Author Topic: Craig's Neapolitan Garage  (Read 169225 times)

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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1320 on: June 03, 2013, 03:40:33 PM »
The pies are getting about 40 seconds on the deck and 10 in the dome. This is a typical undercarriage (from the sopressata pie above).
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1321 on: June 03, 2013, 03:42:07 PM »
Beautiful pizzas! Love the long chives laid across the pizza.

Thank you! Fresh cut from the garden. That is without a doubt one of my all-time favorite pies. It's my wife's favorite. John D. outdid himself with the concept.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline BrickStoneOven

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Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1322 on: June 03, 2013, 04:10:12 PM »
Craig, how did you like the tomatoes or do you want to try them couple more times before you give an opinion?

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1323 on: June 03, 2013, 04:23:03 PM »
Craig, how did you like the tomatoes or do you want to try them couple more times before you give an opinion?


I really liked them a lot, but probably not for pizza. I posted more on it here: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,25450.msg257652.html#msg257652
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1324 on: June 03, 2013, 04:23:06 PM »
I am getting sick I seeing perfection from you Craig. I love the puffy crusts you get. Very reminiscent of Ciro Salvo.

John

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1325 on: June 03, 2013, 04:23:45 PM »
I am getting sick I seeing perfection from you Craig. I love the puffy crusts you get. Very reminiscent of Ciro Salvo.

John

You are way too kind. But I'll take it! ;D
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline Chaze215

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Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1326 on: June 03, 2013, 06:05:05 PM »
The pies look great as always Craig! Glad you enjoyed the Sclafani tomatoes.
Your pies look similar to the one below which I had yesterday at a festival  :-D
Chaz

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1327 on: June 03, 2013, 06:13:41 PM »
The pies look great as always Craig! Glad you enjoyed the Sclafani tomatoes.
Your pies look similar to the one below which I had yesterday at a festival  :-D
Cockeye cut.  ;D
I know you mean well Chaz...but paleeez man! She ain't even close.  :-\

Out of curiosity; how much they charge for that pie? For most ordinary places it really doesn't look bad at all.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2013, 06:16:22 PM by Chicago Bob »
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1328 on: June 03, 2013, 06:23:50 PM »
The pies look great as always Craig! Glad you enjoyed the Sclafani tomatoes.
Your pies look similar to the one below which I had yesterday at a festival  :-D

I hope you mean the look similar because my Margherita is also red, white, and green.  :(
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline derricktung

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Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1329 on: June 03, 2013, 06:28:46 PM »
I hope you mean the look similar because my Margherita is also red, white, and green.  :(

Sounds like you took some offense at that one.. ;)  The pie Chaze took a pic of looks decidedly more NY than Neapolitan IMHO.  It's definitely not as pretty as your pies.

Don't worry Craig, I think your pies are prettier.   ;D


Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1330 on: June 03, 2013, 06:53:46 PM »
OK, here's how you want to eat.... >:D
Before:innocence
After:bliss   ;D
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1331 on: June 03, 2013, 11:19:46 PM »
This is 61%HR, 2.8% salt, 1.7% culture (a little bit too much), 24 hours at 64F bulk + 24 hours at 64F balls. The dough was close to 64F when baked. Bake times were all ~50 seconds.

These pies used Sclafani crushed tomatoes (28oz cut with 1/2C water and a healthy pinch of salt).

Dear Craig, your pizzas are impressive as usual. Someday, I love to experience them in person.

Omid
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Chaze215

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Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1332 on: June 04, 2013, 06:34:34 AM »
I hope you mean the look similar because my Margherita is also red, white, and green.  :(

The colors are the ONLY similarity! Just to clarify, I was not impressed at all with the pie I had and am always impressed with your pies Craig.
Bob, you're right, they arent even close. I was being sarcastic which is why i put the  :-D after my post...lol That pie was $9.
Chaz

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1333 on: June 04, 2013, 08:50:39 AM »
I was being sarcastic which is why i put the  :-D after my post...lol That pie was $9.
Chaze,

I know where you are coming from.

