Author Topic: Throw Dough  (Read 6674 times)

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Offline raji

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Throw Dough
« on: May 22, 2005, 01:49:13 PM »
I just came across a website called Throw Dough (http://www.throwdough.com).  They make a plastic dough-like substance that people can use to practice stretching dough.  Was wondinering if anyone has tried it out.  I'm considering ordering it and would love to hear any feedback that people might have.


Offline pizzamagic

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Re: Throw Dough
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2005, 07:06:40 PM »
Flour and water are pretty cheap to practice with. Why buy plastic?
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Throw Dough
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2005, 07:53:28 PM »
dheeraji,

Acrobatic dough--the kind that new pizza makers are often trained with--is different from regular dough. One of the big differences is the amount of salt--a far higher amount is used, presumably to toughen up the dough so that it doesn't tear easily. I believe it was one of our fellow native Italian members that made a similar observation.

If you are interested in making your own acrobatic dough, there is a recipe posted at the PMQ site. Steve posted it sometime ago, but it is http://www.pmq.com/cgi-bin/pizzacookbook/recipe.cgi?action=view_recipe&id=83&recipe=TONYíS+DOUGH+RECIPE+FOR+ACROBATIC+PIZZA+TOSSING&category=Pizza+Dough.

The recipe is Tony Gemignani's recipe. He is the guy who owns a pizza restaurant in CA (by the name of Pyzano's) and has won so many competitions that he was basically asked not to compete again (or as often) to give others a chance. So, now he is a judge at competitions. Unfortunately, his recipe for acrobatic dough doesn't give baker's percents to allow us to easily downsize his recipe to a single pizza size, and he also mixes weights with volumes which complicates things a little bit, but I think I can figure his recipe out and possibly downsize it for you if you'd like.

Peter

EDIT (7/6/14): For a substitute link to the PMQ Recipe referenced above, see http://www.pmq.com/Recipe-Bank/index.php/name/Acrobatic-Training-Dough/record/57732/

Offline raji

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Re: Throw Dough
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2005, 09:41:59 PM »
dheeraji,

Acrobatic dough--the kind that new pizza makers are often trained with--is different from regular dough. One of the big differences is the amount of salt--a far higher amount is used, presumably to toughen up the dough so that it doesn't tear easily. I believe it was one of our fellow native Italian members that made a similar observation.

If you are interested in making your own acrobatic dough, there is a recipe posted at the PMQ site. Steve posted it sometime ago, but it is http://www.pmq.com/cgi-bin/pizzacookbook/recipe.cgi?action=view_recipe&id=83&recipe=TONYíS+DOUGH+RECIPE+FOR+ACROBATIC+PIZZA+TOSSING&category=Pizza+Dough.

The recipe is Tony Gemignani's recipe. He is the guy who owns a pizza restaurant in CA (by the name of Pyzano's) and has won so many competitions that he was basically asked not to compete again (or as often) to give others a chance. So, now he is a judge at competitions. Unfortunately, his recipe for acrobatic dough doesn't give baker's percents to allow us to easily downsize his recipe to a single pizza size, and he also mixes weights with volumes which complicates things a little bit, but I think I can figure his recipe out and possibly downsize it for you if you'd like.

Peter


I'm pretty new to pizza making and thought the Throw Dough would be a good for learning how to shape pizzas.  I think I'll prolly end up sticking with regular dough.  I still need a bit of practice with making the dough itself!

Thanks.

