Author Topic: price vs thickness  (Read 1164 times)

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Offline apizza

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price vs thickness
« on: June 27, 2011, 07:41:09 PM »
To those of you in the business. A new place opened and my sister gave it a try. Not too bad. The question. For a 12" pizza plain it's $8.50. OK with me. For the same, only thick it's $3 more. Since I make pizza at home I think an extra $3 is excessive for thick (about 1/2 inch). Does it really cost that much more, taking into account a profit, to make a thick? Opinions please.


Offline c0mpl3x

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Re: price vs thickness
« Reply #1 on: June 27, 2011, 10:23:59 PM »
a standard large NY style (16") pizza costs less than a buck in dough.    a fairly thick (thicker than papa johns for a reference) pizza in 16" would cost a little over a buck.
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Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: price vs thickness
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2011, 10:29:13 PM »
No it doesn't cost $3 more in ingredients but I think the cost is justified by how many more servings the thicker pizza will provide. 

This reminds me of the few restaurants that charge 50% more for a dinner if it is to be shared with another person.  The portions aren't actually much more, but they do this to discourage sharing.

 

Offline cranky

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Re: price vs thickness
« Reply #3 on: June 28, 2011, 02:25:35 PM »
Since I make pizza at home I think an extra $3 is excessive for thick (about 1/2 inch). Does it really cost that much more, taking into account a profit, to make a thick? Opinions please.

There are other costs besides flour.  Years ago hamburger joints, before McDonalds used to have thick juicy hamburgers and the thin burgers were considered less quality and cheap, which they were.   Now the chain burger places have double patties for customers who want more meat.  Why not just sell a thicker burger?  The reason is the cost accountants have figured out the energy cost to cook a patty and it saves money to cook two thin ones. 

The thicker pizza requires more dough, but also more energy to bake and oven time.  Also it takes labor and time to mix the dough. 

A batch of dough that takes the same amount of ingredients and the same time to mix will make X number of thin crust pizzas.  If they are thick crust it is X minus whatever percent that is.  So the dough prep costs are a factor.

Years ago hamburger joints, before McDonalds used to have thick juicy hamburgers and the thin burgers were considered less quality and cheap, which they were.   Now the chain burger places have double patties for customers who want more meat.  Why not just sell a thicker burger?  The reason is the cost accountants have figured out the energy cost to cook a patty and it saves money to cook two thin ones. 

A local pizza place makes both thick and thin.  The wait for the thick is noticably longer.  That means the customers are at the table longer and slowing table turnover.  Its all about money.