Author Topic: HELP!!!! Opening a restaurant next week. Made a practice batch of dough and it +  (Read 805 times)

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Offline amooola

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has risen double its size in the span of 2 hours. I followed this recipe:

25lb flour
6 quarts water
8 oz sugar
7 oz salt
20 oz evoo
4 oz yeast

I cut the batch in half and placed them in two dough proofing boxes.
Are the boxes too small or did I go wrong in the recipe? I'd appreciate it if someone could help, I wouldnt mind speaking over the phone either. 



Offline deb415611

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some things that will help figure out what is wrong:

what type of yeast did you use

water temp

what time period did you want the dough to be ready in?

what type of pizza are you trying to make?

If I did calcs correct this would be (i'm not sure i have the water conversion correct):

flour 100%
water 48%
sugar 2%
salt 1.75%
evoo  5%
yeast 1%


Offline mkevenson

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Good thing you made a practice dough! But only a week before opening?  :o Hope pizza is not your #1 offering! :'(

Just based on my home kitchen, I would say tooooo much yeast. Look at some of the recipes here, or ask your friends who make pizza what they use.

Good luck!

Mark
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Offline widespreadpizza

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the original recipe specified cake or fresh yeast

Offline amooola

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Deb, thanks so much for the response.

The yeast is active dry. The water temp was warm, around 110F. I would like the dough to be ready in 24 hours. The type of pizza we're going for is close to a NY style pizza, but with a crust that will stay crisp and hold up with added toppings.

I ran over to the restaurant (the pic of it overflowing was one my husband sent) and it turns out that the cooler was malfunctioning and the internal temp was 65F. I split the dough into 4 and placed them in 4 dough-proofing boxes.

I am not sure if the temp in the cooler is what threw it off, or if it is that I used too much yeast. I think I may try a batch tomorrow with 2 oz of ADY.

Any suggestions? Or any recipes I should give a try?

Offline amooola

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the original recipe specified cake or fresh yeast

Yes, I am going to make another batch using half the amount of yeast. Also, I mentioned in my other reply, it turns out the cooler was malfunctioning and the temperature in there was 65 degrees, so I think the temp and the overuse of yeast factored into the dough rising so quickly.

Offline deb415611

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for disclosure i am not a pro and only make pizza at home but here is what I see

the cooler at 65 degrees would definitely be a problem

I think your yeast is too much, marc commented the original recipe was cake yeast and that is different than ADY.  You may want to look at Craigs chart here http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,26831.msg285982.html#msg285982  read through the thread, it is meant to be a starting point not an absolute.  I think there is some discussion of what people have seen at the fridge temps.

Water temp - if I was using ADY I would only warm up enough to activate the yeast, then have the rest of the water either room temp or cold depending on your recipe and yeast amount.   You may want to switch to IDY then you don't have to go through an activation process

Not sure when you are planning on balling the dough but don't do it to close to when you are making pizza.  For a 24 hour dough i usually ball after mixing




Offline jkb

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The dough's no big deal, but it's a shame you had to throw out all that deli meat.

Offline David Esq.

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The dough's no big deal, but it's a shame you had to throw out all that deli meat.
Was that a friendly reminder for her to throw it out, because I did not see her suggesting that she did so....

Offline Mmmph

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I use those boxes for dough balls.
You need a deeper box/tub/bucket for bulk proofing.
« Last Edit: October 20, 2014, 03:17:36 PM by Mmmph »
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Offline c0mpl3x

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flour 100%
water 52%
sugar 2%
salt 1.75%
evoo  5%
yeast 1%

your recipe above. my recipe below

flour 100%
water 53-55%
sugar .5%
salt 1.75%
evoo 5%
yeast .25%

when proofing your yeast, proof it in a small portion of water. if you heat the entire water, the dough will be too warm and will continue to rise even though the outside is down to temp.

try proofing the yeast in a pint, or even a cup of water at 105f. add it to the rest of the recipe, with the oil added last, during mixing when the dough is juuuuuust incorporated. i don't know what flour you are using, but i assume you are using AP or bread flour?

with 2% sugar you have a lot of food for the yeast to feed on with the entire mass at yeast activation temps.   



some things that will help figure out what is wrong:

what type of yeast did you use

water temp

what time period did you want the dough to be ready in?

what type of pizza are you trying to make?

If I did calcs correct this would be (i'm not sure i have the water conversion correct):

flour 100%
water 47%
sugar 2%
salt 1.75%
evoo  5%
yeast 1%

1 gallon of water is 8.61lbs. so 1.5 gallons (6 quarts) would be 12.91lbs or roughly 51.x%hyd
« Last Edit: October 20, 2014, 08:15:04 PM by c0mpl3x »
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Offline SOIP

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Hi,
did you solve your problem? I your pizza coming out they way you want it to now?


 

pizzapan