For years, I have been an observer in my role as a Moderator of how members express themselves using emoticons as well as time honored practices such as sarcasm, satire and humor. I have come to the conclusion that these forms of expression do not always convey what the writer intended.

As a result of my observations, and using emoticons as an example, I do not use anywhere near the number that most other members use, and I use them sparingly and only when they reflect my actual state at the time I post (like laughing or smiling). I personally would rather use carefully chosen words to convey what I want to say rather than using emoticons, even with the very large number of emoticons that are available in the emoticon universe and their many gradations and varied expressions.

I also try to avoid sarcasm, and sometimes have to bite my tongue to refrain from doing so, since I have learned that most people do not respond well to sarcasm that is directed against them and especially if it puts them in a bad light. Also, I have learned that some people take whatever you say or do literally, whether it is the use of particular emoticons, sarcasm or humor, and completely miss the effect that was intended. The reality is that there are some people who take just about everything literally. For those people, emoticons may well be the best way to let them know your state of mind since words alone may not be enough. Satire and tongue-in-cheek expressions often fail for this reason.

I will confess to attempts at humor, to lighten things up and hopefully make someone laugh, and because I find humor to be an intellectually challenging exercise, but I have concluded that humor is very hard to convey well in the written word and not be misconstrued. In my experience, to be effective, attempts at humor have to be clear, obvious and unambiguous. It will also work best with people who also have a sense of humor.

In the real world, there are fewer misunderstandings than in the virtual world because people may know you personally and how you express yourself, your physical mannerisms and facial expressions and tone, the extent of your intellect, and your sense of humor. You may also know each other's personal sensitivities and taboo subjects. It is hard to replace these with words and emoticons when you don't know the people personally.

Peter

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1334 on: June 04, 2013, 08:55:44 AM »
The colors are the ONLY similarity! Just to clarify, I was not impressed at all with the pie I had and am always impressed with your pies Craig.
Bob, you're right, they arent even close. I was being sarcastic which is why i put the  :-D after my post...lol That pie was $9.

I figured that was probably the case.  No worries.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1335 on: June 04, 2013, 09:02:11 AM »
Chaze,

I know where you are coming from.

For years, I have been an observer in my role as a Moderator of how members express themselves using emoticons as well as time honored practices such as sarcasm, satire and humor. I have come to the conclusion that these forms of expression do not always convey what the writer intended.

As a result of my observations, and using emoticons as an example, I do not use anywhere near the number that most other members use, and I use them sparingly and only when they reflect my actual state at the time I post (like laughing or smiling). I personally would rather use carefully chosen words to convey what I want to say rather than using emoticons, even with the very large number of emoticons that are available in the emoticon universe and their many gradations and varied expressions.

I also try to avoid sarcasm, and sometimes have to bite my tongue to refrain from doing so, since I have learned that most people do not respond well to sarcasm that is directed against them and especially if it puts them in a bad light. Also, I have learned that some people take whatever you say or do literally, whether it is the use of particular emoticons, sarcasm or humor, and completely miss the effect that was intended. The reality is that there are some people who take just about everything literally. For those people, emoticons may well be the best way to let them know your state of mind since words alone may not be enough. Satire and tongue-in-cheek expressions often fail for this reason.

I will confess to attempts at humor, to lighten things up and hopefully make someone laugh, and because I find humor to be an intellectually challenging exercise, but I have concluded that humor is very hard to convey well in the written word and not be misconstrued. In my experience, to be effective, attempts at humor have to be clear, obvious and unambiguous. It will also work best with people who also have a sense of humor.

In the real world, there are fewer misunderstandings than in the virtual world because people may know you personally and how you express yourself, your physical mannerisms and facial expressions and tone, the extent of your intellect, and your sense of humor. You may also know each other's personal sensitivities and taboo subjects. It is hard to replace these with words and emoticons when you don't know the people personally.

Peter

I know I've put my food in my mouth a couple times here trying to be funny.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline Serpentelli

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Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1336 on: June 04, 2013, 10:55:51 AM »
Chaze,

I know where you are coming from.

