Author Topic: A sobering look at today's commecial pizza business...  (Read 5738 times)

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Offline Essen1

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A sobering look at today's commecial pizza business...
« on: June 10, 2011, 10:48:33 PM »
This article is from last November but it's an interesting look behind big pizza companies, such as Papa John's, Domino's, Pizza Hut and how it affects other parts of the industry that are connected.

http://www.menshealth.com/nutrition/dominos-effect
Mike

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Re: A sobering look at today's commecial pizza business...
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2011, 11:01:28 PM »
Interesting, if depressing, read.

Thanks Mike.

Offline Essen1

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Re: A sobering look at today's commecial pizza business...
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2011, 11:09:52 PM »
Interesting, if depressing, read.

Thanks Mike.

I was amazed and somewhat disappointed, to be honest.

This article is one more reason to make your own pizza, choose your own ingredients and be in control of your personal health. Don't let all those "feel-good" and happy commercials on TV fool you.
Mike

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Offline dmcavanagh

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Re: A sobering look at today's commecial pizza business...
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2011, 11:30:33 PM »
If you want to be even more frustrated, read through one of the popular pizza publications like "Pizza Today". These companies are actually proud of their products. Unfortunately, their only passion is for the bottom line and the almighty dollar.

Offline chickenparm

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Re: A sobering look at today's commecial pizza business...
« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2011, 01:45:27 AM »
NO shock there...the money is in fast food.Most Americans today want it NOW and don't cook much at home anymore as well.Another example,McDonalds is always BUSY in my town I live in.There is always a long line of cars at the drive through,same with the other Burger chains.People,especially Americans,love fast food and eat it up 2-3 times a day.Its no shock the same folks are so fat and are obese.Chain fast food is what is feeding people today and they love it.

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: A sobering look at today's commecial pizza business...
« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2011, 08:47:50 AM »
Mike,

That is a very interesting article.

I can personally attest to the part of the article about Leprino's. When I was trying to reverse engineer the Papa John's pizza, I was unable to find much about the cheese, mainly because of the tight-lipped culture at Leprino's. The only useful item I found on their mozzarella cheese on their website is no longer there. And, unlike Grande, they do not post Nutrition Facts on their cheeses. You might be able to get it if you are in the trade and have a business need for it. But when I tried to speak with a sales person at Leprino's, I got nowhere. I ended up reading several of their many patents. I was trying to get as close as I could to a real Papa John's pizza but, to be honest, if Leprino's gave me some of the Papa John's cheese, I would not use it. It is a manufactured product that contains a fair number of things in it other than cheese.

As far as the number of cows whose milk is used to make mozzarella cheese is concerned, a while back when I was trying to reverse engineer Jet's pizza, based on the amount of mozzarella cheese that Gene Jetts said they used annually, I joked that Jet's had around 4000 cows on its payroll, lounging on mattresses and listening to opera. As it turns out, those cows produce milk that Grande uses to make mozzarella cheese for Jet's. At least it is pure mozzarella cheese. Grande does not use fillers or anything like that in their mozzarella cheeses.

Peter

Offline Essen1

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Re: A sobering look at today's commecial pizza business...
« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2011, 12:14:09 PM »
NO shock there...the money is in fast food.Most Americans today want it NOW and don't cook much at home anymore as well.Another example,McDonalds is always BUSY in my town I live in.There is always a long line of cars at the drive through,same with the other Burger chains.People,especially Americans,love fast food and eat it up 2-3 times a day.Its no shock the same folks are so fat and are obese.Chain fast food is what is feeding people today and they love it.



I have been wondering for quite some time now why the guys in Washington go after the big tobacco companies for giving people diseases related to smoking but not after the Fast Food industry for doing equally the same. 

Don't get me wrong, I love a good burger (not McD's, Burger King, etc) as much as everybody else but what the Fast Food industry is offering shouldn't even be called 'Food'. How can a meal that costs 1 buck be anything else but crap?

