Author Topic: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!  (Read 347882 times)

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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1900 on: February 03, 2013, 04:21:43 PM »
On the menu:

Ingredients: four (type 00) of tender grain, not concentrated San Marzano tomatoes peels OGM free, fior of latte (cheese) from Agerola (Italy), sunflower oil, water of Naples, sea salt, basil, oregano, and garlic.

So no yeast ?  :P

Whoever translated struggled a little. They missed lievito natural altogether and translated pelati as "peels" not "peeled." I know I don't want my San Marzano tomato peels concentrated...
Pizza is not bread.


Offline scott123

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1901 on: February 03, 2013, 04:27:14 PM »
3000/day =  5 pies every minute for 10 hours straight with no breaks or slowdowns whatsoever. It's also 18 bags of flour/day (250g ball, 64%HR). 1,650lbs dough/day.

I'm not believing it.

Yes, I've been quoting 1,000 a day for some time.  I can't recall specifically where I read it, but I wouldn't have quoted it if it weren't from a reliable source.

Eat pray love has to have had some effect, but I'm having a really hard time seeing 3,000 pies coming out of this place in a day.

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1902 on: February 03, 2013, 04:48:15 PM »
Whoever translated struggled a little. They missed lievito natural altogether and translated pelati as "peels" not "peeled." I know I don't want my San Marzano tomato peels concentrated...

And the italian version does not list basil at all.

John

Offline kiwipete

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1903 on: February 03, 2013, 05:02:12 PM »
Yes, I've been quoting 1,000 a day for some time.  I can't recall specifically where I read it, but I wouldn't have quoted it if it weren't from a reliable source.

Eat pray love has to have had some effect, but I'm having a really hard time seeing 3,000 pies coming out of this place in a day.

If remember correctly, I think that Marco at some stage talked about them doing around 1200 per day.



Offline Pete-zza

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1904 on: February 03, 2013, 11:09:13 PM »
For Da Michele on a Saturday night service, see Reply 4 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1831.msg16213/topicseen.html#msg16213. I believe the 1200 number comes from Reply 23 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,861.msg8959/topicseen.html#msg8959.

Peter
« Last Edit: February 03, 2013, 11:12:06 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline David Deas

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1905 on: February 04, 2013, 12:11:14 AM »
3000/day =  5 pies every minute for 10 hours straight with no breaks or slowdowns whatsoever. It's also 18 bags of flour/day (250g ball, 64%HR). 1,650lbs dough/day.

I'm not believing it.

It's 500-1000 pies per day for Da Michele.  About 800 on average I believe.  

I wonder if they *could* do 3000 in a day?  They bake in less than 50 seconds a piece during peak hours so one can only imagine the capacities they're theoretically capable of.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2013, 12:15:18 AM by David Deas »

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1906 on: February 04, 2013, 12:34:00 AM »
It's 500-1000 pies per day for Da Michele.  About 800 on average I believe.  

I wonder if they *could* do 3000 in a day?  They bake in less than 50 seconds a piece during peak hours so one can only imagine the capacities they're theoretically capable of.
A multiple oven setup,sure(to be comfortable). Believe it...they understand their day to day customer count.
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Offline David Deas

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1907 on: February 04, 2013, 12:41:24 AM »
Considering that cheese is their most expensive ingredient by a large factor, I think they care a great deal. I've never met a pizza guy that wasn't acutely aware of the quantities of cheese he was using.

While we're on the topic of cheese, the water from the cheese seems pretty extreme in some of those shots.  I'm sure that there's a strong cultural preference towards wetter pies in general, but, I have a hard time picturing a Neapolitan regular reaching for one of these pies if a pizza with Craig's cheese was next to it.

I'm wondering how much of it is a cultural preference or if it's, like the variations in leoparding, another aspect of high volume pizza making- that they just can't painstakingly drain the mozz like a home baker might do.

Definitely cultural.  The soupy center is not a defect.  It should not be thought of as a defect, consequence of production limitations.  If you drain the cheese then you end up with a drier, more American pizza.  But I guess I'm one American who does not prefer American pizza.

