Author Topic: Homebuild electric Pizza oven.  (Read 5244 times)

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Offline The Dub Oracle

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Homebuild electric Pizza oven.
« on: June 24, 2011, 04:38:56 AM »
Everyone knows the problem of the oven i think around here.
A normal over is to cold for baking good pizza, so you must have a proffesional oven to do so.
I first had a ferrari G3 oven that baked some good pizza's but i discovered that this oven is not that good as could be.
Its 1100 Watts on 220 Volt but bakes not really that good, in 6 minutes they are done (to long) but not evenly baked, and not that brown everywhere.
So i thought by myself ( i am electrician ) Why not build a oven by myself that will reach better temperatures in a more closed enviroment.
I am glad to say that i have sucseeded to do so and here is the end result ( a bit proud  ;D ).
In first mesurement the oven reached temperatures to 600 degrees ( 2500 Watts) , so i placed a external resistor from heating wire to tame the temperature.
The first pizza burned, but the second whas perfect, it took only 3 minutes and 15 seconds to bake it, it whas evenly brown and the dough rose better than ever before.
I have no picture of that pizza, but it will come later maybe.
Here is my oven.

http://i590.photobucket.com/albums/ss344/theduboracle/P1010447.jpg

http://i590.photobucket.com/albums/ss344/theduboracle/P1010444.jpg

http://i590.photobucket.com/albums/ss344/theduboracle/P1010440.jpg

http://i590.photobucket.com/albums/ss344/theduboracle/P1010442.jpg


http://i590.photobucket.com/albums/ss344/theduboracle/P1010441.jpg

http://i590.photobucket.com/albums/ss344/theduboracle/P1010446.jpg

http://i590.photobucket.com/albums/ss344/theduboracle/P1010445.jpg

http://i590.photobucket.com/albums/ss344/theduboracle/P1010443.jpg

As you can see i used 3cm durox blocks in a metal plate chamber and a second chamber around it with rockwool in between.
The heating wire i bought here,   http://www2.conrad.nl/goto.php?artikel=421201
I used 6.75 meters of this wire both on the top and the bottem of the oven connected paralel, the extra resistor wire is 1 meter in lenght made of 2 wires.
For 110 Volts you use simply 2 wires for the same Wattage, it will be the same lenght, the resistance must be lower because of lower voltage. The extra resistor must in that way be also half as long, but maybe also changed to find the right temperature.
I made sliders from steelgrips from the pizza plate, and placed the stone in for about 10 minutes at 400 degrees minutes before i placed the pizza on top
I just nailed the wire in the stone with crams made of nails.
The inside measures of the oven are 35H * 41D * 12H centimeters.
The pizza whas very crisp because the durox absorbes moist very good.
In total this costed me around 100 dollar while the same oven from the brand Diamond cost around 900 dollar.
Maybe it can be even cheaper than this when you use only durox blocks and glue them with heat resistant chement.
Than you only have to place the wire in the durox box, and place a stone in front as door.
I hope this info will be some help for the many pizza lovers.

Kind regards and inspiration.
Albert Oost.

And never fool around with electrics, contact someone that has understanding of it if you want to do the same as me.
« Last Edit: June 24, 2011, 04:54:34 AM by The Dub Oracle »


Offline wheelman

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Re: Homebuild electric Pizza oven.
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2011, 09:50:43 AM »
nice job Albert!  welcome aboard.  looking forward to seeing what comes out of there.
cheers
bill

Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Homebuild electric Pizza oven.
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2011, 10:19:03 AM »
Nice build Albert.  Lets see some pizzas!
Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends

Offline Ev

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Re: Homebuild electric Pizza oven.
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2011, 01:22:11 PM »
That's really cool. Definitely need to see some pizza!

Offline Tampa

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Re: Homebuild electric Pizza oven.
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2011, 03:20:24 PM »
Very nice.  Good for you.  Thanks for including the heating wire link.  Comparing your design with the commercial electric oven my neighbor has, your element has more wire and should result in fewer hotspots/more-even heating.  I like that.