Offline Sour_Jax

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Re: Throw Dough
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2005, 10:11:31 AM »
Is there a smaller version of this recipe available?  I'm still working on my baker's math.
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Throw Dough
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2005, 03:54:56 PM »
Sour Jack,

I took a stab at downsizing the Tony G. acrobatic dough recipe for a single 8-oz. practice dough. Before getting to the math, I suggest that the version of the Tony G. acrobatic dough recipe posted at the PMQ recipe bank be replaced by the version posted at the following website: http://www.worldpizzachampions.com/dough.html#Acrobatic. The newer version is the same as the PMQ version but is more specific in that it specifies the yeast to be ADY and it also separates the water into two portions, one for proofing the ADY and the remainder for the dough itself. Before anyone panics when they see the downsized recipe, there are a few points to keep in mind about acrobatic doughs. They are not the same as doughs intended to be made into pizzas for someone to eat. They are quite dry (with a hydration level of around 46%), use very cold water, and contain minuscule amounts of yeast and sugar as compared with normal doughs. They use a reasonable amount of oil, for increased extensibility, but, most notably, use a great deal more salt than would ever be used in a normal dough.

The Tony G. acrobatic dough recipe, with some general conversions to specify all the ingredients in ounces, is as follows:

High gluten-flour (13.5%), 32 lbs., or 512 oz. (32 lbs. x 16 oz./lb.)
Water (at 75 degrees F), 1 qt., or 33.33 oz. (1 qt. x 2.083 lbs./qt. x 16 oz./lb.)
Water (very cold), 7 qt., or 233.33 oz. (7 qt. x 2.083 lbs./qt. x 16 oz./lb.)
ADY, 1 oz.
Sugar, 2 oz.
Salt, 20 oz.
Vegetable oil, 1 c., or 7.90 oz.

Adding up all the weights, in ounces, yield a total dough weight of 809.56 ounces, or enough to make around 100 8-oz. dough balls or 80 10-oz. dough balls.

With the above numbers, the baker’s percents are as follows (using the standard 100% for the baker’s percent for the flour and dividing the amounts, by weight, of the remaining ingredients by the weight of flour to get the respective baker’s percents):

100%, High-gluten flour (13.5%)
6.51%, Water (at 75 degrees F, for proofing the ADY)
45.57%, Water (very cold, for the dough itself)
0.195%, ADY
0.39%, Sugar
3.91%, Salt
1.54%, Vegetable oil
Total of all percentages = 158.115

The Tony G. recipe mentions using 8-oz. or 10-oz. dough balls, and combining two of them for tossing use. The recipe presented below is for 8 oz., which, if doubled, would yield a 16-oz. dough ball. That would be enough to make a roughly 14-inch skin. To make multiples of the 8-oz. dough balls, all one needs to do is multiply the quantities given in the recipe below by the desired number of dough balls. In the recipe, the amount of flour needed is determined by dividing the weight of the dough ball, 8 oz., by 1.58115 (158.115/100), which yields 5.06 oz for the amount of flour. Each of the remaining quantities is determined by multiplying the weight of the flour (as calculated above) by the respective baker’s percents for the remaining ingredients. So, the final recipe shakes out as follows:

Tony G. Acrobatic Dough Recipe (One 8-oz Dough Ball)
100%, High-gluten flour (13.5%), 5.06 oz. (or about 1 c. plus 3 T.)
6.51%, Water (at 75 degrees F, for proofing the ADY), 0.33 oz. (about 2 t.)
45.57%, Water (very cold, for the dough itself), 2.30 oz. (1/3 c.)
0.195%, ADY, 0.010 oz. (about 3 to 4 pinches between the thumb and forefinger)
0.39%, Sugar, 0.020 oz., (a bit over 1/8 t.)
3.91%, Salt, 0.20 oz., (1 t.)
1.54%, Vegetable oil, 0.08 oz. (a bit less than 1/2 t.)

The instructions that one should follow for making the acrobatic dough are those mentioned in the instruction section posted at the abovereferenced website.

After going through all the work to get to a (hopefully) usable recipe, I hope that someone (maybe even Sour Jack) will actually give the scaled-down recipe a try to see if it has any real value and actually improves anyone’s dough tossing skills.

Peter

Offline Sour_Jax

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Re: Throw Dough
« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2005, 06:06:57 PM »
Thank you, thank you, thank you.

You hard work will not be in vain, I will be using this recipe to make practice dough and get to practicing.

