Author Topic: Dough climbing the dough hook  (Read 421 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Chaze215

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 615
  • Location: Jersey Shore
Re: Dough climbing the dough hook
« Reply #20 on: April 13, 2014, 06:39:47 AM »
In my small home Kitchen Aid with the "C" hook it doesn't matter if you have a small, medium or large  dough, they all want to climb the hook!

Does spraying the hook help like you suggested?
Chaz


Offline dmcavanagh

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1866
  • Location: Glenmont, NY
Re: Dough climbing the dough hook
« Reply #21 on: April 13, 2014, 12:38:08 PM »
to an extent, but it doesn't eliminate the problem completely.

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 836
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
Re: Dough climbing the dough hook
« Reply #22 on: April 14, 2014, 08:15:07 AM »
Chaze;
You're using an A-200 or AS-200/20-quart mixer. Congratulations for having a great mixer!
The problem you are experiencing stems from the fact that you are using a regular "J" hook instead of a reverse spiral dough mixing arm. The reverse spiral will completely eliminate the problem.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline Chaze215

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 615
  • Location: Jersey Shore
Re: Dough climbing the dough hook
« Reply #23 on: April 14, 2014, 06:15:37 PM »
Tom, thanks for your reply. I'm using the A200 Hobart. Is one model better than the other? I'm awaiting a return call from the guy I bought the mixer from to see if he has a spiral hook I can swap out. Thanks for everyone's help in figuring out my problem. I will keep you all posted!
Chaz

Online norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 20220
  • Location: Dutch Country, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Dough climbing the dough hook
« Reply #24 on: April 14, 2014, 06:31:21 PM »
Chaze,

I took a photo of what the dough hook looks like for my Hobart while I was at market today.  I know you already have it figured out though.  Best of luck in getting the spiral hook!

Norma 
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Chaze215

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 615
  • Location: Jersey Shore
Re: Dough climbing the dough hook
« Reply #25 on: April 14, 2014, 07:08:30 PM »
Thanks for taking the time to take a pic for me Norma! That's exactly what I need.
Chaz

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 836
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
Re: Dough climbing the dough hook
« Reply #26 on: Yesterday at 10:53:24 AM »
Chaze;
There are three versions of the 20-quart Hobart bench top mixer, the A-200, the AS-200 and the AS-200-T The only difference is that the "S" designation is for "stir". and the "T" designation stands for "timed" as this mixer has a timer. The "S" designation mixers have a very slow (half speed) stirring speed that might be useful when making a bowl of cake batter to prevent splash out, or to prevent dusting such as is commonly encountered when a fermented sponge is placed in the bowl followed by the remainder of the flour and dry ingredients. However, Now, I don't know if this is sanctioned by Hobart, but when I'm faced with these issues and all I've got is an A-200 I just quickly flip the switch between on and off, like switching a light switch for a few revolutions and then mix in low (#1) speed until I can go to a higher speed without dusting everything within a 5-foot radius of the mixer. Don't worry about looking for an AS-200, you already have a gem of a mixer.
By the way, a slightly smaller, but equally as good of a mixer is the Hobart A-120/AS-120 mixer. This mixer is just a slightly smaller version of the A-200 having a 12-quart bowl capacity. Reverse spiral hooks are available for this mixer too as are a wide assortment of other mixing agitators, and if your mixer has the optional attachment head, you can buy a "pelican head" attachment for cutting, slicing, etc. Due to the great number of attachments available for these mixers, I have been known to refer to them as the grown man's, or woman's Barbie Doll.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline waltertore

