Author Topic: The unique crumb chacteristics of Cake Yeast  (Read 5596 times)

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Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: The unique crumb chacteristics of Cake Yeast
« Reply #20 on: June 09, 2011, 11:20:12 PM »
Scott, I think I can taste a slight difference but I wouldn't be surprise if it was just in my head.  The taste is very marginal.   Also I have not notice an improvement in "taste" when IDY or CY doughs are fermented out for upto 6 days.  I know others say so, but I can't see it.  What I do see is that extended fermentation does help with digestibility making the dough much softer and giving it a more tender crumb.   Not so with starters. 

I also see that CY will often give a bigger lift than IDY if use in relatively proportionat amounts.   I only started this thread b/c I noted a perceived and exceedingly tender texture and tight celled crumb in 2 pizzas that I ate that were made with CY.  I then noted it in 2 different loaves of bread when made with CY.   It seemed to make sense...until I made some pizza recently and I didn't seem to get that closed cell crumb I was looking for.

On top of that, I made some crusts  that were exceedingly tender last night.  I was sure I had used CY but when I looked back into my notes it was IDY.   So these differences may only be perceived at this point.  I will definitely keep doing the experiments to see if there is a difference and update this thread as I find out more about CY. 

Chau


Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: The unique crumb chacteristics of Cake Yeast
« Reply #21 on: June 15, 2011, 03:53:23 PM »
I'll toss my hat into the ring on this one too. Cy is indeed highly perishable, needing constant refrigeration, and even at that, it will show signs of deterioration after about 10-days of correct refrigerated storage. The aroma of fresh, compressed yeast can run from musty (like old newspapers found in a damp basement) don't ask, to an ammonia smell. These are normal for compressed yeast. A good visual indicator for old or expired yeast is its color. Dark brown and a cracked appearance are good indicators that the yeast is long in the tooth. Texturally, the yeast can be dry feeling, or it may feel somewhat gummy/slightly sticky, both are normal. As yeast ages, it dies, and glutathione is released from the cells. Glutathione is a reducing agent much like L-cysteine (PZ-44) or you can even buy "dead yeast" as a natural reducing agent. Keep this in mind if you are forced into menu labeling and find yourself in need of a reducing agent. The reducing agent breaks down a portion of the gluten, making the dough more extensible as well as making the resulting crumb structure in the baked product more tender/less chewy. From a flavor and performance point, there is no difference in any of the three yeast types (compressed, ADY, IDY) when used at the correct substitution levels, and reconstituted correctly. A lot of the "old school" bakers still like to use compressed yeast because that's what "it" is, old school, and it fits well into their concept and way of doing things.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: The unique crumb chacteristics of Cake Yeast
« Reply #22 on: June 15, 2011, 04:27:23 PM »
Excellent! Thank you Tom for clearing up this mystery.   So it's not my imagination afterall, it's just old or older CY that creates that soft crumb. 

Offline landras

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Re: The unique crumb chacteristics of Cake Yeast
« Reply #23 on: July 14, 2011, 10:30:50 AM »
David, we just got a restaurant supply type store so I will check with them.  But for now, I don't mind paying a few dollars for a block from Great Harvest Bread Co.  Also knowing that I can freeze it and extend it's use is really cool as well.   One block should last me a really long time.   I'm curious to know how well this current block will work after 2-3 months of freezing.  

Chau

Back in time I worked in a lab with yeast (commercial and non commercial), because I liked to make pizzas and the cheapest yeast was CY with a friend with did an experiment, we got a block of CY and divided in small portions and freeze them, then we took out one of each every week and plated the yest on a agar dish and counted the number of colonies, I do not longer have the excel file (back up your data people!!) but after 6 months the number of colonies was reduced by 15% only. So I think you could use your frozen yeast after a few months..I will love to repeat the experiment now but when you work in a cancer lab nobody want to even hear the word yeast!! they are so invasive and contaminate everything......

Offline mililani

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Re: The unique crumb chacteristics of Cake Yeast
« Reply #24 on: June 02, 2013, 06:06:59 PM »
Back in time I worked in a lab with yeast (commercial and non commercial), because I liked to make pizzas and the cheapest yeast was CY with a friend with did an experiment, we got a block of CY and divided in small portions and freeze them, then we took out one of each every week and plated the yest on a agar dish and counted the number of colonies, I do not longer have the excel file (back up your data people!!) but after 6 months the number of colonies was reduced by 15% only. So I think you could use your frozen yeast after a few months..I will love to repeat the experiment now but when you work in a cancer lab nobody want to even hear the word yeast!! they are so invasive and contaminate everything......

Sorry to bump an old thread, but I just had to comment and say this is the kind of thing I love to read.  Instead of accepting conventional knowledge, I love it when people actually conduct experiments (albeit, hopefully rigorous such as this) that show the contrary.  This comment jibes with what my mother in law has been telling me about cake yeast!  It's NOT that perishable after all! 

By the way, she wraps her cake yeast with napkins and puts them in Tupperware before freezing.  She always gets amazing rises in her dough. 

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: The unique crumb chacteristics of Cake Yeast
« Reply #25 on: July 05, 2013, 02:53:23 PM »
Scott;
You're not alone, I don't see any significant difference in the flavor of products (breads and pizza crust) when made with either compressed or IDY. Compressed yeast has three recognized aromas 1) Kind of a musty, old, damp newspaper like aroma. This is the normal aroma for compressed yeast and it is indicative of good quality yeast. 2) Compressed yeast can also have an ammonia smell to it. This is also a normal aroma as the ammonia is simply left over from the culturing process. 3) Then there is a somewhat sharp, offensive odor which is common to yeast that is beginning to die-off. In addition to aroma, look at the color of the yeast, it should be a light tan/buff in color with some streaking, but if the yeast is turning a dark color (muddy gray to brown) this is an indication that the yeast is getting too long in the tooth. Because compressed yeast is highly perishable, and as it dies off, it releases glutathione (an amino acid contained within the yeast cell) which actually enhances dough mixing, in many home baking situations it may appear to actually perform better. This is NOT the case in a bakery or retail setting though. Glutathione is a dough relaxer (commercially sold as "dead yeast") and as such, it works exactly the same as L-cysteine aka PZ-44  giving a softer, more extensible dough with somewhat improved expansion properties during baking which often result in a drier crumb structure, and a crispier outer crust, which can also be said to give improved flavor to the baked product.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor