next morning  :(

Ok, I'm just going to attach one pic of the dough this morning.  The file is 64kb for one pic. 
Regina

"Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul."
John Muir

Offline Moondance

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #29 on: May 19, 2011, 02:53:52 PM »
Regina,
What size is the dough balls for? I was just curious.When I make a dough for a smaller size,the rise does not seem very significant like it does when I make a larger dough say 16-17 inch dough ball.It can play tricks on your eyes and sometimes look like its not working as much.

Hope your new experiments work out for ya.

 :)





It's for 14-15 inch.  This dough was quite wet in the BM which I don't recall was ever the case before.  I had to add about 4 finger pinches of flour and it was still quite sticky coming out of the BM.  It was not a firm dough ball in the end.  Here is hopefully a pic of it coming out of the BM
Regina

"Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul."
John Muir

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #30 on: May 19, 2011, 02:54:16 PM »
Well at least now you get to see how water temps and higher fermentation temps affect yeast activity.  Not sure if that dough will make it till tomorrow night.  It looks about ready to use at the time of that photo.  

If you want pizza tomorrow night, I'd make up a new batch but don't toss these balls.  Save a few to see what happens.  Bake one up and compare it.  Try to see the connection between amount of yeast, temps, extended cold fermentation, flavor, etc.

BTW, that dough looks great.  Divide, ball, and fridge.

Chau
« Last Edit: May 19, 2011, 02:56:01 PM by Jackie Tran »

Offline Moondance

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #31 on: May 19, 2011, 03:04:44 PM »
Well at least now you get to see how water temps and higher fermentation temps affect yeast activity.  Not sure if that dough will make it till tomorrow night.  It looks about ready to use at the time of that photo.  

If you want pizza tomorrow night, I'd make up a new batch but don't toss these balls.  Save a few to see what happens.  Bake one up and compare it.  Try to see the connection between amount of yeast, temps, extended cold fermentation, flavor, etc.

BTW, that dough looks great.  Divide, ball, and fridge.

Chau

I will make up a new batch tonight.  That was my thinking too.    I think I may go ahead and bake one of last night's attempt this evening.  Good idea.
Regina

"Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul."
John Muir

buceriasdon

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #32 on: May 19, 2011, 03:10:11 PM »
Regina, One thing I would do is change the camera setting to small image. That will help reduce the image size. I see Image Optimizer did work. I concur, that dough will be less than optimum for Friday night but do bake it with just sauce and cheese for comparison to newer dough. Hey, things happen, it's just dough.
Don

Offline pdog

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #33 on: May 19, 2011, 03:21:34 PM »
Hi Regina,

I have noticed the one of the biggest factors in cold ferment doughs is the time period between mixing, balling and refrigerating.

A time window of as little as 15-20mins will make all of the difference in the world.  For example I made dough on Monday night, and was going to cold ferment for Friday's pizza night.  I got tied up on the phone, and my normal 4-5 day cold ferment (bare minimum time frame) rise dough was left on the counter 20 minutes at room temp.  Needless to say..... i had to make pizza last night!  There was no way the dough would have lasted, and not have over fermented by Friday.

I have to change my dough approach depending on how many days I need the dough to sit in the fridge.  Kneading, and fermentation take a lot of trial and error to get the right mixture so the dough will work for your oven, and your home set up.

I normally use room temp to cold water, with little kneading <5mins, and minimal room temp exposure to make my dough.  Then its balled and off to the fridge for 5-7 days. This allows time to do the kneading for the dough, and a cold temp to retard yeast activity.  At the end of 5 days there will be small yeast bubbles in the bottom of the dough with this process.

If I need dough for the next day..... its luke warm water, and a 30 minute room temp rise, and then balled and off to the fridge.  There will be small to medium yeast bubbles in the bottom of the dough within 4 hours.

Its takes a lot of tasty failures to achieve a great pie!


Offline Moondance

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #34 on: May 19, 2011, 05:12:25 PM »
Hi Regina,

I have noticed the one of the biggest factors in cold ferment doughs is the time period between mixing, balling and refrigerating.