That soup in the middle where all the flavors come together is essential, IMO.  After you finish the pizza you take the pizza bones and sop up the leftover pizza soup from your plate.  It's awesome stuff.

If you think about the simple artesian process, a wet pie is just a natural consequence.  You're suppose to lay down tomatoes you've just crushed, spread some basil you've just picked, hand tear some cheese you've just made, pinch of salt, swirl of olive oil.  Bake it in 50 seconds.  That's automatically going to give you a wet pie.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2013, 12:49:34 AM by David Deas »

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1908 on: February 04, 2013, 01:05:15 AM »
Definitely cultural.  The soupy center is not a defect.  It should not be thought of as a defect, consequence of production limitations.  If you drain the cheese then you end up with a drier, more American pizza.  But I guess I'm one American who does not prefer American pizza.

That soup in the middle where all the flavors come together is essential, IMO.  After you finish the pizza you take the pizza bones and sop up the leftover pizza soup from your plate.  It's awesome stuff.

If you think about the simple artesian process, a wet pie is just a natural consequence.  You're suppose to lay down tomatoes you've just crushed, spread some basil you've just picked, hand tear some cheese you've just made, pinch of salt, swirl of olive oil.  Bake it in 50 seconds.  That's automatically going to give you a wet pie.
This is true. But I have also had many 90-120 sec pies over there that were also great fun to eat and experience....they usually had a couple toppings choice though. Interesting how good pizza can vary there too.
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Offline Mangia Pizza

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1909 on: February 04, 2013, 09:42:51 PM »
On the menu:

Ingredients: four (type 00) of tender grain, not concentrated San Marzano tomatoes peels OGM free, fior of latte (cheese) from Agerola (Italy), sunflower oil, water of Naples, sea salt, basil, oregano, and garlic.

So no yeast ?  :P

What is the sunflower oil in the dough for?  I thought oil in the "impasto" was forbidden for pizza napoletana..... ???
Paolo


Offline kiwipete

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1910 on: February 04, 2013, 09:53:56 PM »

The sunflower oil is not in the dough, but used to finish/dress the pizza.


Offline Mangia Pizza

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1911 on: February 04, 2013, 09:58:48 PM »
The sunflower oil is not in the dough, but used to finish/dress the pizza.


According to the ingredients in post #1898, the sunflower oil is in the "impasto" which in Italian means dough mix.......

Edit..... I guess they meant on the finished pizza......
« Last Edit: February 04, 2013, 10:05:30 PM by Mangia Pizza »
Paolo

Offline dylandylan

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1912 on: February 14, 2013, 02:40:34 AM »
Well Iíve just clawed my way through this entire thread over the course of a few days.  Omid! What a journey!  I feel like Iíve read a book and a half.   I canít say Iíve read every single word, but I think Iíve learned and gained more ideas about pizza in the last few days reading this than I have in a year of making pizza.  Iím looking forward to my next bake with many new ideas to try.
 
Iíll just say thanks for initiating and sustaining such an insightful thread!
 
Lastly Iíll add that I can relate to the unfortunate trouble with Smoke Vs Neighbours.  A few weeks ago I excitedly assembled my first WFO - a stacked brick oven  (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,23141.msg235335.html#msg235335), had one successful bake by my easy standards, however when I attempted my second bake the next weekend there was a fire brigade call outÖ   the fire dept were actually fine with the oven and fire which was under control with plenty of precautions, but the smoke doesn't feel entirely welcome in the neighborhood.    Whilst Iím certain there will be ways to resolve both the smoke and community issues, I feel your pain being unable to bake in your own oven with complete freedom.  Iím sure there will be lights at the ends of these particular tunnels.

Dylan
 

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1913 on: February 16, 2013, 06:12:55 AM »
Well Iíve just clawed my way through this entire thread over the course of a few days.  Omid! What a journey!  I feel like Iíve read a book and a half.   I canít say Iíve read every single word, but I think Iíve learned and gained more ideas about pizza in the last few days reading this than I have in a year of making pizza.  Iím looking forward to my next bake with many new ideas to try.
 