It's also a shame that people don't cook much anymore. To me, cooking is fun, relaxing and a great past time and I know exactly what goes into the dishes. Sad.
Mike

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Offline Essen1

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Re: A sobering look at today's commecial pizza business...
« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2011, 12:15:58 PM »
Mike,

That is a very interesting article.

I can personally attest to the part of the article about Leprino's. When I was trying to reverse engineer the Papa John's pizza, I was unable to find much about the cheese, mainly because of the tight-lipped culture at Leprino's. The only useful item I found on their mozzarella cheese on their website is no longer there. And, unlike Grande, they do not post Nutrition Facts on their cheeses. You might be able to get it if you are in the trade and have a business need for it. But when I tried to speak with a sales person at Leprino's, I got nowhere. I ended up reading several of their many patents. I was trying to get as close as I could to a real Papa John's pizza but, to be honest, if Leprino's gave me some of the Papa John's cheese, I would not use it. It is a manufactured product that contains a fair number of things in it other than cheese.

As far as the number of cows whose milk is used to make mozzarella cheese is concerned, a while back when I was trying to reverse engineer Jet's pizza, based on the amount of mozzarella cheese that Gene Jetts said they used annually, I joked that Jet's had around 4000 cows on its payroll, lounging on mattresses and listening to opera. As it turns out, those cows produce milk that Grande uses to make mozzarella cheese for Jet's. At least it is pure mozzarella cheese. Grande does not use fillers or anything like that in their mozzarella cheeses.

Peter

Peter,

How can Leprino get away with it? On the other hand, if they're that shady and guarded I wouldn't touch, much less eat, their cheese products with a 10ft flag pole.
Mike

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: A sobering look at today's commecial pizza business...
« Reply #8 on: June 11, 2011, 12:45:19 PM »
How can Leprino get away with it? On the other hand, if they're that shady and guarded I wouldn't touch, much less eat, their cheese products with a 10ft flag pole.


Mike,

Leprino's is a private company and does not sell at the retail level, so what you will get from them will be limited. They certainly are guarded but I would not say that they are shady in an improper or unethical sense. I'm sure somewhere there is information publicly available on their cheeses but I have not found it in my searches. If I were a pizza operator, I would imagine that I would get more information on their cheeses than I will get by just trying to talk to them as a consumer.

For better or worse, Leprino's stake in milk production and products made from that milk has made Jimmy Leprino a billionaire. He is #136 on the Forbes 2010 list of the 400 wealthiest Americans: http://www.forbes.com/profile/james-leprino.

Peter

Offline Essen1

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Re: A sobering look at today's commecial pizza business...
« Reply #9 on: June 11, 2011, 01:00:20 PM »
Peter,

I don't know how true this article is, but even if it has a small grain of truth to it, it's stunning...


From StuffUCanUse.com

Pizza Hut cheese is not just cheese, its silicone!

In this issue, writer John Bunting details how Pizza Huts cheese supplier Leprino Foods uses a silicone-based industrial chemical in the patented manufacturing of Pizza Cheese

That chemical Polymethylsiloxane has no FDA approval for use as a food ingredient.

Polymethylsiloxane is sold by Dow-Corning as Antifoam FG 10 .

This material is approved by the FDA for use in food plants only as an anti-foaming agent for boiler water.

In its patented manufacturing process, Leprino Foods liberally sprays Polydimethylsiloxane on cheese granules . Leprinos Pizza Cheese supplied to Pizza Huts contains about 900 parts per million of Polymethylsiloxane: 90 times higher residue concentration than FDA allows when Polymethylsiloxane is used as a boiler water anti- foaming agent.

Repeat: Polydimethylsiloxane has no FDA approval as a safe food ingredient. It is a violation of FDA rules to use an unapproved ingredient in human foods. Silicone is amazing stuff.

In its various forms, silicone may enhance the female anatomy (ala amply-endowed actress Pamela Anderson). Silicone products can caulk seams around the bathtub to seal out water. Silicone compounds are used for lubricants. However, using silicone products in human foods is a novel, if extra-legal, application.