A time window of as little as 15-20mins will make all of the difference in the world.  For example I made dough on Monday night, and was going to cold ferment for Friday's pizza night.  I got tied up on the phone, and my normal 4-5 day cold ferment (bare minimum time frame) rise dough was left on the counter 20 minutes at room temp.  Needless to say..... i had to make pizza last night!  There was no way the dough would have lasted, and not have over fermented by Friday.

I have to change my dough approach depending on how many days I need the dough to sit in the fridge.  Kneading, and fermentation take a lot of trial and error to get the right mixture so the dough will work for your oven, and your home set up.

I normally use room temp to cold water, with little kneading <5mins, and minimal room temp exposure to make my dough.  Then its balled and off to the fridge for 5-7 days. This allows time to do the kneading for the dough, and a cold temp to retard yeast activity.  At the end of 5 days there will be small yeast bubbles in the bottom of the dough with this process.

If I need dough for the next day..... its luke warm water, and a 30 minute room temp rise, and then balled and off to the fridge.  There will be small to medium yeast bubbles in the bottom of the dough within 4 hours.

Its takes a lot of tasty failures to achieve a great pie!


Thanks pdog.  The longer I keep trying to figure it out, the more I realize how complex pizza making is.  But it's a fun and as you say tasty journey.  That's good information and I will start paying a lot more attention to the water temps and rise factors. 

What do you use to mix your dough with only 5 min of kneading?
Regina

"Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul."
John Muir

Offline chickenparm

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #35 on: May 19, 2011, 05:30:27 PM »
It's for 14-15 inch.  This dough was quite wet in the BM which I don't recall was ever the case before.  I had to add about 4 finger pinches of flour and it was still quite sticky coming out of the BM.  It was not a firm dough ball in the end.  Here is hopefully a pic of it coming out of the BM

The dough looks good to me there.! Making good progress as well.Now for sure you are getting your rise out of the dough.Its too bad you fell asleep before putting it away!

My dough sometimes comes out a bit stickier than other times,maybe its the weather or the humidity, and I use a little more bench flour as well to remove it from the bread machine.I don't want the ball to get firm or tight,it should be very soft,almost baby bottom soft when you put a little flour on it so it doesn't feel sticky anymore.

Am very glad to see the progress you just made.It seems so complex but its not.Once you dial in how the dough making works in the machine,you will produce nearly the same thing every time.

 :)









-Bill

Offline Moondance

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #36 on: May 19, 2011, 11:10:59 PM »
I baked one of the over=risen dough balls tonight.  It was not great.  It did not strech out like usual so and it cooked up thicker than I like.  It tasted ok and the rim was puffy but a bit too chewy overall.  I removed it from the stone to my ss pizza pan.  I cooked it at 550 for about 8 min on the bottom rack and it still did not look quite done so I moved it to the top rack for about 2 min.

I mixed up another batch for tomorrow night.

flour 100%
water 60%
IDY 0.3 %
Salt 2.0%
oil 2.0%
sugar 2.0%

one dough ball 14" 15.39 OZ

i took it out after the first knead cycle about 12 min.  I did not have to add any flour or water and I will let it sit on the counter about 1/2 hour for bake tomorrow night.  It came out firmer than last nights dough.  Maybe I mis-measured last night.  I can post pics tomorrow from work. My computer at home is slow speed mountain connection.  In town I have high speed.

Timer just went off and I did not notice much rise in the doughafter about 1/2 hour.  I sealed it and put it in the fridge. 
Regina

"Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul."
John Muir

Offline Essen1

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #37 on: May 19, 2011, 11:50:59 PM »
I baked one of the over=risen dough balls tonight.  It was not great.  It did not strech out like usual so and it cooked up thicker than I like.  It tasted ok and the rim was puffy but a bit too chewy overall.  I removed it from the stone to my ss pizza pan.  I cooked it at 550 for about 8 min on the bottom rack and it still did not look quite done so I moved it to the top rack for about 2 min.