Sour Jack
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Offline giotto

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Re: Throw Dough
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2005, 02:03:31 AM »
Raji & Sour-Jax:

I have gotten to know Tony Gemignani through his pizzeria and have great respect for him.  What they have on PMQ is not to be confused with the real thing, including his restaurant or competition recipe.  Tony has taken his team out of PMQ as well.

Here's the real thing, it's called PRO DOUGH. It includes an excellent DVSD and it's not made of Plastic. It can't be since Tony continues to use it himself for training, and while in hotel rooms and travelling while awaiting competitions. http://www.prodoughusa.com/tony_gemignani.html

Just as a leather basketball doesn't make you a ball player, dough without a video in technique from someone who really knows his stuff will not accomplish much.  Technique is a rare thing to learn, and Tony's DVD will teach it to you in tossing.  There is a reason why I have no problem with dough ripping, while others do.  Tony created PRO DOUGH himself and the DVD shows how to properly handle dough in order not to rip it.  When he walks you through how you should really toss dough, along with several tricks, you'll have a greater appreciation for how dough should be handled when not on a board. 

Every day, Tony perfoms outstanding tricks while making each dough for his customers.  This requires very special handling techniques without ripping the dough (he'll spin it like a basketball for a couple of minutes before laying it down for toppings).  Only for championships does he modify his real recipe.

I have taught several people with Tony's PRO DOUGH, and his material which simulates real dough has a huge advantage over dough when first learning.  Not only can you practice any time without a worry; but you learn from the 5x world champion how best to handle dough in the air.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2005, 11:04:49 PM by giotto »

Offline missoccer

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Re: Throw Dough
« Reply #8 on: July 03, 2006, 01:18:14 AM »
Throw Dough is great for learning how to spin pizza. Its the orginal and best way to learn, if you want to learn how to roll out dough, the you should certainly use real dough. You can go to http://www.throwdough.com/trickmonth.htm to learn the basic dough tossing moves. Good Luck

Offline missoccer

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Re: Throw Dough
« Reply #9 on: July 03, 2006, 01:20:35 AM »
Raji & Sour-Jax:

I have gotten to know Tony Gemignani through his pizzeria and have great respect for him.  What they have on PMQ is not to be confused with the real thing, including his restaurant or competition recipe.  Tony has taken his team out of PMQ as well.

Here's the real thing, it's called PRO DOUGH. It includes an excellent DVSD and it's not made of Plastic. It can't be since Tony continues to use it himself for training, and while in hotel rooms and travelling while awaiting competitions. http://www.prodoughusa.com/tony_gemignani.html

Just as a leather basketball doesn't make you a ball player, dough without a video in technique from someone who really knows his stuff will not accomplish much.  Technique is a rare thing to learn, and Tony's DVD will teach it to you in tossing.  There is a reason why I have no problem with dough ripping, while others do.  Tony created PRO DOUGH himself and the DVD shows how to properly handle dough in order not to rip it.  When he walks you through how you should really toss dough, along with several tricks, you'll have a greater appreciation for how dough should be handled when not on a board. 

Every day, Tony perfoms outstanding tricks while making each dough for his customers.  This requires very special handling techniques without ripping the dough (he'll spin it like a basketball for a couple of minutes before laying it down for toppings).  Only for championships does he modify his real recipe.

I have taught several people with Tony's PRO DOUGH, and his material which simulates real dough has a huge advantage over dough when first learning.  Not only can you practice any time without a worry; but you learn from the 5x world champion how best to handle dough in the air.
Prodough is too small for me to spin, it is good for people with little hands, if you have larger hands throw dough a little larger and easier to use.


Offline missoccer

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Re: Throw Dough
« Reply #10 on: July 03, 2006, 01:27:59 AM »
Throw Dough is great for learning how to spin pizza. Its the orginal and best way to learn, if you want to learn how to roll out dough, the you should certainly use real dough. You can go to http://www.throwdough.com/trickmonth.htm to learn the basic dough tossing moves. Good Luck

Throw Dough is not made of plastic but of a silicone base that simulate real dough, it took years for Steve Carb to invent this unique formula