Leprino Foods, the worlds largest Italian cheese manufacturer, is the nearly exclusive supplier of Pizza Cheese to the 6000+ Pizza Hut restaurants in the U.S. Leprino is based in Denver, Colorado. To control costs (and boost profits), Leprino Foods uses patented manufacturing processes that add large volumes of water, salt and food starch to so-called granules of Pizza Cheese prior to flash-freezing.

Food starch is a particularly profitable addition to processed foods, since food starch holds ten times its own weight in water.

All that food starch, water and salt in the Leprinos Pizza Cheese creates problems for both cooking and refrigerated shelf-life. To solve these cooking problems, Leprinos patented process for making cheese granules sprays 1.75 parts of a water-based spray containing 0.05% Dow-Corning Antifoam FG 10 for each 100 parts cheese.

Yield: 900 parts per million of Antifoam FG 10 (generically known as Polydimethylsiloxane) in the Pizza Cheese that Leprino sells to Pizza Hut. Polydimethylsiloxane is approved by FDA in food industry use only as an anti-foaming agent for boiler water in plants processing non-standardized foods. FDA permits no use of Dow-Corning Antifoam FG 10 directly in or on foods. FDA does allow up to 10 parts per million of Polydimethylsiloxane residues in food products, as residue from the products use as a boiler water anti-foaming agent. The 900 ppm of Polydimethylsiloxane in Leprinos Pizza Cheese that Pizza Hut puts on its pizzas is 90 times FDAs legal limit for indirect residues of that chemical in food products.

Follow the trail of evidence Trace the evidence from Pizza Hut back to Leprino Foods patents. Start with an empty box of Pizza Cheese liberated from a dumpster behind a Pizza Hut. The contents were Pizza Huts Pizza Cheese Weight (when full): 15 lbs.

The box contains a statement noting the product is packaged exclusively for use by Pizza Hut Inc., its franchises and licensees Leprino Foods is obviously the supplier. The USDA plant number (identifying the cheese plant at which the product was made) is Plant No. 26-930

Thats Leprinos plant at Allendale, Michigan. The box also notes U.S. Patent No. 4894245 and other patents pending Leprino Foods received U.S. patent #4894245 for coated cheese granules in 1990 (among many other cheesy patents that Leprino holds). That patents abstract states: Coated frozen cheese granules are prepared by freezing the granules and applying an aqueous coating containing one or more modifying additives.

On baking the cheese the additives in the frozen coatings distribute throughout the cheese to obtain modifications of flavor and other properties The abstract from Leprino patent #4894245 clearly states that the aqueous coating (Polymethylsiloxane) is contained in the cheese of the finished, cooked pizza silicone-based substance in the cheese atop Pizza Hut pizzas. Leprino patent #494245 reveals detailed information about the role of the cheese emulsifiers:

When the coated frozen cheese is applied to pizzas and baked thereon, the coatings will liquify first. This permits the flavor additive and/or emulsi- fier to spread over and into the cheese particles as their outer surfaces become thawed . . . Cheese emulsifiers applied in this way can function to soften the outer portions of the cheese granules. This will improve melting and fusing of the granules

Leprino patent #494245 targets the emulsifier: A silicone emulsifier (Dow Corning FG-10) is mixed with water to form a 0.05% emulsifier solution. This solution is sprayed on the frozen cheese granules at a rate of 1.75 parts of solution per 100 parts by weight of cheese. This should achieve a final content of around 0.09% emulsifier on the cheese No compliance with mandatory GRAS rules The federal Food and Drug Administration re- quires ingredients used in human foods to comply with the Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) rules, which specify that each food ingredient developed after 1958 must meet exacting safety tests. Polydimethylsiloxane does not appear on FDAs Web site as a GRAS-approved food ingredient.