Iíll just say thanks for initiating and sustaining such an insightful thread!
 
Lastly Iíll add that I can relate to the unfortunate trouble with Smoke Vs Neighbours.  A few weeks ago I excitedly assembled my first WFO - a stacked brick oven  (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,23141.msg235335.html#msg235335), had one successful bake by my easy standards, however when I attempted my second bake the next weekend there was a fire brigade call outÖ   the fire dept were actually fine with the oven and fire which was under control with plenty of precautions, but the smoke doesn't feel entirely welcome in the neighborhood.    Whilst Iím certain there will be ways to resolve both the smoke and community issues, I feel your pain being unable to bake in your own oven with complete freedom.  Iím sure there will be lights at the ends of these particular tunnels.

Dylan


Dear Dylan, you are welcome! And, I thank you for your sympathy.

Actually, I have solved the issue of smoke to an extent. Once I installed a flue pipe of larger diameter and reduced the length of the pipe from 12 feet to 6 feet, smoke stopped spewing out of the oven's mouth. Fortunately, the weather has been cold here in San Diego; hence, my neighbors have been keeping their windows closed. So, I have been operating my wood-fired oven, at least 3 times per week, under the cover of night. Moreover, during daylight, I warm up my oven with the aid of a powerful torch (the one TXCraig recommended), which is quite adequate for the purpose of baking breads without using any wood logs as fuel. I have been even baking pizzas inside the oven with the torch firing upward toward the oven dome. The torch is a great tool. (Thank you, Craig!) Have a great day, and I wish you the best in your pizza journey.

Omid
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1914 on: February 16, 2013, 07:01:18 AM »
Talking about ovens, you might be interested in the the wood-fired oven shown in the picture below. This oven is the most compact Ferrara oven I have ever seen. I believe the internal floor diameter is about 41 inches (105 centimeters). The oven is at L'Artigiano Vera Pizza, which is a Neapolitan pizza truck in Las Vegas, Nevada. For more pictures, see the Facebook page for the pizza truck:

https://www.facebook.com/LartigianoLV

My best wishes to Shon Ben-Kely, the pizzaiolo of L'Artigiano Vera Pizza. Good night!
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline meatboy

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1915 on: February 17, 2013, 02:04:46 AM »
@Omid: here is a picture of Stefano's smallest oven - the M80 (the internal diameter is 80cm).

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1916 on: February 17, 2013, 04:24:53 AM »
@Omid: here is a picture of Stefano's smallest oven - the M80 (the internal diameter is 80cm).

Dear Meatboy, I thank you for posting the picture above. This is the smallest Ferrara oven I have ever seenówith an internal floor diameter of only 80 centimeters (31.5 inches). In comparison, the Ferrara oven I work with at Bruno Pizzeria has an internal floor diameter of 130 centimeters (51 inches). If I am not mistaken, it appears to me that M80, M105, and M130 have more or less the same thickness of the base. Interesting! I wonder about the performance of the M80 or M105 in comparison to M120 or M130. Again, thank you for sharing the picture. Guten tag!

Omid
« Last Edit: February 17, 2013, 04:26:25 AM by Pizza Napoletana »
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline meatboy

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1917 on: February 17, 2013, 10:18:09 AM »
You are welcome Omid! I have just recieved the picture from Stefano's sales manager cause i'm interested in purchasing the small one ;)

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1918 on: February 17, 2013, 10:28:07 AM »
You are welcome Omid! I have just recieved the picture from Stefano's sales manager cause i'm interested in purchasing the small one ;)

Please post any info you get about this oven.  I'm sure many members will be very interested.  Thank you.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #1919 on: February 17, 2013, 12:18:29 PM »
My gut feeling is that you will regret buying an 80cm oven unless you just don't have room for anything larger. Having worked with a 120cm for a while now, I would not want an over smaller than 105cm.
Pizza is not bread.