For years, I have been an observer in my role as a Moderator of how members express themselves using emoticons as well as time honored practices such as sarcasm, satire and humor. I have come to the conclusion that these forms of expression do not always convey what the writer intended.

As a result of my observations, and using emoticons as an example, I do not use anywhere near the number that most other members use, and I use them sparingly and only when they reflect my actual state at the time I post (like laughing or smiling). I personally would rather use carefully chosen words to convey what I want to say rather than using emoticons, even with the very large number of emoticons that are available in the emoticon universe and their many gradations and varied expressions.

I also try to avoid sarcasm, and sometimes have to bite my tongue to refrain from doing so, since I have learned that most people do not respond well to sarcasm that is directed against them and especially if it puts them in a bad light. Also, I have learned that some people take whatever you say or do literally, whether it is the use of particular emoticons, sarcasm or humor, and completely miss the effect that was intended. The reality is that there are some people who take just about everything literally. For those people, emoticons may well be the best way to let them know your state of mind since words alone may not be enough. Satire and tongue-in-cheek expressions often fail for this reason.

I will confess to attempts at humor, to lighten things up and hopefully make someone laugh, and because I find humor to be an intellectually challenging exercise, but I have concluded that humor is very hard to convey well in the written word and not be misconstrued. In my experience, to be effective, attempts at humor have to be clear, obvious and unambiguous. It will also work best with people who also have a sense of humor.

In the real world, there are fewer misunderstandings than in the virtual world because people may know you personally and how you express yourself, your physical mannerisms and facial expressions and tone, the extent of your intellect, and your sense of humor. You may also know each other's personal sensitivities and taboo subjects. It is hard to replace these with words and emoticons when you don't know the people personally.

Peter

Pete,

I have copied and pasted your response to my hard drive, and I plan on sending it to some colleagues and family members. It is a very thoughtful and non-judgmental explanation of your view (from a moderator's standpoint) as to how to best use humor in the virtual world. I particularly like your explanation of WHY you like to use humor, and I guess that I had never considered it to be "intellectually challenging".

Your response to Chaze's comment was a very kind one, and I'm sure he appreciates it. Personally speaking, I am really impressed that you took the time out of your day to help not just Chaze, but all of us here to communicate more effectively!

John K

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1337 on: June 04, 2013, 11:47:46 AM »
Thank you John. The fact that I have to look at every new post in my role as Moderator gives me a broader picture of life on an online community than most people will get who do not read as many posts as I do. I also see the many and varied ways that people express themselves and how others react to such expressions. Even harmless statements can be misconstrued and turn molehills into mountains. 

On the matter of humor, I recall one member who was (and still is) a Brit and who posted something that he thought was funny from his perspective as a British citizen. Unfortunately, the target for his humor, an American, did not see the humor in his remarks and personally attacked the Brit. I had to quell the fracas that ensued, and to calm down the Brit with PMs. That demonstated to me that there is an international component to humor and that it is not univeral.

Peter

Offline Chaze215

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Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1338 on: June 04, 2013, 03:49:39 PM »
Pete, I appreciate your well thought out reply. From here on out I will think twice about what I had written in a reply or OP. Thanks!
Craig, I apologize if my comments were taken out of context with my attempt at some sarcasm/humor. So, just to get it straight, the pie I had stunk and Im always impressed by the look of your pies and wish I could have one for myself  ;D
Chaz

Offline Chaze215

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Re: Craig's Neapolitan Garage
« Reply #1339 on: June 04, 2013, 04:00:45 PM »
Pete, your story of the Brit and the American reminded me of a story my patient told me of when she first came to this country from the UK. It was her first job here in America and her boss was having a real crappy day. So, as he was leaving for the night and saying goodbye to her, she said to him "Have a goodnight. Keep your pecker up!". In British sayings, "keep your pecker up" is like saying here "keep your chin up". She told me she didnt even give it a second thought about what she said because it was very common for the Brits to say this. Needless to say,  there was a little confusion after that comment  :-D
Chaz