A call to Dow-Corning headquarters in Midland, Michigan yielded the statement that no Dow products complied with GRAS. However, information faxed by a Dow-Corning representative stated: Dow-Corning Antifoam FG 10 complies with FDA regulation 21 CFR.173.310, which covers secondary direct food additives used as defoaming agents and allows concentration of up to 10 parts per mil- lion active silicone (Polydimethylsiloxane) in non standardized foods

Section 173.310 is limited to boiler water additives in food processing plants and has nothing to do with cheese or cheese-type products that a consumer might ingest.

Clearly, Leprino Foods use of Dow-Corning Antifoam FG 10 as an agent contained in an aqueous solution sprayed directly on cheese granules does not conform with FDA's rules governing ingredients used in human foods.



Now, I don't want to paint a really grim picture of Leprino Foods and I'm certainly no chemist; however those companies, if the above holds some truth, make billions by providing subpar quality ingredients.

Nah, I think I'll stick with my home cooking for now... ;)
Mike

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: A sobering look at today's commecial pizza business...
« Reply #10 on: June 11, 2011, 09:05:44 PM »
Mike,

That is a matter that has been bouncing around the Internet for at least five years. I first became aware of it a few years ago when I was trying to reverse the cheese part of the Papa John's pizza. I became aware of the polydimethylsiloxane allegations at the tipthepizzaguy website at http://tipthepizzaguy.com/discussion/thread.php?num=8690&ip=1&f=all. As best I can recall, Leprino's denied that it was using polydimethylsiloxane in its pizza cheeses even though it was mentioned in an old patent. I do not think that Leprino's was cited for anything from a legal standpoint.

Peter

Offline chickenparm

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Re: A sobering look at today's commecial pizza business...
« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2011, 10:02:26 PM »
Mike,
Just reading half of that made me sick to my stomach.I am by no means a health food nut,but thats truly disgusting to read about.It just seems like these companies are in search of the cheapest way to make synthetic,chemically enhanced-type of cheese and pass it off as something Real,Pure,or Whole.
 :(


-Bill

Offline Jet_deck

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Re: A sobering look at today's commecial pizza business...
« Reply #12 on: June 11, 2011, 10:55:42 PM »
Mike,

 I do not think that Leprino's was cited for anything from a legal standpoint.

Peter


It does appear that Leprino's is able to produce a product with the "Real" label for at least one of their customers.  Fourth picture down.
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12806.msg124446.html#msg124446

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Offline Lespaul20

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Re: A sobering look at today's commecial pizza business...
« Reply #13 on: June 12, 2011, 11:14:03 AM »
Interesting article but with every other health related publication they have annoying amounts of pretentious bias in their writing. I can't say I'm surprised by any part of the article; It's been happening across all industries. It's nothing new.

I think it's just as important to look at the consumers of mass-produced foods. They are contributing to the downfall of quality food just as much as the producers.

Offline Essen1

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Re: A sobering look at today's commecial pizza business...
« Reply #14 on: June 12, 2011, 01:20:22 PM »
Mike,

That is a matter that has been bouncing around the Internet for at least five years. I first became aware of it a few years ago when I was trying to reverse the cheese part of the Papa John's pizza. I became aware of the polydimethylsiloxane allegations at the tipthepizzaguy website at http://tipthepizzaguy.com/discussion/thread.php?num=8690&ip=1&f=all. As best I can recall, Leprino's denied that it was using polydimethylsiloxane in its pizza cheeses even though it was mentioned in an old patent. I do not think that Leprino's was cited for anything from a legal standpoint.

Peter


I'm not here to discredit Leprino's or give them a bad name. The may be a fine company with a vast array of cheese products. However, I don't know how ethical it is from all these companies to basically shortcut the quality in their products and then pass those products on to the consumer, which in turn can create wide range of health problems if the product, in this case fast food chain pizzas, is abused.

And just like Lespaul20 said, the consumers who buy those products are also partially to blame. As long as there's a demand, there's a supply and if the quality suffers along the way, well tough luck I guess.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not a health fanatic, either, but I think a certain quality standard for mass produced foods, whether it's a bag of frozen chicken wings, chain pizzas or a triple whopper with bacon and cheese, should be there.

