Author Topic: Flour? Pizza Steel? Knock your socks off Pizza at home?  (Read 192 times)

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Offline ironj679

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Flour? Pizza Steel? Knock your socks off Pizza at home?
« on: Yesterday at 01:17:10 PM »
Hey Dough Masters,
I am starting a personal quest to become the best at home pizza maker I can be. I have a pizza steel and I can get the surface to 600 degrees.  I tried a Neapolitan pizza dough (by kenji) and it turned out pretty good, the crust cracked and seemed dry. 

I have sense stumbled upon this very site and found out about Caputo 00 flour.  Should I use this kind of flour instead of bakers flour that I have been using?

Any recipes for Neapolitan or NY dough that would win the hearts of my loved ones that eat my pizza that you would be willing to share?   

Thanks, I know I sound like a total noob.
I am (the dough calculator scares me!)
Thanks!
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 01:20:45 PM by ironj679 »


Offline HBolte

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Re: Flour? Pizza Steel? Knock your socks off Pizza at home?
« Reply #1 on: Yesterday at 01:28:15 PM »
For Neapolitan using 00 flour TXCraigs recipe is very good. You'll need 800F+ temps though.

« Last Edit: Today at 08:36:17 AM by HBolte »
Hans

Offline jsaras

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Re: Flour? Pizza Steel? Knock your socks off Pizza at home?
« Reply #2 on: Yesterday at 06:27:19 PM »
00 flour is not the answer, especially for your baking setup.  Start with GM Better for Bread Flour or King Arthur Bread Flour.  I REALLY wish the moderators would create a sticky regarding 00 flour as it comes up constantly. 

I would start with the Lehmann formulation with a hydration of 58%, no oil or sugar.  Keep the pizzas on the smaller side (11-13 inches) and use a thickness factor of 0.085 to start.   You can vary the formulation over time, adding 1-3% oil, sugar (1-2%) varying the salt up to 2.5% and increasing the hydration up to 64% max.   Don't move on until you think you've got a variation of the Lehmann dough that represents the best possible version of it you can make, which may turn out to be the one without sugar and oil. 

It took me a while before I stumbled upon the percentages that I like with my oven setup, but I now have a default "go-to" that I know will always produce the result I want. 
Things have never been more like today than they are right now.

Offline Essen1

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Re: Flour? Pizza Steel? Knock your socks off Pizza at home?
« Reply #3 on: Today at 12:14:30 AM »
Hey Dough Masters,
I am starting a personal quest to become the best at home pizza maker I can be. I have a pizza steel and I can get the surface to 600 degrees.  I tried a Neapolitan pizza dough (by kenji) and it turned out pretty good, the crust cracked and seemed dry. 

I have sense stumbled upon this very site and found out about Caputo 00 flour.  Should I use this kind of flour instead of bakers flour that I have been using?

Any recipes for Neapolitan or NY dough that would win the hearts of my loved ones that eat my pizza that you would be willing to share?   

Thanks, I know I sound like a total noob.
I am (the dough calculator scares me!)
Thanks!

Iron,

Couple of things.

Kenji is not the greatest source when it comes to pizza. He's hit 'n miss at best, although I do enjoy his posts on other food subjects. Some of them are good reads. But my question is why did it turn out good when the crust cracked and was dry? That's not good in my book.

Like Jonas mentioned, ditch the Caputo 00. Not applicable for a home oven.

If you want to become a great pizza maker at home you should get yourself educated and familiar with Baker's percentages and the dough calculator (DC) here on this site.

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/professional/bakers-percentage.html

Read, learn from it and try to incorporate this in your daily routine when measuring ingredients. Speaking of measuring, get a good scale such as the MyWeight KD-8000 (Amazon) and start measuring in grams.

That said, pick a generic NY-style recipe from the recipe page or one such as this:

http://www.pmq.com/Recipe-Bank/New-York-Style-Pizza-Dough

Plug the numbers (percentages) into the dough calculator and set the thickness factor at 0.085 or, for a 12" pie, to 340 grams. I'd start with a hydration (water content) of 60%, then scale up or down depending on your oven's performance. Lighter, crunchier crust = more water. Denser crust = less water. Dont worry too much in the beginning about the other ingredients. Like Robert Rodriguez, the movie director, said in his 10-minute cooking school videos...take one dish you really like and cook it over and over until you get really good at it.

Same goes for pizza dough. Pick a dough recipe and make it over and over again until you're really good at it and know its intricacies. Experiment with different oven temps, some higher, some lower and see how your dough handles those. My starting point with temps would be about 500 - 525 F.

I'm not a fan of pizza steels. At all.

I know it works for others which is great. For me, not so much. Buy a good, reliable high-quality pizza stone as well and compare the bakes on both surfaces. Also, invest in the right equipment such as wooden and metal peels, ladles, screens, pizza trays and perhaps dough boxes but a half-sheet cookie pan should work just fine to hold and retard a dough.

Here's a formula I just ran through the DC and should get you started. Like Jonas mentioned, get some Bread flour instead of the 00.

Flour (100%):
Water (60%):
IDY (.25%):
Salt (1.5%):
Oil (1%):
Sugar (2%):
Total (164.75%):
Single Ball:
416.87 g  |  14.7 oz | 0.92 lbs
250.12 g  |  8.82 oz | 0.55 lbs
1.04 g | 0.04 oz | 0 lbs | 0.35 tsp | 0.12 tbsp
6.25 g | 0.22 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.12 tsp | 0.37 tbsp
4.17 g | 0.15 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.93 tsp | 0.31 tbsp
8.34 g | 0.29 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.09 tsp | 0.7 tbsp
686.8 g | 24.23 oz | 1.51 lbs | TF = N/A
343.4 g | 12.11 oz | 0.76 lbs

I hope, I was able to help a bit. Good luck and I'm looking forward to seeing your results in the future.
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

Offline Essen1

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Re: Flour? Pizza Steel? Knock your socks off Pizza at home?
« Reply #4 on: Today at 12:47:59 AM »
Iron,

Forgot to mention one more thing...

Mixers.

Unless you are planning on hand-kneading your dough, invest in a good stand mixer. I had the Cuisinart SM-55 for years and got heavy use and great results out of it. I recently upgraded to a refurbished KitchenAid Pro 600 w/lift bowl feature for $249.00 on Overstock.com.

It delivers stellar results and mixes the dough properly.

Do not get a KA mixer, or any mixer for that matter, with a "C" hook since it only slaps the dough around. Make sure you'll get one with a spiral dough hook or a semi-spiral one such as the one the Cuisinart SM-55 .
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

Offline invertedisdead

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Re: Flour? Pizza Steel? Knock your socks off Pizza at home?
« Reply #5 on: Today at 06:27:26 PM »
I like all purpose flour for nearly-politan oven bakes.