I mixed up another batch for tomorrow night.

flour 100%
water 60%
IDY 0.3 %
Salt 2.0%
oil 2.0%
sugar 2.0%

one dough ball 14" 15.39 OZ

I took it out after the first knead cycle about 12 min.  I did not have to add any flour or water and I will let it sit on the counter about 1/2 hour for bake tomorrow night.  It came out firmer than last nights dough.  Maybe I mis-measured last night.  I can post pics tomorrow from work. My computer at home is slow speed mountain connection.  In town I have high speed.

Timer just went off and I did not notice much rise in the doughafter about 1/2 hour.  I sealed it and put it in the fridge.  

Regina,

Do you have a pic of the latest pie you just made?

When I look at your formula, might first thought was "Too much oil & salt".  Your doughball was 436gr. and when I ran those numbers through the calculator it came out to this:

Flour (100%):
Water (60%):
IDY (0.3%):
Salt (2%):
Oil (2%):
Sugar (2%):
Total (166.3%):
262.18 g  |  9.25 oz | 0.58 lbs
157.31 g  |  5.55 oz | 0.35 lbs
0.79 g | 0.03 oz | 0 lbs | 0.26 tsp | 0.09 tbsp
5.24 g | 0.18 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.94 tsp | 0.31 tbsp
5.24 g | 0.18 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.17 tsp | 0.39 tbsp
5.24 g | 0.18 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.32 tsp | 0.44 tbsp
436 g | 15.38 oz | 0.96 lbs | TF = N/A

IF that is your formula above...I suggest that you might want to lower the salt amount, lower the oil amount and keep the sugar the same. Salt is known as an inhibitor to yeast activity and oil can make the crust too pliable. It can also prevent the flour from absorbing all the water.

What kind of mixer are you using?
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

Offline pdog

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #38 on: May 20, 2011, 12:58:35 PM »
Thanks pdog.  The longer I keep trying to figure it out, the more I realize how complex pizza making is.  But it's a fun and as you say tasty journey.  That's good information and I will start paying a lot more attention to the water temps and rise factors.  

What do you use to mix your dough with only 5 min of kneading?

Hi,

I use a Kitchen Aid mix, or the stretch and fold method.

I might even go so far as to say I mix my pizza, and not knead.  I keep my dough very wet right up to the last minute.  I use a wet dough for my pizza 68-70% hydration and 3% of oil.  My dough will look like a thick pancake batter up to the last 1/4 of flour is added.  Even then it does not form a ball in the mixer and does not pull away from the bowl. I even use the paddle attachment until the last one minute of mixing.

I would spend sometime and read through this website..... It has a lot of info and technique listed out in one place:

http://www.varasanos.com/PizzaRecipe.htm

This site got me to make a pizza that actual looked like pizza!  This forum has taken me from this site to the next level.  Jeff's pizza is very specific to a high heat approach to pizza making, and this site will help balance his high heat approach with a traditional oven approach.  I have a standard GE gas oven, and with some creative fire block placement I can achieve 750-800 degrees with the thermometer registering only 480-500 F.

Here is a picture of how wet my dough is once all the flour is mixed into the dough.  It may be surprising to see!
« Last Edit: May 20, 2011, 01:10:10 PM by pdog »

Offline pdog

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #39 on: May 20, 2011, 01:01:44 PM »
Thanks pdog.  The longer I keep trying to figure it out, the more I realize how complex pizza making is.  But it's a fun and as you say tasty journey.  That's good information and I will start paying a lot more attention to the water temps and rise factors.  

What do you use to mix your dough with only 5 min of kneading?

The picture of above is the stage I spoke about yesterday regarding time before balling.  If I need the dough within two days I will let the dough sit in the mixing bowl for 20-30 mins in this stage.  Then pour the dough, yes POUR the dough, onto a heavily floured surface and ball, and straight into the fridge.