On the other hand, if it weren't for the low prices at which some of those foods are offered some low-income families would starve.

And just for s#$*s and giggles... http://www.picsroll.com/2011/01/real-face-of-fast-food-burgers.html
Mike

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Offline olsonmatt

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Re: A sobering look at today's commecial pizza business...
« Reply #15 on: June 14, 2011, 11:26:57 AM »
Thanks for posting this.  It's something so many people don't even think about. 

Offline VINNYB13

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Re: A sobering look at today's commecial pizza business...
« Reply #16 on: October 19, 2011, 08:13:46 AM »
here's the problem,
pizza was brought here from italy made from fine flour, great italian tomatoes, and great italian cheeses but of course we here had to mess with it just like every other ethnic food we just cant leave it the way it was brought here.
now you have pizza chain owners who arent italian who know nothing about pizza all they know is call a distibutor give me the cheapest flour, tomatoes and cheese you have and we'll put somebody in the kitchen to follow a recipe we bought who knows nothing about pizza making and of course you get slop pizza
fyi- i will not even stop at a pizza place if it doesn't have an italian name trust me

Online scott123

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Re: A sobering look at today's commecial pizza business...
« Reply #17 on: October 19, 2011, 09:40:24 AM »
Vinny, I agree that American chains are ruining pizza, but I heartily disagree that Americans didn't, at some point, improve upon pizza or that great pizzerias, at the present time, have to be run by Italians.

When pizza was 'brought' here, it was expensive and scarce.  It was American ingenuity and drive that mass produced the deck oven and made pizza available for many, and it was the second and third generation Italian Americans that fine tuned pizza to perfection to work with these ovens.  It was also American (most likely midwestern) scientists that developed flours that performed better at these lower temps.

Lorenzos is a shining testament of what America did for pizza. Pre-chain American pizza is the best food the world has ever seen (imho  ;) ).  For the last 30 years, the chains have been ruining pizza, but, in no way has America ruined pizza from the time when it was brought here.

And the idea that in order for a pizzeria to be great, the owner has to be Italian, is preposterous. 30 years ago, maybe, but not today.  I know plenty of Italian Americans that don't know the first thing about making great pizza and I know plenty of non Italian Americans that know everything and apply this knowledge masterfully.  If you were down in Tampa and walked by Wood Fired Pizza, owned by Peter Taylor, without going in, you'd be seriously missing out.  If you were in Portland and didn't swing by Brian Spangler's Apizza Scholls, again, your preconceptions would be doing you a great disservice. At this point, great pizza has nothing to do with race.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: A sobering look at today's commecial pizza business...
« Reply #18 on: October 19, 2011, 10:12:13 AM »
When you're feeding the masses, that's how it is done. Personally, I'm more concerned about some of the big box wholesale stores putting a vast array of different types of stores and businesses out of of business.
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Offline VINNYB13

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Re: A sobering look at today's commecial pizza business...
« Reply #19 on: October 19, 2011, 01:00:45 PM »
yes i agree i didnt mean to disrespect anyone and iam sure that there are plenty non italian owners but i will bet that they learned the business, they learned about different tomatoes
( sorry everyone Iam an Italian food distributor in Philly and we call it gravy ) and how to make it, the difference in cheese's and flour they didnt just say there is a lot of money to be made in the pizza business and all i have to do is buy these ingredients and throw them together. they probably take pride in their pizza and the comments they get on them.

iam 100% italian if i suddenly decided to open a jewish deli i would learn the business learn the different cuts and how to prepare corned beef, pastrami i wouldnt just open one up i guess what iam saying if your gonna open a pizza business learn it , dont just throw some ingredients together and think the more cheese you throw on it, it would taste better.

 i have an asian that owns a italain restaurant i service and it is great he worked in one for years and learned it , i also have who said dont care where the tomato is from he wants the cheapest ones he can find ( his gravy is like ketchup)

so just take pride in your pizza


 

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