Author Topic: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.  (Read 29468 times)

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Offline dylandylan

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #160 on: May 14, 2014, 03:59:17 AM »
Wow


Offline crkoller

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #161 on: May 14, 2014, 07:58:40 AM »
Amazing. They look stunning and super consistent

Offline meatboy

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #162 on: May 14, 2014, 08:23:48 AM »
stunning! those are so awesome pies I can't find more words actually.

Offline dylandylan

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #163 on: May 14, 2014, 03:45:15 PM »
Quote from a long time ago...

During that time, I also ditched my homemade sourdough starter for an Ischia starter.  That made a big difference,  my old starter would always make a very sour and gummy dough no matter how young the leaven or little of it I use.  I guess it was too acidic (I tried many different temperatures, hydration, etc).  The Ischia starter was INCREDIBLE.  On my first go, it produced astonishing, to me, pies.  The flavor was more complex than my old starter and just had a hint of sour.  The texture was as many on the forum described about Ischia pies:  very tender melt in your mouth, very thin crispy skin, very open crumb.   The leoparding was great also.

I've just revisited this thread, great to see the progress!   I just wanted to chime in on the Ischia - I've just recently changed to Ischia after using my own homegrown starter and I'm having the same experience.  My homegrown was very sour, and now that I've seen the difference, I realise was also always tending towards gumminess.  The Ischia is really altogether better.

Now that you've been using Ischia for the best part of two years what are your thoughts about it?  I assume you're still using it?

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #164 on: May 14, 2014, 06:53:00 PM »



Thanks for the compliments, everyone!


Dylan,


The Ischia starter was great until I killed it when I went on vacation.   I am back on the homemade starter and I have debugged the problem I originally had: I was not maintaining it properly.  I feed it more frequently to maintain the milky smell.   I also use 00 flour to feed it instead of KAAF, rye and whole wheat.   Furthermore, I maintain a larger amount of starter because it seems to be more stable that way when it comes to acidity.  When I plan on baking, I feed the starter even more often.  I do not let it dome and start feeding it as soon as I see a significant amount of bubbles and volume increase.   


Soon I will be experimenting with a stiff starter ala "lievito madre" that can be seen on youtube.  I'm curious as to what difference that method will make.  I believe this is also how "crisceto" is made.   I'll post the results here.

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #165 on: May 18, 2014, 02:50:14 PM »

I just had a tremendously interesting morning.


My friend, Luca Varuni of Varuni Napoli, let me hang out in his new pizzeria a few hours before opening.   I got to see how they fire up/manage the ovens and make the dough.   He let me bring some of my own dough to cook and that experience alone was tremendous. 


Luca's passion for the craft is tremendous that his generosity for sharing information surprised me incredibly.  While I will not divulge the specific details out of respect, I can say that there are no secrets!  At one point or another we have probably made pizza the same way. Using passion and logic, it is all about what works for you.


Cooking my dough in a real Neapolitan oven (Stefano Ferrara) was beyond words.  My pizza cooked a bit different.  Neapolitan pizza just happened and I didn't have to tinker around so much like I do in my home oven.   I am not saying it is easier, I saw first how how much skill it takes to get them to work, but it is just..different. I wish I could write like Omid to bring what I felt across.   


Definitely visit Varuni Napoli when you are in Atlanta.  It is a must for hobbyists like us. 


Have a good day. 

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #166 on: May 18, 2014, 02:51:29 PM »
more with my pie baked in a Stefano Ferrara oven..
« Last Edit: May 18, 2014, 02:54:44 PM by fornographer »

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #167 on: May 18, 2014, 03:09:38 PM »
Nice post and pictures.  Great looking pie.  Did it eat better than your usual pies?

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #168 on: May 18, 2014, 03:14:27 PM »
Nice post and pictures.  Great looking pie.  Did it eat better than your usual pies?


It ate better, in that in the first attempt, the SF cooked my pie perfectly in my opinion.  The slight burn was due to me being nervous.  In my home oven, I have not been able to achieve that in a first pie.  It usually takes a great deal of balancing and sacrificial pies before I can get to the same quality. But I did learn a few lessons from Luca that I hope will work in the small oven.
« Last Edit: May 18, 2014, 04:04:14 PM by fornographer »

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #169 on: May 18, 2014, 03:15:42 PM »
Come to think of it, I think the pie cooked in the SF oven had a way thinner crispy shell than what I usually get in my small oven.   Then again, maybe it is because of how Luca showed me to form the disc. 


Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #170 on: May 18, 2014, 03:27:43 PM »
I dunno.  In imo, it has to do more with the even heat of the wfo.  It bakes all parts of the crust more uniformly,  allowing the moisture to bake off more easily.  These big well heated wfos bake and breathe better.  Home oven baked crusts always had more mositure.  The wfo bake is a drier bake.

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #171 on: May 18, 2014, 04:03:29 PM »
Yes, these real big ovens make a real difference.  I can't quite describe it.  I watched several pizzas being cooked.  While there was fire, it wasn't as aggressive as need in a small oven.  The pies that came out of these ovens, with humble looking fires, came out perfectly cooked.   The mass of the oven is cooking more of the pies than the fire compared to a small forno bravo.   The floor is also much more gentle.  The floor was just at the low 800s.   


The most curious part for me was how they used to sound of the "pala" slapping against the floor to determine whether which part is ok to cook or not.   I tried to listen to the nuance but could barely make the difference.
« Last Edit: May 18, 2014, 04:07:37 PM by fornographer »

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #172 on: May 18, 2014, 08:00:46 PM »
Chau, as far as flavor I did not detect a difference from the pie baked in the for no bravo.

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #173 on: Yesterday at 07:40:09 AM »
Hello pizza friends.  Here are a few pictures from the ongoing pizza season. Some thoughts/observations/things learned:


--Dough that has bulk fermented for a longer time seem to produce bigger blisters aka Motorino or PG.
--Pizza del Papa (butternut squash ala Keste) is delicious
--Nana's pizza (ala Varasanos) is delicious
--If a wooden proofing box is not available, a lining of baker's couche (which I use for batards, baguettes) on the bottom of a plastic dough box works WELL. Easier to pull out dough when the rows are isolated by folding the couche.
--Using the dough box modification mentioned above, I have been able to push the hydration to 72%.  My most tender and delicious pies so far.  These pies were even more tender than than the one I cooked in a SF oven a while back. 
--Short bulk ferment and very long final proof produces dough that is very easy to work with.  I have been using 1-2 hr bulk and 22 hr final proofing. 
--Stopped using a cooler altogether to control proofing temps and just use the ambient temperature of the kitchen (74-78).  I have become more comfortable using different starter and salt amounts to control the fermentation schedule. 
--I love this hobby more than ever.


« Last Edit: Yesterday at 07:41:58 AM by fornographer »

Offline vandev

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #174 on: Yesterday at 08:56:49 AM »
Bite me as well..  whow......awesome stuff...

Offline csafranek

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #175 on: Yesterday at 09:10:01 AM »
Great stuff!!!

Offline Iowamcnabb

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #176 on: Yesterday at 09:08:53 PM »
Looks great  :o

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #177 on: Yesterday at 09:15:11 PM »
I don't get the BITE ME thing? But the pizza looks great nonetheless.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline fornographer

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Re: Fornography: A Neapolitan pizza journey.
« Reply #178 on: Today at 06:15:01 AM »
I don't get the BITE ME thing? But the pizza looks great nonetheless.


OH!  That's not the "bite me" slang.  It's what I put on food pictures I upload to flickr.  I made the mistake of applying it to this batch I uploaded to pizzamaking. 





 

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