If I want 6-7 day cold ferment dough, once I stop the mixing.... its balled and into the fridge with 2-5 minutes! This pizza was cooked in my home over on a simple stone with fire block placed on the rack above it.
« Last Edit: May 20, 2011, 01:15:32 PM by pdog »

Offline pdog

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #40 on: May 20, 2011, 01:06:11 PM »
Thanks pdog.  The longer I keep trying to figure it out, the more I realize how complex pizza making is.  But it's a fun and as you say tasty journey.  That's good information and I will start paying a lot more attention to the water temps and rise factors.  

What do you use to mix your dough with only 5 min of kneading?

Here is a picture of a sourdough bread that I did not knead at all....... I mixed all ingredients under 1 minute.

All of the kneading in this dough was completed by time only!  It warm fermented for 18 hours, and this time period aligned the gluten and performed the function of "kneading" the dough.

My general rule of thumb is short ferment = a need for more kneading....... long ferment = little to no kneading.

General rule - re worded to be visually descriptive........ Short ferment = kneading until dough looks smooth or silky..... Long ferment = dough looks lumpy and dull.

Hope this helps!

Just simply don't give up...... Here is a picture of where I started!
« Last Edit: May 20, 2011, 01:22:07 PM by pdog »

Offline Moondance

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #41 on: May 21, 2011, 12:42:02 PM »
Regina,

Do you have a pic of the latest pie you just made?

When I look at your formula, might first thought was "Too much oil & salt".  Your doughball was 436gr. and when I ran those numbers through the calculator it came out to this:

Flour (100%):
Water (60%):
IDY (0.3%):
Salt (2%):
Oil (2%):
Sugar (2%):
Total (166.3%):
262.18 g  |  9.25 oz | 0.58 lbs
157.31 g  |  5.55 oz | 0.35 lbs
0.79 g | 0.03 oz | 0 lbs | 0.26 tsp | 0.09 tbsp
5.24 g | 0.18 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.94 tsp | 0.31 tbsp
5.24 g | 0.18 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.17 tsp | 0.39 tbsp
5.24 g | 0.18 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.32 tsp | 0.44 tbsp
436 g | 15.38 oz | 0.96 lbs | TF = N/A

IF that is your formula above...I suggest that you might want to lower the salt amount, lower the oil amount and keep the sugar the same. Salt is known as an inhibitor to yeast activity and oil can make the crust too pliable. It can also prevent the flour from absorbing all the water.

What kind of mixer are you using?

Thanks Mike for your input.  I am using a Bread Machine.  I do not have a mixer.  Would you suggest 1% for the oil and salt?    I think I need to stick to something more simplistic than the very wet dough you are mixing.  Once I get more confident, I will delve into more variations.   

I was quite pleased with last night's bake.  I will post pics and more comments on Monday.  Home computer is too slow for the pictures.  Thanks also for the link to that website.  I will check it out for sure.  BTW that sourdough bread looks beautiful and I appreciate your rules of thumb with regard to ferment time and kneading.  Gives me much to think about and more tools in my toolbag!
Regina

"Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul."
John Muir


Offline Moondance

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #42 on: May 24, 2011, 03:51:30 PM »
I am still having problems reducing image sizes on my pics.  My picture of the finished pie reduced but not quite small enough.  I'm searching the internet for other programs that might work.  That's why I haven't posted results from last Friday. 

Don, I saw on my camera that I can change the picture size, so I will try that for future images.
Regina

"Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul."
John Muir

Offline Essen1

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #43 on: May 24, 2011, 03:54:37 PM »
I am still having problems reducing image sizes on my pics.  My picture of the finished pie reduced but not quite small enough.  I'm searching the internet for other programs that might work.  That's why I haven't posted results from last Friday. 

Don, I saw on my camera that I can change the picture size, so I will try that for future images.

Regina,

Use this:

http://download.cnet.com/Image-Resizer-Powertoy-for-Windows-XP/3000-18487_4-10905400.html
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #44 on: May 24, 2011, 10:19:20 PM »
Out of curiosity, how long does your bread maker mix the dough? I suspect you are over-kneading the dough. As pdog posted, typically longer ferments require less mixing. However there is a point at which too much mixing just makes a hockey puck. Too dense and chewy. This differs from making bread because in bread baking you cook the dough once it has risen. Since you are making pizza with it, you are removing this air from the dough when you make the skin. The dough may be overdeveloped at that point.