You said the oven got to 600 degrees, I'm assuming that is centigrade right?  (About 1100F in the states)

With the bricks, how long did it take to warm up before throwing a pie?

Dave


Online tinroofrusted

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Re: Homebuild electric Pizza oven.
« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2011, 04:50:50 PM »
Fantastic invention!  I wish I had a working knowledge of electricity and I would make one of these. But I would probably burn my house down, making it quite a bit more expensive than $100!  I would love to see a picture of the pizza actually in the oven with the elements going, etc. 

Regards,

Tin Roof

Offline The Dub Oracle

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Re: Homebuild electric Pizza oven.
« Reply #6 on: June 24, 2011, 05:04:40 PM »
Very nice.  Good for you.  Thanks for including the heating wire link.  Comparing your design with the commercial electric oven my neighbor has, your element has more wire and should result in fewer hotspots/more-even heating.  I like that.

You said the oven got to 600 degrees, I'm assuming that is centigrade right?  (About 1100F in the states)

With the bricks, how long did it take to warm up before throwing a pie?

Dave



15 minutes it took to warm up, but i really dont know for sure, its just finished see.
It could be some over powered indeed, its now 2000 watts
But i discovered that the temperature quickly drops when you open the oven, it will take for sure more than 5 minutes to reach the temperature of 450 centigrade again , it stays at 350 or so, but never the less, with that temperature it still took 3,15 minutes to finish.
Profesional ovens have that to i think, when you open it temperature instandly drops very quickly.
It would be more difficult to get the bottem at the right temperature, that must be as brown as well.
I must do some more experimenting, its not a standard oven.
The temperature of the bottem is important, this bottem wil reach a to high temperature because of to mutch heating wire, a mistake.
The stone must be in midair, to reach the same temperature as the air i think.
I had also no tiles to cover the bottem with stone.
I still must perfect it.
It took me about 2 weeks to build with some delay, lots of metal work with no good equipment.
If someone also want to build this i would advice to build it some higher, so you can place a baking stone in the middle of the oven, my stone broke also because of to mutch heat differance with pizzabread on top.
But it works fine, you just must find out the right timing  and temperatures, i have also a multimeter thats measuring heat, it helped a lot

I will post a photo ofcause, just wait.

Offline The Dub Oracle

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Re: Homebuild electric Pizza oven.
« Reply #7 on: June 24, 2011, 05:43:38 PM »
A bit stupid of the heating wire i must say, the extra resistor i mean.
The lenght in this way without resistor must be ( recalculated ) 8.25 meter for each the top and bottem.
Connected parallel ofcause , for 110 volts homes 4 times 8.25 meter, 2 wires parallel top and bottem, 4 wires parallel in total.
Must be working very easy, and the stone in the middle.
I had also a measuring sensor inside the oven, i could measure it with closed doors.
For that money its even worth to buy that at a electronic store, its a normal multi meter that also measures heat.

Offline lennyk

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Re: Homebuild electric Pizza oven.
« Reply #8 on: June 24, 2011, 06:26:40 PM »
Nice build,

are you familiar with PID controllers ?
You can buy generic ones which you can use to control the elements.
Most commercial ovens use such controllers.
They are fairly easy to hookup and cost around $60 incl thermocouple and relay to run your heating elements.

Online scott123

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Re: Homebuild electric Pizza oven.
« Reply #9 on: June 25, 2011, 01:37:37 AM »
Albert, while I applaud your ingenuity and expertise, there's one flaw with your design that might be worth looking at.

'Durox' is aerated concrete aka 'insulating firebrick', correct?  When you hammer a nail into refractory, fractures, both visible and invisible, can form around the point of impact. As you use the oven, the nails, because they are in direct contact with the element, will heat up a little faster.  This translates into a slightly faster rate of expansion. Over time, the fractures could expand and you could see pieces of brick falling into the pizza.  If they fall on a cheese/sauce area they could easily go unnoticed and be consumed.  Aerated refractory, although softer than non aerated refractory, could still be hard on the teeth.