  • Vendor
  • *
  • Posts: 1046
  • Location: granville ohio
    • The Smiling With Hope Bakery
Re: Dough climbing the dough hook
« Reply #27 on: Yesterday at 11:25:57 AM »
Chaze;
There are three versions of the 20-quart Hobart bench top mixer, the A-200, the AS-200 and the AS-200-T The only difference is that the "S" designation is for "stir". and the "T" designation stands for "timed" as this mixer has a timer. The "S" designation mixers have a very slow (half speed) stirring speed that might be useful when making a bowl of cake batter to prevent splash out, or to prevent dusting such as is commonly encountered when a fermented sponge is placed in the bowl followed by the remainder of the flour and dry ingredients. However, Now, I don't know if this is sanctioned by Hobart, but when I'm faced with these issues and all I've got is an A-200 I just quickly flip the switch between on and off, like switching a light switch for a few revolutions and then mix in low (#1) speed until I can go to a higher speed without dusting everything within a 5-foot radius of the mixer. Don't worry about looking for an AS-200, you already have a gem of a mixer.
By the way, a slightly smaller, but equally as good of a mixer is the Hobart A-120/AS-120 mixer. This mixer is just a slightly smaller version of the A-200 having a 12-quart bowl capacity. Reverse spiral hooks are available for this mixer too as are a wide assortment of other mixing agitators, and if your mixer has the optional attachment head, you can buy a "pelican head" attachment for cutting, slicing, etc. Due to the great number of attachments available for these mixers, I have been known to refer to them as the grown man's, or woman's Barbie Doll.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Tom: We use 2 - A-200t mixers for baking applications and also toggle back and forth until things come together to the point of not throwing flour everywhere but regardless they tend to make a mess by the end of the day.   Walter
The Smiling With Hope Bakery- A bakery with a purpose
http://www.newarkadvocate.com/article/20140124/NEWS01/301240031/Bakery-run-by-students-disabilities-earns-pizza-profile

Spontobeat- the spontaneous music concept I have created and how I spontaneously live my life   http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=157137 200 of my most current songs http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=157137&content=widgets

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 836
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
Re: Dough climbing the dough hook
« Reply #28 on: Yesterday at 11:48:51 AM »
Walter;
Have you looked at using a splash cover? They are not perfect, but they do reduce a lot of the splash out and to some extent they also control some of the annoying dusting that comes when making bread and pizza doughs.
There are also some little tricks that I've picked up on over the years to reduce dusting too, for example, if you make a sponge dough, rather than putting the sponge in first, and the dry ingredients on top of it, add the water first, then add the dough side ingredients and mix at low speed for a few seconds, then add the sponge and mix as normal. For pizza doughs add the water first, then add the flour and other dry ingredients, a few seconds of stir or jogging will significantly reduce dusting, especially whit a splash cover.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline waltertore

  • Vendor
  • *
  • Posts: 1046
  • Location: granville ohio
    • The Smiling With Hope Bakery
Re: Dough climbing the dough hook
« Reply #29 on: Yesterday at 03:36:33 PM »
Walter;
Have you looked at using a splash cover? They are not perfect, but they do reduce a lot of the splash out and to some extent they also control some of the annoying dusting that comes when making bread and pizza doughs.
There are also some little tricks that I've picked up on over the years to reduce dusting too, for example, if you make a sponge dough, rather than putting the sponge in first, and the dry ingredients on top of it, add the water first, then add the dough side ingredients and mix at low speed for a few seconds, then add the sponge and mix as normal. For pizza doughs add the water first, then add the flour and other dry ingredients, a few seconds of stir or jogging will significantly reduce dusting, especially whit a splash cover.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Tom:  Thanks for that splash cover info.  We always add liquids first for our bread, pizza, dog biscuits doughes and pulse when they are loaded with paddle based flour heavy recipes until it comes together.  We really don't make much of a mess except when it gets left on speed 2 and really big with speed 3.............. :)   Walter
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 03:41:59 PM by waltertore »
The Smiling With Hope Bakery- A bakery with a purpose
http://www.newarkadvocate.com/article/20140124/NEWS01/301240031/Bakery-run-by-students-disabilities-earns-pizza-profile

Spontobeat- the spontaneous music concept I have created and how I spontaneously live my life   http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=157137 200 of my most current songs http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=157137&content=widgets


 

pizzapan