Offline chickenparm

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #45 on: May 24, 2011, 11:04:51 PM »
Out of curiosity, how long does your bread maker mix the dough? I suspect you are over-kneading the dough. As pdog posted, typically longer ferments require less mixing. However there is a point at which too much mixing just makes a hockey puck. Too dense and chewy. This differs from making bread because in bread baking you cook the dough once it has risen. Since you are making pizza with it, you are removing this air from the dough when you make the skin. The dough may be overdeveloped at that point.

Dan,my bread machine mixes/kneads the dough in 30 minutes total knead/rest/knead/rise times.I believe her machine is about the same,only her rest time in between cycles is longer.Her machine rest time between mixing/kneading is closer to an ideal autolyse than mine is.

She's not using the machine to make or cook bread,just to mix or knead the dough.Same as myself.Bread machines have that option to knead dough whether it's for pizzas,bagels,or breads.

The dough does not care if the machine is called a bread machine or kitchen aid mixer.We have been trying to help her get her dough to rise better after mixing it in the machine.I seriously doubt its being overkneaded.The use of very cold water can retard the growth of the yeast and the doughballs.She changed the water temps and seen new changes.

I do agree that with longer ferment times,dough may require less kneading.That said,I would like to see some more of her progress with the new doughs shes mixed up before we go any further and guess the next step.

I know I had good success with my bread machining mixing and kneading doughs.I believe she can do the same.

 :)
-Bill

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #46 on: May 24, 2011, 11:23:48 PM »
I agree Bill.  Regina should let us know if her recent pies have improved and what she liked or did not like before more suggestions are made.   One of her original issues is inconsistency due to trying out too many different recipes (and flours).  Regina, your salt and oil %'s are within an acceptable range.  IF you find that the crumb is too tough or chewy and you decide to decrease the amount of kneading, then at that point I would suggest to decrease the oil to 1% to see the difference.  As it is though, it seems appropriate given the amount of kneading from the bread machine.

Chau

Offline Moondance

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #47 on: May 25, 2011, 03:58:59 PM »
Regina,

Use this:

http://download.cnet.com/Image-Resizer-Powertoy-for-Windows-XP/3000-18487_4-10905400.html

I hate to sound like a complete idiot, but I have downloaded this file and saved it but I do not understand how to use it.  There is supposed to be a taskbar somewhere and I cannot find it.  If I right click a JPG file type I do not get an option to resize.    This is making me crazy.  Any suggestions? 

Regina

"Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul."
John Muir

buceriasdon

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #48 on: May 25, 2011, 04:19:43 PM »
Regina, I saw that Image Optimizer was working for you, sorry, not familar with that other program. It may be you have to delete one of them or both and then download the one you want to use.
Don


I hate to sound like a complete idiot, but I have downloaded this file and saved it but I do not understand how to use it.  There is supposed to be a taskbar somewhere and I cannot find it.  If I right click a JPG file type I do not get an option to resize.    This is making me crazy.  Any suggestions?  


« Last Edit: May 25, 2011, 04:21:29 PM by buceriasdon »

Offline chickenparm

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Re: Getting pretty frustrated
« Reply #49 on: May 25, 2011, 04:30:11 PM »
I hate to sound like a complete idiot, but I have downloaded this file and saved it but I do not understand how to use it.  There is supposed to be a taskbar somewhere and I cannot find it.  If I right click a JPG file type I do not get an option to resize.    This is making me crazy.  Any suggestions? 



In a file,put the photos on thumbnails so you can see each picture you saved.

Left Click on the picture you want to select to use or resize,and make it highlight blue or whatever color it uses.When it does that,right click and see if resize is now there on the list.If it is,click resize and it will make a smaller one on the bottom of the file below the larger pics.

I had the same problem you did,and I did restart the computer when the resize was not there at first.There is also no other file or icon to click to open once it downloads...it will aalready be part of the program now.You wont have to look for it either.It will be there on right click after you click on a picture you want to change.


-Bill