Another possibility, is that one of the nails might eventually loosen and fall.  That would be even more dangerous to consume.

Nails in refractory are perfectly fine for the bottom of the oven, but, for the top, I'd position the wire using another method.  Perhaps you could take some of the material they put in toasters, cut it into strips, using them as posts and zigzag the wire like a pasta chitarra.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3382/3614071331_bd9b5951aa_o.jpg

By the way, have you tried modding your G3 oven?  Quite a few people have modded them for faster bake times.  Compared to what you're doing here, I would think that would be a piece of cake.


Offline The Dub Oracle

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Re: Homebuild electric Pizza oven.
« Reply #10 on: June 25, 2011, 07:04:09 AM »
A PID controller ?
Thats new for me, but i looked for a thermostat, a normal one that has a sensor and just breaks the circuit if the temperature gets to high.
A PID controller does more if i understand it correctly, it also controles the current so the oven temperature is even more under control.
If i can bake a good pizza in this way i will spend not more money on it, but its a good idea for a oven when you want to bake pizza's constantly.

Falling nails, i thought of that to in what you say.
I just tryed this way i must say, time will tell.
Otherwise i will adapt the design, for example grooves were the wire is placed in without nails, and just hooked in carved edges.
I dont know if that even will work because the wire expands during heating.
There are many ways to do this, it will work at the end, i made it just in the simplest way.
But many thanx for the advice, i will look for more closely.
Before i break my tooth.

 
« Last Edit: June 29, 2011, 07:52:07 AM by The Dub Oracle »

Offline lennyk

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Re: Homebuild electric Pizza oven.
« Reply #11 on: June 25, 2011, 12:43:15 PM »
if you want to go the PID controller route check this site for an example install on a coffee machine
http://www.murphyslawonline.com/silvia
the Costco pizza machines also use PID controllers too, generic ones from what I have seen.
Some even come with a ramp up feature so it will accelerate the initial heatup

Offline The Dub Oracle

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Re: Homebuild electric Pizza oven.
« Reply #12 on: June 25, 2011, 01:46:44 PM »
Well, here are some pictures of the pizza of today.
Artissjoke, ham, salami, garlic, paprika, champinjons, wrong spelling because i am dutch but it will come over.
I also had pesto in the tomato saus, end the dough whas rising for about 5 hours for better taste.
I placed the stone 9 minutes in the oven at 450 degrees for per heating.
Baked for 3,45 minutes.
Tasted great, perfect balance.
I love those bubbles.


http://i590.photobucket.com/albums/ss344/theduboracle/2.jpg

http://i590.photobucket.com/albums/ss344/theduboracle/1.jpg

http://i590.photobucket.com/albums/ss344/theduboracle/3.jpg

http://i590.photobucket.com/albums/ss344/theduboracle/4.jpg

http://i590.photobucket.com/albums/ss344/theduboracle/P1010458.jpg

http://i590.photobucket.com/albums/ss344/theduboracle/P1010459.jpg

http://i590.photobucket.com/albums/ss344/theduboracle/P1010463.jpg

http://i590.photobucket.com/albums/ss344/theduboracle/P1010462.jpg


« Last Edit: June 25, 2011, 02:06:44 PM by The Dub Oracle »

Offline lennyk

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Re: Homebuild electric Pizza oven.
« Reply #13 on: June 25, 2011, 02:48:50 PM »
maybe you could put herrings too

Offline The Dub Oracle

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Re: Homebuild electric Pizza oven.
« Reply #14 on: June 25, 2011, 03:22:34 PM »
maybe you could put herrings too

The raw fish,  :-\
Bah, eeeeek.
Once had scrimp on a pizza, i nearly puked, but i love tuna champions gorgonzola.

Offline The Dub Oracle

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Re: Homebuild electric Pizza oven.
« Reply #15 on: June 25, 2011, 04:59:24 PM »
By the way, have you tried modding your G3 oven?  Quite a few people have modded them for faster bake times.  Compared to what you're doing here, I would think that would be a piece of cake.

I can not think of a way to do that.
But i whas busy with that i must say.
I bend the corners of the upperhalf lid down so that the oven whas more airtight.
But that did not work that wel.
Hou must place a ring or so that this will happen, then it should evenly brown as wel.
The air inside the G3 is not that hot, thats the problem, it only brows because of the heat radiation from the element above, its not the hot air as in a profesional oven.
The only way to get more power of it should be due to a transformator, a transformator that makes from 220 280 volt, technical possible.
There are also transformators where you can tune the voltage, but this one has to tune up, not down.

Online scott123

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Re: Homebuild electric Pizza oven.
« Reply #16 on: June 25, 2011, 06:03:35 PM »
I can not think of a way to do that.


The G3 Ferrari is very similar to the Deni 2100 oven and the Pizza Bella.  Here are threads on how those ovens can be modded:

Modifying a Deni 2100 (Pics)
Pizza Bella oven
Modding out my Pizza Bella: super results!
My "Elite NYC" Pie: Better and Better (PICS)

The G3 probably requires a slightly different approach, but I'm sure, with your skills, you can figure it out.

Offline The Dub Oracle

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Re: Homebuild electric Pizza oven.
« Reply #17 on: June 26, 2011, 05:54:30 AM »
The G3 Ferrari is very similar to the Deni 2100 oven and the Pizza Bella.  Here are threads on how those ovens can be modded:

Modifying a Deni 2100 (Pics)
Pizza Bella oven
Modding out my Pizza Bella: super results!
My "Elite NYC" Pie: Better and Better (PICS)

The G3 probably requires a slightly different approach, but I'm sure, with your skills, you can figure it out.


A lot to read, but i understand.
Its about that thermostat to be changed.
In fact my G3 has one to, but i dont use it, i turn it up to the maximum so the elements always work.
This thermostat only turns the elements off, om my G3 it has totally no use.
If the upper element does not work, the pizza will not bake above at all.
When i try to place a second pizza the problem is that the bottem will get to hot, it just burns because the bottem is getting hotter and hotter.
The thermostat should be for the bottem and not the top, that is a design failure.
But after 10 minutes pre heating all is just fine in baking, it works, even better when you close the lit before baking for a minute or so, you have more stored heat in the stone and the metals above.
You also must warm up the oven with a open lid, thats not told in the userguide, so my first pizza burned totally at the bottem.
The Deni oven as showed is mutch better than the G3 in all ways, it browns more evenly but you can still see that it browns by heat radiation and not with heat from hot air, you can measure what you want with a laser thermometer, but that stays about surface heat, its not about the hot air.
If you open the lid of such ovens, the air is just gone, it just browns with infrared radiation, you can clearly see that on the pictures.
My dough also wont rise that good in the G3, that Deni oven does a better job at it.
I think its about more hot air, as you can see on my pictures from my pizza it rised as hell and it is nice evenly brown, the burned burned spots are from bubbles, its not from burning because of heat radiation.
I think almost that with a good oven, with enough hot air, you dont have to make a outer rim at all on your dough, it wil rise anyway, the toppings will stop the hot air on getting at the inner dough, so it want rise that much as the rim does.
Thats what i saw on some youtube movies, they just flattend the dough evenly and wacked topping on top.
That is what i think, i stay at my own homemade oven for sure.
I also measured the hot air at baking, and it whas around 350 degrees celsius, the stone elements must be mutch hotter when you measure it with a laser thermometer i think
« Last Edit: June 26, 2011, 06:01:45 AM by The Dub Oracle »


 

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